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onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 03:26 PM

Beginners Bike Guide
 
[COLOR=Red]Updated Apr 29, 2008[/COLOR]
Updated Items:
-New bikes and descriptions added

_______________________________________________________________
[size=5][b]Motorcycle Training and Safety[/b][/size]
_______________________________________________________________
[COLOR=Red]U[/COLOR]S[COLOR=Blue]A[/COLOR]'s Motorcycle Safety Foundation:
[url]www.msf-usa.org[/url]

[COLOR=Red]C[/COLOR]A[COLOR=Red]N[/COLOR]A[COLOR=Red]D[/COLOR]A's Gearing Up Training Program:
[url]http://www.ridertraining.org/[/url]

[URL=http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/htsaaam.htm]How To Stay Alive Aboard a Motorcycle (written by me)[/URL]

[URL=http://www.apple-insurance.com/motorcycle_safety.html]Quick Safe Riding Tips[/URL]
_______________________________________________________________
[size=5][b]Intro[/b][/size]
Well well well. You want to get a bike, do ya? I don't blame you, motorcycles are a ridiculously good time. Before you jump onto that Hayabusa for your first cruise though, it's important to know a number of things about bikes and riding in general. When I was looking for my first bike and wanted information about what models were good for beginners, what safety precautions I should take, etc etc, I found there wasn't much in the way of beginner tailored articles. So here's what I've come across in my travels. Hopefully if you're looking to buy your first bike you can get lots of good information here and can make an informed decision. Cheers!

[size=5][b]The Bikes![/b][/size]
[size=4][b]Intro and Purchasing Tips[/b][/size]

First, the basics; you’re shopping for your first ride, there’s about a million different bikes out there, and most of them people will say will kill you. So, I give you some things to consider when buying your first bike:

-[b]Weight:[/b] Heavy bikes are easy to drop, often difficult to handle, and are NOT fun to pick up if/when you drop them. They CAN provide some extra highway stability, although the aerodynamics of the bike is a bigger factor here.

-[b]Handling:[/b] Basically, the more forgiving and responsive the handling, the better. A slug of a bike will make you crash if you run a corner a bit too wide or hit the brakes too hard, while a good handling bike will give you the extra edge that may allow you to recover. A good handling bike also inspires confidence, which I suppose could also be a bad thing depending on your personality (ie. will you realize you are not Valentino Rossi after you've been riding for two months).

-[b]Upkeep:[/b] Obviously, cheaper is better here. Cheap means fuel consumption, reliability (and the associated maintenance) and cost of parts and labour. You’ll notice I don’t mention any Ducati Monsters as good beginner bikes below; that’s because they’re Italian. Lots of routine maintenance, pricey parts, and pricey dealer labour are the norm with Duc’s. Buy a nice 748 or something as a 2nd/3rd bike.

-[b]Power:[/b] This is an obvious one. You want a bike that will not loop (flip over backwards) when you screw up with the throttle, or slide out from under you coming out of a corner or something. Power delivery is usually much more important than peak power and torque figures, however. A sub 700cc twin is great for beginners, as it’ll provide smooth, linear power delivery (more traction with the power on…Google "Big Bang engines", used in MotoGP bikes). Most of the bikes I recommend have such an engine.

-[b]Resale:[/b] You will eventually want to sell your first bike. Because of this, and the fact that you will likely cause at least a bit of damage to the bike during the learning process, I fully recommend a safe, serviceable, but older and used bike as your first. The devaluation of a few scratches won’t hurt NEARLY as bad on an already scratched ’95 EX500 as it would with an ’08 fresh from the dealership.

Also, a general note on [b]insurance costs[/b]: Anything classified as a "sport bike" will be obscenely expensive to insure. Usually anything over 750cc will be obscenely expensive to insure. Bikes under 500cc are pretty cheap to insure, and under 250cc are VERY inexpensive. But if you're 19 and want a 1000cc sportbike, I hope you're independently wealthy. Oh and you'll probably die before you make your first insurance payment anyways.


[size=4][b]Voila, Beginner Bikes[/b][/size]

Okay, now what I want to do is list specific models that are suitable for beginners along with pros and cons for each model. I also recognize that some people will refuse to start on anything but a 600cc or bigger supersport, so I've included a "Not Recommended But Okay For Beginners" sports bike section near the end of the guide. Read on!

First up, the [b]Honda Rebel 250[/b]. It’s small, light, cheap, reliable, excellent on gas, low to the ground semi-decent handling, and the list goes on. It is probably *the* bike for your first 15 hours of riding. The problem is that if you weigh more than 140lbs you will probably get very bored very quickly with it’s motor. Additionally, because of it’s small size, it can be a bit of a chore on the highway. It is, however, unquestionably the cheapest bike here to buy, maintain, and insure.

[IMG]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/rebel%20250.gif[/IMG]

Weight: A few pounds heavier than your Huffy.
Handling: Light, good for a cruiser. Cheap suspension, obviously.
Upkeep: About the same as your Honda lawnmower. You changed the oil on that maybe 5 years ago right? Yeah….
Power: Just right for an absolute beginner, but a bit pedestrian for full size adults after logging a few thousand miles.
Resale: They’re cheap to buy and cheap to sell. Minimal/no body work means dropping it won’t destroy resale like dropping a sport bike would.
Overall: If you’re smaller build, it would be a fantastic first bike. If you’re edging up to 180lbs or more, you’ll probably want to pass on this bike (LOL CUZ U WON’T BE DOING THAT ON THE HIGHWAY LOLOL)




Next, the [b]Yamaha Virago 250[/b]. This little bike is quite similar to Honda's Rebel, but is a little more upscale. It rides a little nicer and is of slightly higher quality.

[img]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/virago%20250.jpg[/img]

Weight: Same as the Rebel
Handling: Same as the Rebel, but with slightly uprated suspension and brakes.
Upkeep: Same as the Rebel.
Power: More than the Rebel. About 7-8hp more, in fact. This sounds like nothing, but when you're moving from 15hp to 22hp, it's significant.
Resale: Same as the Rebel
Overall:Same as the Rebel




I'm not sure if this is available in the US, but in Canada and elsewhere the [b]CBR125R[/b] is a fantastic bike to look towards as a starter. Even smaller, lighter, and easier to handle than the Ninja 250 listed below, this little four stroke, single cylinder bike will be sure to put a smile on your face. Last year Honda had a deal with the bike and all the required gear for about $4000 CAN...pretty impressive. The 2008 looks even better with an underseat exhaust. It even has fuel injection, a luxury that should not be overlooked in this price category.

[urlttp://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/CBR125.jpg[/url]


Weight: 280 lbs....WITH ALL FLUIDS AND A FULL GAS TANK. That is ridiculous. Messed up a parking job? Just lift up the rear end and move it.
Handling: Perfect for an urban setting, it's small, quick, and stable. Brakes and suspension are more than enough for any beginner. The definition of a light, flickable bike.
Upkeep: As with the Rebel, it's a simple, reliable Honda engine that will last longer than you. It gets an almost unbelievable [b]94 mpg[/b]. Take that OPEC!
Power: Well...honestly not much at all. It will get you up to highway speed, and you'll have fun rowing the gears, but don't be expecting to get going much faster than 130 km/h downhill with a tailwind. More than enough for around town, however.
Resale: Hard to say...the bike is pretty new still. It's very cheap to start with and a good looker, so it would be tough to lose a lot of money by selling one after a year or so.
Overall: A great option for someone who is pinching pennies, does a lot of urban riding/commuting, or is of small/light body type. It looks great, can dash through a 30" hole in traffic, and gives a big hug to mother nature and your wallet while simultaneously telling OPEC where to go and how to get there.




Now here's a beauty...the new [b]Ninja 250[/b]. It's an updated version of the venerable 250R that survived for about 7 eons relatively unchanged. Now it's got great looks and a bit more performance than the old one, and just about anyone could feel cool riding it. So you can buy the new one if you need great looks for your first bike, or you can save about $1500 and get an older one in decent shape.

[IMG]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/250R.jpg[/IMG]

Weight: Picture a butterfly dancing on the breeze
Handling: Good brakes, lots of lean angle, light steering, forgiving. Excellent for the beginner.
Upkeep: The engine is a carbureted parallel twin of 80’s design, and it’s bulletproof and cheap to maintain.
Power: It’ll do zero to 60 in about 5 seconds and can even wheelie if you REALLY work it, but it won’t spit you on your ass if you get a bit hamfisted. Power is pretty peaky, though. You’ll have to rev the heck out of it to get it really moving.
Resale: Buy one of these from the early nineties and you’ll almost get your entire investment back when you upgrade. A new one is only $3500 MSRP though, so how much can that really depreciate?
Overall: The definitive small-person sports bike and the baseline for which all other beginner bikes are judged. And rightly so: it handles well, has enough power to be entertaining, gets great mileage (about 80 mpg), is cheap, and looks a proper sport bike.




Some people simply must buy American, and for these people there is the [b]Buell Blast[/b]. Overall, the Blast IS a good bike for beginners, but there are myriad quality and maintenance issues that must be recognized and dealt with.

[url]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/blast.jpg[/url]

Weight: Light as a feather dancing on the breeze.
Handling: It's light and maneuverable, BUT the suspension is noticeably cheap, and it won't impress or instill a ton of confidence in corners as a result. Keep speeds reasonable (which you should be doing anyways) and it handles better than a beginner needs. It's also got a very low seat height, which is perfect for small-of-stature folk.
Upkeep: Yikes. Earlier generations were so unreliable that Buell's parent company Harley Davidson actually faced lawsuits. Apparantly there was a problem with oil leaks springing and spraying oil on the tires, resulting in a crash. Newer models (2002+) should be fine, but the Blast still won't be as reliable as it's Japanese counterparts. Expect to pay for regular maintenance. Also, there are many reports on the net from people who have had problems with Buell/Harley dealerships. Problems range from jerkoff customer service people ("buy a REAL bike kid", while nodding at the Harleys in the corner) to incompetent mechanics. There are also reports of frames cracking and random manufacturing/quality control issues. So basically your shiny new Blast might break down right outside the dealership and their tech guy won't be able/willing to help you. You've been warned!
Power: Not bad, it puts out just under 35hp in a very mild manner. Just about perfect for lighter riders or for your first thousand miles on a bike.
Resale: Really, really not very good. They ARE cheap to begin with, so you won't lose a whole bunch of money, but in terms of percentages you won't do very well.
Overall: A light, low, nimble little bike that is perfect for new riders (especially lighter ones/ladies) and is made in the US of A. Just beware maintenance, and stay far away from older models.




Next up is the [b]Suzuki GS500[/b]. It was originally made as a naked bike, which was discontinued. I recommend the naked/old/used variant because of the upright riding position and the lack of expensive fairing. If you absolutely MUST have a new sport bike, however, the faired version is a great way to go. The bike is powered by an old, air cooled Suzuki twin that is low tech (cheap to maintain) and sufficiently powerful.

[url]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/gs500.jpg[/url]

[URL=http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/gs500f.jpg]Faired Version[/URL]

Weight: Pretty light. Slightly heavier than modern supersports.
Handling: Cheap suspension, but it turns, brakes, and accelerates as well as a beginner will ever need.
Upkeep: Minimal. It’s made of a bunch of old Suzuki parts that you could probably find at a bike wrecker for the approximate cost of DIRT, if need be.
Power: Somewhat spirited. Enough that it can be wheelied if you thrash it hard enough, and you’ll have passing power on the highway. It has a very linear (easy to control) power delivery.
Resale: Buy a used one and your resale will leave you happy. Buy a new one….probably not so much, but you’d get a pretty fairing.
Overall: Very good bike for a beginner. The suspension is it’s biggest limiting factor, but unless you’re doing track days regularly in your first year of riding you won’t care. It’s cheap, decently quick, and forgiving.




Now I bring you my first bike, the [b]Kawasaki Ninja EX500[/b] (500r in Canuckistan). This is where things start to get a little sporty: you can in fact get into trouble in a hurry on this bike of ~50hp. It gets upwards of 45mpg, handles reasonably well, and is easy to maintain. This is usually what is recommended for riders who feel they are too big to start out on the 250 Ninja. It’s powered by a liquid cooled parallel twin that is basically an old ZX-9 engine chopped in half.

[IMG]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/k_ninja500r.jpg[/IMG]

Weight: It’s no Harley, but is actually heavier than the supersports of today.
Handling: Budget suspension, but better than the GS500. Good brakes, good tractable motor, good highway manners.
Upkeep: Minimal, and parts are plentiful at any wrecker’s.
Power: Spirited; its undeniably faster than the vast majority of the cars on the road, but it isn’t peaky like 4 a cylinder motor.
Resale: Pretty good. You’ll lose some for scratches on the body work, but you were smart enough to buy used anyways right? RIGHT?
Overall: Great bike to get if you don’t plan on upgrading within a year. It’s a good compromise of power, gas mileage, handling, and cost. Naturally I’m biased because I :heart:ed my bike, but in my mind this could be the bike that keeps the most beginners both entertained and alive.




A not-so-subtle competitor for Suzuki's very successful SV650, the [b]Kawasaki Ninja 650r[/b] is very similar in all respects. It has a more upright seating position, lower seat, slightly less peak power, and more compliant suspension, making it a better choice for the commuter. It's attributes are so comparable with the SV650, however, that I won't go into more detail; for all intents and purposes, beginners will have the same degree of success on both bikes.

[IMG]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/650r.jpg[/IMG]

Weight: See SV650
Handling: See SV650
Upkeep:See SV650
Power: See SV650
Resale: See SV650
Overall: See SV650


The [b]Suzuki GSX 650F[/b] is basically a Bandit with a revvier engine and sporty bodywork. It has fuel injection, slightly fancier body work, better suspension, a more advanced instrument cluster, and a price that's $2500 higher than the GS500F. This is Suzuki's attempt to catch some of the SV650's glory. As it is based off of the Bandit (which was NOT a sport bike), the GSX650F will have softer suspension and less sporting pretensions than the SV650 and the Ninja 650r. Otherwise, it is very similar.

[IMG]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/GSX650F_EGR_R.1.jpg[/IMG]




Last of the "recommended" sporty bikes is the bouncy and playful [b]Suzuki SV650[/b]. It comes in both faired and unfaired versions. The faired version may be more expensive to insure due to it being classified as a sport bike. Both have plenty of get-up-and-go, look great, and handle superbly. This bike is so popular, in fact, that it has it’s own racing series. The newest generation has angular styling and fuel injection. I recommend the older ones, as they’re cheaper, look better (imho) and handle the same.

[IMG]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/SV650%20faired.jpg[/IMG]

[URL=http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/SV650%2DRed.jpg]Unfaired Version[/URL]

Weight: Competitive with modern supersports. It’s light.
Handling: The best in this bunch by a good margin. It has a very stiff chassis, solid suspension components, good brakes and a smooth, tractable engine.
Upkeep: Because it’s the only bike here that essentially wasn’t designed in the 80’s, parts can be a bit more, but still reasonable. It’s very reliable, however, and easy to work on.
Power: Verging on too much for a beginner. It’s torquey, so a quick twist of the throttle can and will lift the front wheel. It has a smooth, linear power delivery but there is enough there to get you into trouble in a big hurry if you aren’t paying attention.
Resale: Decent, but worst of the bunch. You will lose some money when you resell, unless you buy a crashed one and have a dealership hookup to get it fixed on the cheap or something. However, this is a bike you could keep for years, so maybe it’s not as big a deal.
Overall: It’s an amazing bike, really; the issue is whether or not a beginner should have it. *cue video of jackass plowing into a tree from a standstill on an SV*. If you’re mature, wouldn’t call yourself a ‘speed demon’, and you have some extra cash to burn, this could be the one for you.




Sport bike not your speed? Don't want a piddly little "toy cruiser"? How about the [b]Yamaha V-Star 650[/b]. It comes in Classic or Custom styling and is a nice blend of quality components, light weight, and good style. It looks a lot bigger than it really is (in fact, it has a very low seat height).

[img]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/vstar%20650%20custom.jpg[/img]

Weight: Pretty chunky in comparison to the other bikes here, but light and manageable for a cruiser. If you're planning on ending up with a 1600cc power cruiser sometime down the road, this might be a good entry point for you.
Handling: Very good, for a cruiser. It basically hasn't changed in design since it's inception in 98, but it was effective then and it still is. Don't expect to be taking on sport bikes in the corners (if you were expecting that, you're looking at the wrong bike anyways).
Upkeep: Almost nil. It's bulletproof, and a proven design. You really can't go wrong. It's also good on gas because it's not a high revving race engine.
Power: Tame and controllable, but plenty for highway cruising. Sufficient on the highway, more than sufficient in the city.
Resale: If you buy used, you won't do too badly. As always, buy new, you'll lose quite a bit.
Overall: A great entry point for heavyweight cruiser afficiendos. It's lighter and easier to handle than a big cruiser, but it looks like a big cruiser. This is pretty much the bike that started the small-bike-with-a-big-bike-look that has become so popular.




Now, something a little different: the [b]Triumph Bonneville[/b]. It's got the "classic" look, with fairly modern suspension and brakes. It's powered by a 750cc twin, which is comparable in performance to the SV650, but is has tamer power delivery (ie. it's not high strung like a sport bike). It's one of the more expensive bikes to purchase here if you're anywhere but the UK, but is overall a pretty good bike for beginners.

[IMG]http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/Bonneville_6_main.jpg[/IMG]

Weight: About 450lbs dry, so it's not exactly a lightweight. Still, light and low enough to the ground to be quite manageable
Handling: Decent brakes, decent suspension. It IS a classic-style bike, so it's no road burner, but it handles just fine. A good city bike.
Upkeep: Reasonable. Labour at a Triumph dealer isn't the cheapest, but this isn't the cheapest bike you could buy either (quite the opposite, actually, if you're in North America). The twin design is simple and reliable. Overall, not much to worry about.
Power: Substantial power for a beginner, but relatively easy to manage. Pretty comparable to the SV650, really.
Resale: There isn't a huge demand for bikes like these, so there aren't too many around second hand. Expect resale to be a bit of a pain, and not particularly profitable.
Overall: If the Bonnie's style is your style, you're probably mature and level headed enough to handle it's power. If you're not into "those racing bikes", and don't want the heft and sluggish handling of a cruiser, this could be a great bike for you.




Lastly, for those that absolutely will NOT do without a supersport bike, there is an option for you: buy an older model. The 600cc supersports from the early 90's (generally 89-93) are less powerful and less "track ready" than current supersports. They are still very fast, with most having about 90hp, but they are also nimble and handle well. Resale on these is really good, because they've already lost most of the value that they will ever lose. I've grouped together the Yamaha FZR 600, the Kawasaki ZX6-D, and the Honda CBR 600 F2 together in this group. Suzuki's entry at the time was considered to be the raciest, and it was hard and unforgiving by comparison, so I won't recommend that one.

[b]Let me be very clear on this: I do NOT recommend these bikes for absolute beginners. They are fast, they are furious, and they will get inexperienced and uncautious riders killed. I am merely suggesting them as an option for those who refuse to ride anything but a "real" sport bike as their first bike[/b]

[URL=http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/FZR%20right%20side.jpg]Yamaha FZR 600[/URL]
[URL=http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/zx6d.JPG]Kawasaki ZX6-D[/URL]
[URL=http://homepage.usask.ca/~msd039/Genmay/Beginner%20Bike%20Guide/Images/cbr%20f2.jpg]Honda CBR 600 F2[/URL]

Weight: Heavier than modern supersports, but pretty damn light in this crowd.
Handling: These were the best bikes of the time, so the suspension is as good as it got...at the time. Premium suspension with dated technology means that overall these are pretty solid handling bikes. Brakes are strong.
Upkeep: They're all carbureted and simple by today's standards in terms of technology. They're also high strung racing machines, however, and have probably been ridden as such by their previous owners. Expect to have to start replacing things that you would normally replace at high mileage, and some examples might even need an engine rebuild.
Power: All of these bikes put out more than 85hp. They are rev-happy, peaky race engines. They can and will be a handful for the beginner, and they will be dangerous for the beginner lacking caution and restraint.
Resale: They've already done most of their devaluing. You'll probably lose relatively little money reselling them.
Overall: I don't recommend these bikes as a first. They are very fast, with peaky power delivery and rather stretched out ergonomics (read: racing position). They have high seats. They get the worst mileage of the bunch. They will burn through tires faster. They were probably used and abused by previous owners. They are almost bulletproof, very good handlers, and fulfill the racebike feel that so many people want, though.

Kidane 04-10-2005 03:54 PM

Awesome, thanks for this. :cool:

princess0fdiabl0 04-10-2005 04:01 PM

nice, old information for someone whos researched but maybe we can get it stickied for new folk

onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 04:03 PM

[QUOTE=princess0fdiabl0]nice, old information for someone whos researched but maybe we can get it stickied for new folk[/QUOTE]

Yeah, the thing is most people don't research. They come to automay and say "omg i'm gettina b iek what shud I get?"

SebTheDJ 04-10-2005 04:20 PM

Sweet mother of god.

Good Job mofo.

OneWhoKnows 04-10-2005 04:52 PM

Stickied and kept open so people can show us bikes they're looking at and ask other questions.

I also edited in the MSF link to your first power onewheel :heart:

onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 04:56 PM

:heart:

SliP 04-10-2005 05:21 PM

more love man, i should write a supra buyers guide :P

onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 06:39 PM

[QUOTE=SliP]more love man, i should write a supra buyers guide :P[/QUOTE]

lol "How You Too Can Run Your Own Suprahh Brothel"
:D :heart:

karax 04-10-2005 07:39 PM

I'm all signed up for the MSF course, I'm so excited for this summer :D

But you listed the bikes I'm looking at save one: the yamaha Seca II. Do you happen to think that this would be a good beginner bike? Because I kinda really like them. I know they are an i4, but I've heard they can be a good beginner bike.

Rancidpunk666 04-10-2005 07:43 PM

dont forget to add the honda 599.. :)

Applejuice 04-10-2005 09:40 PM

I will add that if you are going to get a 600cc sportbike for your first bike (which thousands of people do every year reguardless of what you tell them), get a CBR. They are by far the easier sportbike to handle.

onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 09:44 PM

[QUOTE=karax]I'm all signed up for the MSF course, I'm so excited for this summer :D

But you listed the bikes I'm looking at save one: the yamaha Seca II. Do you happen to think that this would be a good beginner bike? Because I kinda really like them. I know they are an i4, but I've heard they can be a good beginner bike.[/QUOTE]

Congrats. Always great to see new people joining the fold :D

Yeah the Seca II is a nice little bike. It's much more rare than the ones listed above, but it looks good and goes well. It's actually pretty comparable to the EX500 except the riding position is more upright and it gets slightly better gas mileage. I think it makes like 5hp less than the EX.

If you can find a good price for one it would be a great beginner bike :) One thing, however, is used parts might be rather scarce. There's a crapload of EX500s and 250s at any wreckers, but usually very few Seca's.

[QUOTE=Kase's Underage Boyfri]dont forget to add the honda 599.. :)[/QUOTE]

See....I considered it, but it's got almost 30hp more than the SV650, which I already consider to be a lot of bike for a beginner. It's my strong personal belief that any bike based off of a 600 supersport is a bit much for someone who's never ridden before. The 599 would make an awesome bike, but I like to err on the side of caution and with that in mind I'd recommmend staying away from it for a first ride. :)

onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 09:45 PM

[QUOTE=Applejuice]I will add that if you are going to get a 600cc sportbike for your first bike (which thousands of people do every year reguardless of what you tell them), get a CBR. They are by far the easier sportbike to handle.[/QUOTE]

Truth.

Perhaps I should make a section in the first post entitled "If You're Going to Ignore Me and Get a SuperSport Anyways, Read This!" :o

electric!sheep 04-10-2005 09:51 PM

I got a Kawasaki KLR650 as my first bike, and the amount of power is just right. It has also forgiven a few low-speed falls on the dirt.

onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 09:53 PM

[QUOTE=electric!sheep]I got a Kawasaki KLR650 as my first bike, and the amount of power is just right. It has also forgiven a few low-speed falls on the dirt.[/QUOTE]

Those bikes are :cool:

They have a really high seat though do they not?

Applejuice 04-10-2005 10:22 PM

[QUOTE]One final rule: whenever passing another motorcyclist, a polite wave is required. Itís somewhat of an unwritten law, and almost like a secret handshake. Those silly fools in the cars donít know what theyíre missing. [/QUOTE]

I HATE HATE HATE when people don't wave back! (Usually R6/Gixxer squids)

onewheeldoin200 04-10-2005 10:58 PM

[QUOTE=Applejuice]I HATE HATE HATE when people don't wave back! (Usually R6/Gixxer squids)[/QUOTE]

QFMFT!!!

I always find that when I'm on my dad's Suzuki cruiser, the Harley guys don't wave either because I'm obviously not a "real" rider :tard: :rolleyes:

Rancidpunk666 04-11-2005 07:31 AM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]QFMFT!!!

I always find that when I'm on my dad's Suzuki cruiser, the Harley guys don't wave either because I'm obviously not a "real" rider :tard: :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]
harley people really piss me off...............

they think they are better, when in reality their mullet pushrod motors are out dated and underpowerd and make the most hideous noise ever.....

they are just jealous :o

VanFanel 04-11-2005 12:58 PM

Very awesome thread. I am looking for a beginner bike myself, and this is a very good read for me!

SamuraiJack 04-11-2005 02:22 PM

thx for the help

im gona get myself a bike this summer :D hopefuly, think i will go for an aprillia rs 125 or an nsr 125

SVTGMoney 04-11-2005 04:27 PM

I'll more than likely be getting a bike this summer, but after researching for something like 2 years, i still cant decide what to start with. After taking the safety course, do you think it would be a better idea to start with an EX500 and worry about all the hastle of selling it a year later to get a CBR600 or just really taking it easy and starting with a CBR600? I've asking tons of people and it's split right down the middle, one half saying "get an EX500, you'd kill yourself on a CBR" and the other half saying "if you can respect the power your bike has, you'd be fine starting on a CBR600" What do you guys think?

BTW, awesome thread! A+ Content

Aesculapius 04-11-2005 05:43 PM

Holy shit, this is a great thread. I might be getting a bike this summer, so I thank you bunches for this.

Where do i go shopping for a used bike? is there any good sites online like autotrader? How would I go about finding dealerships?

And how much should I expect to spend on a beginner bike? would $1200 be enough to get a decent one?

OneWhoKnows 04-11-2005 06:10 PM

[QUOTE=SVTGMoney]I'll more than likely be getting a bike this summer, but after researching for something like 2 years, i still cant decide what to start with. After taking the safety course, do you think it would be a better idea to start with an EX500 and worry about all the hastle of selling it a year later to get a CBR600 or just really taking it easy and starting with a CBR600? I've asking tons of people and it's split right down the middle, one half saying "get an EX500, you'd kill yourself on a CBR" and the other half saying "if you can respect the power your bike has, you'd be fine starting on a CBR600" What do you guys think?

BTW, awesome thread! A+ Content[/QUOTE]
If you know someone who owns a CBR600 or similar sportbike, ask them if you can ride it ( :lol: who in their right mind would say yes? - no offense).

Everyone is different. You get guys who start off on a real beginners bike and just bone out on it for a year or so and get to the point where they can power out of turns and lean past the bike's capabilities... then they upgrade to a 600 and they do pretty well on it.

You get other guys who start off on 600s and do just as well as you can expect, starting off slow and learning the capabilities and limits of the bike slowly yet surely.

Then again, you get guys who get 600s and are just plain scared of what it can do - the throttle and edges of the tire never see the use it was intended to and as a result, the rider learns horrible riding manners.

onewheeldoin200 04-11-2005 06:43 PM

[QUOTE=SVTGMoney]I'll more than likely be getting a bike this summer, but after researching for something like 2 years, i still cant decide what to start with. After taking the safety course, do you think it would be a better idea to start with an EX500 and worry about all the hastle of selling it a year later to get a CBR600 or just really taking it easy and starting with a CBR600? I've asking tons of people and it's split right down the middle, one half saying "get an EX500, you'd kill yourself on a CBR" and the other half saying "if you can respect the power your bike has, you'd be fine starting on a CBR600" What do you guys think?

BTW, awesome thread! A+ Content[/QUOTE]
My gut feeling is that the EX500 is the way to go. I had mine for a year and durinig that year I didn't outgrow it. The only reason I sold it was to pay for school, and I ended up regretting the decision and buying a shit-beat ZX6 the next summer...poor decision making. I wish I'd kept the EX500.

The fact is, you will be a better rider if you start off on the 500. You won't be scared shitless of the bike's power (which you should be of that CBR) and you'll be able to focus on shifting, braking, lean angles, throttle delivery etc etc MUCH better than if you are always forced to think about whether the bike will jump out from under you. That EX500 does 0-60 in 4.5 seconds....pretty fucking quick, and it'll hit 220km/h. I think it's plenty of bike. Plus, it doesn't have full fairings, so if you drop it the damage won't be as bad (I slid mine for 15 feet along a road on it's side, after which it flipped and bashed the other side. Total damage: about $200. That would be more like $1500 on a CBR. Yes I was being a fucking idiot).

[QUOTE=Aesculapius]Holy shit, this is a great thread. I might be getting a bike this summer, so I thank you bunches for this.

Where do i go shopping for a used bike? is there any good sites online like autotrader? How would I go about finding dealerships?

And how much should I expect to spend on a beginner bike? would $1200 be enough to get a decent one?[/QUOTE]

CommiePunk? :D edit: I'm a dumbass, I read that "thank you bunchies". Genmay is getting to me :o

I prefer buying used bikes privately, usually through classifieds. Cycletrader.com is a good one. If you're in Canada then buysell.com is by far the best, but check local papers too. You'll get a better deal, but I HIGHLY recommend bringing someone knowledgeable about bikes with you. They'll be able to take it for a ride and verify that it's in the condition the seller says it is. I had a rider with ~6 years experience come with me to check out my first bike and ride it home for me. :lol: then my first time on it I tried to make a 90 degree turn out of my driveway and went straight across the street in front of a van to the sidewalk on the other side :lol:

Dealerships - check out your yellowpages under 'motorcycles'. If you can, talk with some local riders: they'll know what delearships to avoid, and trust me, some of them are TERRIBLE.

$1200 could be enough for a beginner bike. It really depends. My friend bought an 84 Suzuki Tempter 650 for $900 (Canadian), beat the crap out of it for a year and then upgraded to a CBR F4i the following year; it worked out great for him. On the other hand, it might be hard to find a serviceable 92 EX500 (or even the 250) for that price. If that is your budget, stick with the older "standard" bikes like that Tempter or an old Yamaha or something.

edit: Don't forget to budget for safety gear. At a bare minimum you're probabbly looking at around $500. Motorcycle-specific clothing is essential, too, because regular low cut boots, standard leather gloves and jackets will fold, move around on your body, or fly right off in a crash. Plus they are almost always thinner leather that wouldn't protect you in a crash anyways.

princess0fdiabl0 04-11-2005 06:48 PM

craigslist.org is also a decent place to go for used cycles. I wouldnt only check there but its a nice addition to cycletrader + newspaper classifieds etc.

onewheeldoin200 04-11-2005 06:54 PM

[QUOTE=SamuraiJack]thx for the help

im gona get myself a bike this summer :D hopefuly, think i will go for an aprillia rs 125 or an nsr 125[/QUOTE]

Those are awesome beginner bikes :D. Do you live in the UK by any chance? Their licensing system is so vastly superior to anything in North America it's embarassing.

I also wish North America didn't have such a hardon for "bigger is better"...I'd love to get me a real modern 400-500cc supersport :drool:

ReTECH 04-11-2005 08:00 PM

haha, Harleys are just a different breed, man. I get a mix of cool & asshole out of Harley people, sportbike poeple, tourers, everyone. Same as any group; bikers are made up of individuals, & I try to let people tie their own noose. :)


1O@200 : Do you have this fine piece published or hosted somewhere? I'd like to refer folks to it, who might not be suited to genmay.

onewheeldoin200 04-11-2005 08:22 PM

[QUOTE=ReTECH]haha, Harleys are just a different breed, man. I get a mix of cool & asshole out of Harley people, sportbike poeple, tourers, everyone. Same as any group; bikers are made up of individuals, & I try to let people tie their own noose. :)


1O@200 : Do you have this fine piece published or hosted somewhere? I'd like to refer folks to it, who might not be suited to genmay.[/QUOTE]

The whole thing or just the paper? I could convert the bike reviews thing to a word document, and I have that paper in word format already. I also have another one called "Motorcycle Safety in Canada" that I wrote last year. More in depth on safety than the one above. If it would help you I could zip them all up and post a link here.

And thanks to everyone for the kind comments....I feel all warm and fuzzy inside now :heart:

edit: it's up there now. Hope that helps :)

CanuckDave 04-11-2005 08:47 PM

wow, thats an incredibly good write up, thanks man.

TheFleshRocket 04-11-2005 09:58 PM

A couple of other good potential "first" bikes:

Yamaha FZR600 (circa 1989 to current, I believe)
~70ish rwhp, which is right in the hunt with the SV650. Power delivery will actually be more user-friendly than the SV, because the Fizzer makes less torque down low. Keep the revs down and the bike is more tolerant of ham-fisted riding. Wheels and tires aren't exactly conducive to finding the newest, stickiest rubber, but there are still some sticky tires out there if you look. The bike has been around since the late '80s with minimal changes, so you can probably find an early/mid '90s version reasonably cheaply.

Suzuki Bandit 600 (early/mid-90s to current)
~70ish rwhp, air/oil cooled engine based off of the early GSX-R600 but tuned for more torque. Not a beast of speed by any means. Only upper-faired, so there's less plastic to mar. The riding position is more comfortable than the Fizzer, because the Bandito is more of a sport-standard than a sportbike. The suspension is also plusher, so it doesn't handle quite as well, but the wheels are standard 17 inchers front and rear, so good tires should be easy to find.

Yamaha SECA II (early '90s)
600cc air cooled motor, producing something around 65rwhp IIRC. It's pretty comparable to the Bandit aside from making a few less horsepower. It's rarer than the Bandit, but good ones seem to be pretty common on Ebay, going for $2000-$2500 in very nice shape.

Honda CBR 600F2/F3 ('91 - '98)
600cc ~85-95rwhp, around 455 lbs wet, reasonably modern tires, brakes, and suspension. A surprisingly competent bike, and Honda won quite a few sportbike roundups with these models as they perform very well but are also good all-arounders. Possibly a bit too much horsepower for n00b riders, but if you have self-control and keep the revs down, they are very manageable and user friendly. Since they're so common, reasonably nice ones should be available in the $2500-$3500 range. Good resale value as long as you don't add too many scratches to it.

There are others that fit the bill too, but they are rarer and therefore less-likely candidates. They include the mid-'80s Honda VF500F (four-cylinder V-four, upper 50s rwhp, weighs about as much as a modern 600 but with inferior brakes, tires and suspension but zippy and surprisingly fun), Honda CB1 (early '90s naked bike, 400cc 4-banger, surprisingly adept suspention, tires and brakes, but very rare and not especially quick), Suzuki Bandit 400 (another light-weight naked bike, very similar in character and performance to the CB1).

All of this information is off the top of my head so my numbers might not be entirely accurate, but I have actually logged seat time in most of these bikes so I stick by my impressions.

SamuraiJack 04-11-2005 11:16 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]Those are awesome beginner bikes :D. Do you live in the UK by any chance? Their licensing system is so vastly superior to anything in North America it's embarassing.

I also wish North America didn't have such a hardon for "bigger is better"...I'd love to get me a real modern 400-500cc supersport :drool:[/QUOTE]


yes i do and i cant get anything bigger than 125 for my first bike till i pass my test and then i could get any bike but restricted to 33 bhp for 2 years i think...im not totally sure though. ive been looking at bikes for a while now and cant wait to get 1 :D

ph00ny 04-12-2005 07:10 AM

what about people that are way too tall/big to be riding in small bikes?

onewheeldoin200 04-12-2005 10:56 AM

[QUOTE=ph00ny]what about people that are way too tall/big to be riding in small bikes?[/QUOTE]

If size is an issue you'll probably need a sub-1000cc cruiser of some sort. My dad has a Suzuki Volusia 800, for instance, and it's very friendly and manageable. It might be a little heavy, but if you're too big for the bikes above then a little weight shouldn't be an issue. The advantage of cruisers is the HUGE array of accessories for them; you can stretch out with highway bars, add floorboards etc etc.

Other good options in this category are older Yamaha Virago's and Honda Magna's.

putty_thing 04-12-2005 11:46 AM

Good post, I'm in the UK and looking at getting a bike soonish (hopefully I'll be riding before summer).

The list posted was interesting, but the general feeling from people here I've had on suitable beginner bikes were the Suzuki Bandit 600/650, Honda Hornet (CB600F, 599 over there), and Yamaha FZ6 (which I'm looking closest at) - all 'mid-weight' bikes, making more like 80whp.

I was planning on picking up an 03/04 for around £2-4000 - any thoughts?

Also, whats so good about our bike licencing over here?

OneWhoKnows 04-12-2005 12:59 PM

[QUOTE=putty_thing]Good post, I'm in the UK and looking at getting a bike soonish (hopefully I'll be riding before summer).

The list posted was interesting, but the general feeling from people here I've had on suitable beginner bikes were the Suzuki Bandit 600/650, Honda Hornet (CB600F, 599 over there), and Yamaha FZ6 (which I'm looking closest at) - all 'mid-weight' bikes, making more like 80whp.

I was planning on picking up an 03/04 for around £2-4000 - any thoughts?

Also, whats so good about our bike licencing over here?[/QUOTE]
More restrictions = less newbies on big bikes = less deaths.

onewheeldoin200 04-12-2005 01:24 PM

[QUOTE=putty_thing]Good post, I'm in the UK and looking at getting a bike soonish (hopefully I'll be riding before summer).

The list posted was interesting, but the general feeling from people here I've had on suitable beginner bikes were the Suzuki Bandit 600/650, Honda Hornet (CB600F, 599 over there), and Yamaha FZ6 (which I'm looking closest at) - all 'mid-weight' bikes, making more like 80whp.

I was planning on picking up an 03/04 for around £2-4000 - any thoughts?

Also, whats so good about our bike licencing over here?[/QUOTE]
The Bandit's a great choice, but I personally wouldn't recommend the Hornet or FZ6 for someone who's never been on a bike before. Just a little too much oomph for me think that they would help the beginner up that initially very steep learning curve.

And as for licensing, OWK's pretty much got it in a nutshell :p

[QUOTE=OneWhoKnows]More restrictions = less newbies on big bikes = less deaths.[/QUOTE]

To compare some death rate statistics (in deaths per 100 million vehicle miles travelled), the US is sitting at around 33, Canada is about 22, and the UK.....? 8. So basically a motorcyclist in the states is around 4 times as likely to die on a bike than a motorcyclist in the UK.

Triden 04-12-2005 01:32 PM

Excellent faq! :)

Too bad it doesnt apply to my dirtbike :p

How bad is incurance compared to a car? Approximate percentages maybe..

TheFleshRocket 04-12-2005 02:55 PM

[QUOTE=OneWhoKnows]More restrictions = less newbies on big bikes = less deaths.[/QUOTE]

The only difference between a squid on a 600 and a squid on a 1000 is that the squid on the 1000 is just going to be going a bit faster when he wrecks. While it might be a bit easier to reach excessive speeds on a 10-second bike, it's not that much harder to do so on an 11-second bike. And actually most 600s are dipping into the high 10s now, anyway.

TheFleshRocket 04-12-2005 03:05 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]To compare some death rate statistics (in deaths per 100 million vehicle miles travelled), the US is sitting at around 33, Canada is about 22, and the UK.....? 8. So basically a motorcyclist in the states is around 4 times as likely to die on a bike than a motorcyclist in the UK.[/QUOTE]

Suggesting that the engine size of a bike that a new rider throws his leg over has a direct relation to his likelihood of dying on it is unrealistic.

Do Canada and the UK have better rider education? Are their drivers better educated, as inattentive or careless cagers are at fault in a significant amount of rider accidents? Are the roads of better quality there?

My point is that there are plenty of factors that could be responsible for the US having a higher rider casualty rate--it's certainly a lot more complex than how big of a bike newbie riders are allowed on.

OneWhoKnows 04-12-2005 03:44 PM

[QUOTE=TheFleshRocket]Suggesting that the engine size of a bike that a new rider throws his leg over has a direct relation to his likelihood of dying on it is unrealistic.[/QUOTE]
It has a direct relation to rider-only accidents and deaths which has increased by ove 200% or some crazy number in the past 4 years.

OneWhoKnows 04-12-2005 03:45 PM

[QUOTE=TheFleshRocket]The only difference between a squid on a 600 and a squid on a 1000 is that the squid on the 1000 is just going to be going a bit faster when he wrecks. While it might be a bit easier to reach excessive speeds on a 10-second bike, it's not that much harder to do so on an 11-second bike. And actually most 600s are dipping into the high 10s now, anyway.[/QUOTE]
Which is why they restrict them to 125/250cc bikes for the first years. Who said 600s? :p

onewheeldoin200 04-12-2005 04:12 PM

[QUOTE=Triden]Excellent faq! :)

Too bad it doesnt apply to my dirtbike :p

How bad is incurance compared to a car? Approximate percentages maybe..[/QUOTE]

It varies wildly, but for full comprehensive on a sport bike you're looking at roughly 50% more than your car (say if you have a $25k car).

Again, it varies hugely. It's really hard to pin down numbers unless you get into specifics, but as a general rule: as rider age goes down and cc's go up, price increases exponentially.

edit: but liability only is cheap. The reason motorcycle insurance is expensive is because ass:tard:s keep crashing and claiming insurance/kill themselves.

[QUOTE=TheFleshRocket]Suggesting that the engine size of a bike that a new rider throws his leg over has a direct relation to his likelihood of dying on it is unrealistic.

Do Canada and the UK have better rider education? Are their drivers better educated, as inattentive or careless cagers are at fault in a significant amount of rider accidents? Are the roads of better quality there?

My point is that there are plenty of factors that could be responsible for the US having a higher rider casualty rate--it's certainly a lot more complex than how big of a bike newbie riders are allowed on.[/QUOTE]

Dude are you kidding me? Some kid on a 1000cc Gixxer will have an enourmously higher chance of crashing than that same kid on an ex250. By the same token, a baby boomer who decides it's time to get into motorcycles and buys a Fat Boy right off the bat has a way higher chance of crashing than if he were to go with that Rebel 250. In fact, middle aged men are the largest death statistic at this point. "I've been driving for 20 years, I don't need to start on a girly bike".

Well, I don't know if Canada has any better rider (and driver) education, but the UK DEFINITELY does. Just pick up a copy of T.W.O.. They view motorcycling completely differently over there.
Our roads in Canada are way worse though, especially in the praries (lol...we can't even keep them maintained, let alone add safety features like ShellGrip).
And helmet laws in the US (or lack thereof) do account for a good number of those deaths. If Canada let people ride around without a lid our death stat would likely be right up around that of the US.

I agree that there are many factors in death statistics, but bike size *IS* a huge one. I mean...that's the whole point of this thread: choosing appropriate beginner bikes. Bikes that won't kill their rider if the rider is hamfisted on the throttle or lacks experience to judge corners.

TheFleshRocket 04-12-2005 06:57 PM

You can misjudge a corner regardless of the size of bike you're on. You can come into a 30mph corner at 60+mph on anything from an R1 to a Rebel 250. As far as being hamfisted on the throttle, yeah, obviously a lower-torque bike will present less of a hazard. However, I never really had any problem with unwanted throttle inputs even when I was a n00b, so maybe that's why I have a hard time really putting any credence in that.

Like I've said before, I think that a restrained, intelligent rider can start out on just about anything on two wheels and be just fine, but certainly having a tamer bike is a better idea for the majority of new riders.

I do agree that helmets probably have a significant effect on the percentage of rider crashes that result in fatalities. Of course, I still don't wear my lid all the time, but c'est la vie.

electric!sheep 04-12-2005 09:02 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]Those bikes are :cool:

They have a really high seat though do they not?[/QUOTE]

They are pretty tall, you need to be around 6' to touch the ground solidly with both feet.

Bolix 04-12-2005 09:04 PM

Badass guide thanks alot! I hope to take the MSF course this summer, or later this year once I get to college. I am really looking forward to picking up a Ninja 250

SebTheDJ 04-12-2005 10:31 PM

Kawasaki Ninja ZX6E is a good potental for a begginers bike. ITs a 600CC sport tourer.

SebTheDJ 04-12-2005 10:32 PM

I wave to everybody, any biker out there.

Most of the times, its the harley people that dont wave back.

TheJesus 04-13-2005 03:53 AM

God damn, I want to get one, but my parents would fucking flip.

I have a question though, I'm a big motherfucker, and whenever I have tried just sizing myself on smaller bikes, I have found myself hunching over uncomfortably. I'm 6'1" and 245ish pounds, so I am wondering what kind of beginning beginning beginning bike would be good for me.

onewheeldoin200 04-13-2005 07:30 AM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]God damn, I want to get one, but my parents would fucking flip.

I have a question though, I'm a big motherfucker, and whenever I have tried just sizing myself on smaller bikes, I have found myself hunching over uncomfortably. I'm 6'1" and 245ish pounds, so I am wondering what kind of beginning beginning beginning bike would be good for me.[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=ph00ny]what about people that are way too tall/big to be riding in small bikes?[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]If size is an issue you'll probably need a sub-1000cc cruiser of some sort. My dad has a Suzuki Volusia 800, for instance, and it's very friendly and manageable. It might be a little heavy, but if you're too big for the bikes above then a little weight shouldn't be an issue. The advantage of cruisers is the HUGE array of accessories for them; you can stretch out with highway bars, add floorboards etc etc.

Other good options in this category are older Yamaha Virago's and Honda Magna's.[/QUOTE]
:)

TheJesus 04-13-2005 07:33 AM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]:)[/QUOTE]

I donno, cruiser just doesn't seem my style, if you get me.

TheFleshRocket 04-13-2005 07:37 AM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]God damn, I want to get one, but my parents would fucking flip.

I have a question though, I'm a big motherfucker, and whenever I have tried just sizing myself on smaller bikes, I have found myself hunching over uncomfortably. I'm 6'1" and 245ish pounds, so I am wondering what kind of beginning beginning beginning bike would be good for me.[/QUOTE]

My parents told me not to get a bike back when I was in college, so I just saved up every penny I could for a semester and bought one anyway. They were a bit pissy for a while, but when they realized I was serious about riding, they calmed down. I still get the "wear your gear and don't speed" lectures, but that's to be expected.

You'll probably want to start out on something a bit torquier than the average Ninja 250/500. The SV650 should fit the bill pretty nicely. You're not HUGE, so the bike's not going to be terribly slow by any means. You'll still be riding a bike that can click off low 12-second 1/4 mile times even with you on it, and top out around 135ish. My F2 didn't feel particularly slow, even saddled with about 200lbs of me and ~130lbs of passenger so the SV650 should do the trick for you. A Ninja 500 might be okay for you too, but you'll positively dwarf a 250.

A lot of the bigger guys I know graduate to liter-class twins, simply because they have some of the best low-end grunt this side of a large-displacement cruiser.

If you're looking into a cruiser as a starter bike instead, I'd recommend something around 800ccs since cruiser motors usually make about 1/2 to 2/3 the horsepower of a comparably sized sportbike engine.

TheFleshRocket 04-13-2005 08:02 AM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]I donno, cruiser just doesn't seem my style, if you get me.[/QUOTE]

If the SV650 is too sporty for you, perhaps you should look at a sport-standard. The Suzuki Bandit 600 offers more-upright ergoes and puts down around 75rwhp so it should be enough to get you moving but not be too dangerous. Then there's the Yamaha FZ6, which is basically an R6 with the engine tuned a bit more for torque, less plastic on it, and more comfortable ergoes. It puts down low 90s rwhp IIRC. It's a bit sportier and faster than the Bandit, and some of the guys here will argue that it's too much bike for a beginner.

If you like the idea of the SV650's torquey Vtwin but want a more comfortable chassis, Suzuki has stuffed that motor into the VStrom, which has much-more comfortable ergoes. It's a bit.. weird looking, but it ought to fit the bill for you as a rider.

[url]http://www.suzukicycles.com/Products/DL650K5/Default.aspx[/url]

[img]http://www.suzukicycles.com/images/ProductImages/logo/500/DL650K5.jpg[/img]

TheFleshRocket 04-13-2005 08:14 AM

[QUOTE=///M3]I wave to everybody, any biker out there.
Most of the times, its the harley people that dont wave back.[/QUOTE]

I get that too, even when I'm on my cruiser. However, I think it's more because they don't pay as much attention rather than purposely trying to be rude. It's not like they look over at me and then choose not to wave; more often than not they just don't even look at me, like they've got their blinders on or something.

TheJesus 04-13-2005 11:25 AM

[QUOTE=TheFleshRocket]If the SV650 is too sporty for you, perhaps you should look at a sport-standard. The Suzuki Bandit 600 offers more-upright ergoes and puts down around 75rwhp so it should be enough to get you moving but not be too dangerous. Then there's the Yamaha FZ6, which is basically an R6 with the engine tuned a bit more for torque, less plastic on it, and more comfortable ergoes. It puts down low 90s rwhp IIRC. It's a bit sportier and faster than the Bandit, and some of the guys here will argue that it's too much bike for a beginner.

If you like the idea of the SV650's torquey Vtwin but want a more comfortable chassis, Suzuki has stuffed that motor into the VStrom, which has much-more comfortable ergoes. It's a bit.. weird looking, but it ought to fit the bill for you as a rider.

[url]http://www.suzukicycles.com/Products/DL650K5/Default.aspx[/url]

[img]http://www.suzukicycles.com/images/ProductImages/logo/500/DL650K5.jpg[/img][/QUOTE]

Can you explain this a little more. I really want to know more.

TheJesus 04-13-2005 11:31 AM

Also, I need to know how much my insurance would be on one of these things, as an 18 year old male.

onewheeldoin200 04-13-2005 12:16 PM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]Also, I need to know how much my insurance would be on one of these things, as an 18 year old male.[/QUOTE]

Private insurane will be pretty expensive :( Your best bet is probably to just get liability and assume all damages to your your own bike out of pocket. The best thing to do is start calling around and getting quotes.

The V-Strom is in a class of bike called "Sport Adventure Touring"....which basically means it's made to do lots of highway, but isn't afraid of a few gravel/dirt roads. There's a nice little review on it here: [url]http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/DL650.html[/url]

To get that 650 though you'l have to buy either brand new or a year old I think. It used to only come with the 1000cc engine.

Additionally, you COULD buy riser handlebars and lower rearsets for that sv650 that would let you stretch out a bit. It would still be more than enough motor for you.

TheJesus 04-13-2005 01:01 PM

[QUOTE]I spend some years on GSXR-1100s, and this bike is more fun. Fewer religious experiences, however: on the GSXR, Jesus is there in most corners, and he's got a personal message for you. With this bike, you just ride and have fun.[/QUOTE]

That sounds good.

onewheeldoin200 04-13-2005 02:44 PM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]That sounds good.[/QUOTE]

Wow on first read I thought you meant you wanted to get a GSXR1100 :lol:

I was about to jump down your throat OMGWTFBBQ :o

:heart:

TheJesus 04-13-2005 05:56 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]Wow on first read I thought you meant you wanted to get a GSXR1100 :lol:

I was about to jump down your throat OMGWTFBBQ :o

:heart:[/QUOTE]

:lol: I'm fucking dumb, but not that fucking dumb.

:heart:

Any other advice that you guys can give me? How to price shop? Where should I look locally for good deals? How hard is the licencing part? Registration and stuff like that? I really want to get something that I can ease into riding, and have fun with. Thanks guys, I know I am annoying as shit.

ph00ny 04-13-2005 07:51 PM

I'm only 6'2"/215lb but i have a lot of trouble fitting into convertibles (350z, crossfire, s2k, slk, tt....). Friend of mine told me (Rdier) once told me that i wouldn't be able to ride 600cc sports bikes due to my size

onewheeldoin200 04-13-2005 07:57 PM

[QUOTE=ph00ny]I'm only 6'2"/215lb but i have a lot of trouble fitting into convertibles (350z, crossfire, s2k, slk, tt....). Friend of mine told me (Rdier) once told me that i wouldn't be able to ride 600cc sports bikes due to my size[/QUOTE]

He's full of shit. Look at a lot of testers in the magazines. Mitch Boehm (Sport Rider..I think?) is over 6' and 190lbs+, and he does just fine. Now, you might feel a little cramped on a 600 (or the newest gen litre bikes; they're tiny), but you're not too big for them. Now..if you were 6'6 and 280....well then it would be a tougher sell :p

onewheeldoin200 04-13-2005 07:58 PM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]:lol: I'm fucking dumb, but not that fucking dumb.

:heart:

Any other advice that you guys can give me? How to price shop? Where should I look locally for good deals? How hard is the licencing part? Registration and stuff like that? I really want to get something that I can ease into riding, and have fun with. Thanks guys, I know I am annoying as shit.[/QUOTE]

Well, I can't say much here because all this varies with respect to region. There's tips above for finding used bikes, and you should look up the website for your state/province's DMV to check the out the licensing and registration procedure. Time to do some readin ;)

TheJesus 04-13-2005 08:01 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]Well, I can't say much here because all this varies with respect to region. There's tips above for finding used bikes, and you should look up the website for your state/province's DMV to check the out the licensing and registration procedure. Time to do some readin ;)[/QUOTE]

Been doing that all day. I've been talking to Detman for a bit, and he gave me a guy to call. I donno, I really am excited.

onewheeldoin200 04-13-2005 08:04 PM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]Been doing that all day. I've been talking to Detman for a bit, and he gave me a guy to call. I donno, I really am excited.[/QUOTE]

:D Awesome. Good luck with getting setup!

edit: and feel free to PM/email me any time. If there's anything I can help with, I'll give it a go.

SebTheDJ 04-13-2005 09:03 PM

Im 6'1 225 lbs and my mom told i look to big on my bike....LOL my bike is huge compared to a 600RR

onewheeldoin200 04-13-2005 09:45 PM

[QUOTE=///M3]Im 6'1 225 lbs and my mom told i look to big on my bike....LOL my bike is huge compared to a 600RR[/QUOTE]

lol yeah the new ones do feel rather like toys after straddling an old school rocket :cool:

Applejuice 04-14-2005 02:19 AM

That reminds me, the thing I hate most about my bike, is when someone asks me what I ride, I have to say "04 CBR 600RR." Can't just give em something simple like "a gixxer".

Accident Prone 04-14-2005 09:04 AM

What are some good websites for articles on how to ride, safety tips, newbie articles, and such?

I've been told to take an MSF course to learn, but I'm not spending the money.
I have a friend that is gonna teach me, but he might not tell me everything I need to know. So I'm thinking I should read as much information as I can to go along with his teaching.

onewheeldoin200 04-14-2005 09:50 AM

[QUOTE=Accident Prone]What are some good websites for articles on how to ride, safety tips, newbie articles, and such?

I've been told to take an MSF course to learn, but I'm not spending the money.
I have a friend that is gonna teach me, but he might not tell me everything I need to know. So I'm thinking I should read as much information as I can to go along with his teaching.[/QUOTE]

I'd start with the link at the top of the page....there's a paper in there that I wrote about Canadian safety issues that apply to riding everywhere. Otherwise, I don't really know of a "how to ride" guide online. You'll just need to buy a real beater and spend lots of time in the parking lot going around cones and stopping and starting etc etc. PERFECT YOUR LOW SPEED SKILLS FIRST!!!!

edit: and I know you said you wouldn't spend the money, but I *strongly* recommend that you take that MSF course. You will learn things there that would take you years and/or a few crashes to learn otherwise.

onewheeldoin200 04-14-2005 09:52 AM

[QUOTE=Applejuice]That reminds me, the thing I hate most about my bike, is when someone asks me what I ride, I have to say "04 CBR 600RR." Can't just give em something simple like "a gixxer".[/QUOTE]

That's why Kawis are great; pretty well no matter which bike you buy, they're all "Ninja's" :lol:

s0ad 04-14-2005 01:53 PM

i'm thinking about getting either a 2005 Kawasaki Ninja 250R or a 2005 Kawasaki EX500 this summer, but i don't know if i can scrounge up enough cash.

TheFleshRocket 04-14-2005 09:46 PM

[QUOTE=s0ad]i'm thinking about getting either a 2005 Kawasaki Ninja 250R or a 2005 Kawasaki EX500 this summer, but i don't know if i can scrounge up enough cash.[/QUOTE]

You really REALLY don't want to buy a new bike for your first bike. You'll get raped on new-bike depreciation as well as whatever damage you do to it.

Do yourself a favor and buy a USED Ninja 250 or 500 for a lot less than a new one and save the rest of the money towards buying a 600 or bigger when you are good enough to ride one.

TheJesus 04-14-2005 11:43 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]:D Awesome. Good luck with getting setup!

edit: and feel free to PM/email me any time. If there's anything I can help with, I'll give it a go.[/QUOTE]

Can you tell me more about the insurance thing you were talking about? I'm having trouble getting a straight awnser from everyone I've asked about it, and I figure you'd tell me the truth.

Been looking at SV 650

edit: damn letters

onewheeldoin200 04-15-2005 12:13 AM

[QUOTE=TheJesus]Can you tell me more about the insurance thing you were talking about? I'm having trouble getting a straight awnser from everyone I've asked about it, and I figure you'd tell me the truth.

Been looking at SV 650

edit: damn letters[/QUOTE]

This??? :confused:
[quote]Private insurane will be pretty expensive Your best bet is probably to just get liability and assume all damages to your your own bike out of pocket. The best thing to do is start calling around and getting quotes.[/quote]

Well, because bikes are so prone to crashing, the major cost to insurance companies is claims on damage to the bike. This is pretty well the inverse of cars, where liability is the big issue.

As an example: I bought my zx-6 rat bike for $1800. After fixing it up and all it was worth $2500 on a good day. Full comprehensive coverage for my bike would've been around $2000 a year, while liability was only around $600 for a year. I got ONLY liability, meaning that if I drop/crash the bike then that cost comes out of my own pocket.

Now, something you'll have to watch out very carefully for is theft if you go this route: you can't leave your bike at movie theatres, you can't leave it outside at night, and in some areas you can't even leave it out at your work. If this is going to be your primary transportation you will, at the very least, need a disc brake lock, and preferably an alarm. My bike was such a piece that I rarely worried about it, and an SV is probably pretty safe, but a gixxer or a cbr would get stolen very quickly if left unattended.

So yeah, if you're getting quotes for full-comp that would cover the cost of your entire bike in a year or two, just go with liability and be extra careful both in your riding and how you park the bike.

I hope I got the right question btw :lol: I'll be choked if I typed this shit for nothing :p

TheJesus 04-15-2005 01:02 AM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]This??? :confused:


Well, because bikes are so prone to crashing, the major cost to insurance companies is claims on damage to the bike. This is pretty well the inverse of cars, where liability is the big issue.

As an example: I bought my zx-6 rat bike for $1800. After fixing it up and all it was worth $2500 on a good day. Full comprehensive coverage for my bike would've been around $2000 a year, while liability was only around $600 for a year. I got ONLY liability, meaning that if I drop/crash the bike then that cost comes out of my own pocket.

Now, something you'll have to watch out very carefully for is theft if you go this route: you can't leave your bike at movie theatres, you can't leave it outside at night, and in some areas you can't even leave it out at your work. If this is going to be your primary transportation you will, at the very least, need a disc brake lock, and preferably an alarm. My bike was such a piece that I rarely worried about it, and an SV is probably pretty safe, but a gixxer or a cbr would get stolen very quickly if left unattended.

So yeah, if you're getting quotes for full-comp that would cover the cost of your entire bike in a year or two, just go with liability and be extra careful both in your riding and how you park the bike.

I hope I got the right question btw :lol: I'll be choked if I typed this shit for nothing :p[/QUOTE]
I got ya, should I call my state farm agent that I am on good terms with to check this out?

Oh, and when are the '06's coming out, I want a price drop on the 99-00's

Accident Prone 04-15-2005 09:00 AM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]
Now, something you'll have to watch out very carefully for is theft if you go this route: you can't leave your bike at movie theatres, you can't leave it outside at night, and in some areas you can't even leave it out at your work. If this is going to be your primary transportation you will, at the very least, need a disc brake lock, and preferably an alarm. My bike was such a piece that I rarely worried about it, and an SV is probably pretty safe, but a gixxer or a cbr would get stolen very quickly if left unattended.
[/QUOTE]

I am going to be leaving my ninja 250 unatteneded when i go to work 8-midnight.
I'm on a college campus during the summer which means like 1 cop to every 10 people.

Should I look into full coverage insurance or an alarm or just dont worry about it?

onewheeldoin200 04-15-2005 09:29 AM

[QUOTE=Accident Prone]I am going to be leaving my ninja 250 unatteneded when i go to work 8-midnight.
I'm on a college campus during the summer which means like 1 cop to every 10 people.

Should I look into full coverage insurance or an alarm or just dont worry about it?[/QUOTE]

Is there something you can use as a ground anchor? Like one of those U-shaped crash bars around fire hydrants or something? I think that would be most economical. Failing that a disc lock should be okay.

The most important factor, though, is how the bike looks. Is it pretty well brand new or is it early nineties? Most thieves wouldn't bother with a 250 unless it was basically off the showroom floor.

s0ad 04-15-2005 03:01 PM

[QUOTE=TheFleshRocket]You really REALLY don't want to buy a new bike for your first bike. You'll get raped on new-bike depreciation as well as whatever damage you do to it.

Do yourself a favor and buy a USED Ninja 250 or 500 for a lot less than a new one and save the rest of the money towards buying a 600 or bigger when you are good enough to ride one.[/QUOTE]

i can't find any used ninja 250's or 500's around my area. What do you mean i'll get raped by new-bike depreciation? i did a quote for progressive insur. for the 05 Ninja 250R, and it came out to around $140 a month with


Bodily Injury, Property Damage and Guest Passenger Coverage $12,500 person/$25,000 accident/$7,500 property damage
Uninsured/ Underinsured Motorists Bodily Injury Coverage $12,500 person/$25,000 accident
Medical Payments Coverage $1,000 each person
Uninsured Motorists Property Damage Coverage No coverage
Comprehensive Coverage $1,000 Deductible
Collision Coverage $1,000 Deductible
Roadside Assistance Coverage No coverage
Custom Parts and Equipment Coverage $1,000

Accident Prone 04-15-2005 03:09 PM

[QUOTE=s0ad]i can't find any used ninja 250's or 500's around me. What do you mean i'll get raped by new-bike depreciation?[/QUOTE]
If you drive it for a month, it's value drops by $1000.
If you drop it once, it's value drops by $2000.

Also, I had trouble finding one too. Just wait it out on ebay. Eventually there will be one within a reasonable driving distance of you (unless you live in antartica).

SVTGMoney 04-16-2005 12:40 PM

I'm considering starting on an older 600cc sport bike, but still havn't decided between an ex500 and a 600cc. I'm a pretty big guy, 6'2" 225lbs, and I'm thinkin between a CBR600 F3 and a YZF-600, thoughts on the two and will the ex500 be enough for my size?

SebTheDJ 04-16-2005 02:04 PM

F3's are pretty nice bikes. I would recommend one as a first bike.

onewheeldoin200 04-16-2005 02:18 PM

[QUOTE=SVTGMoney]I'm considering starting on an older 600cc sport bike, but still havn't decided between an ex500 and a 600cc. I'm a pretty big guy, 6'2" 225lbs, and I'm thinkin between a CBR600 F3 and a YZF-600, thoughts on the two and will the ex500 be enough for my size?[/QUOTE]

If you weighed 120lbs I'd say hell no....at 225....well, then it starts to become a decision on your part of how steep you'd like your learning curve to be. That ex500 will make you quicker than almost any car on the road (any factory stock car, really). The F3 and YZF are great bikes, but they do put out ~90hp, or 40hp more than that ex500, which is almost twice as much. Insurance will be more expensive, and you'll be at greater risk of theft.

Really, it comes down to your decision: if you don't mind a little extra outlay of cash (moreso with insurance than buying the bike) and you think you can excercise a lot of restraint while you gain experience, then both would be great bikes for you.

leadmetal1402 04-16-2005 03:28 PM

hey guys, i'm a faggot and a :tard: look at me!

onewheeldoin200 04-16-2005 03:59 PM

[QUOTE=leadmetal1402]bikes are for pussy faggots. why is this sticky like anybody gives a flying shit?[/QUOTE]

:cran: get out of my thread asshat 29k :tard: faggot

bikes > you

ReTECH 04-17-2005 09:00 PM

Of intrest to beginner bikers with lots of plastic, I've read that the frame sliders do, and do not, help save body work in a slow or standing drop. Any thoughts on this? Any good places to get `em for the beginner bikes listed here?

onewheeldoin200 04-17-2005 09:29 PM

[QUOTE=ReTECH]Of intrest to beginner bikers with lots of plastic, I've read that the frame sliders do, and do not, help save body work in a slow or standing drop. Any thoughts on this? Any good places to get `em for the beginner bikes listed here?[/QUOTE]

Well, they certainly save the bodywork from being destroyed completely (scratches are a lot better than shattering it), so it can just be repainted or left as is instead of replaced, and it also protects the handlebars and clutch/brake levers from getting tweaked. Handlbars are like $80 a piece minimum, and they break easily. With some bikes, if you break the clutch/brake lever, you have to replace the whole unit, not just the lever itself. $$$

I haven't bought any yet myself, so I can't really recommend a good place to buy em. :confused:

nonhuman 04-19-2005 06:55 PM

How realistic would a bike be as a sole means of transportation in the city? I've been toying with the idea for a while since a 250 seems cheaper in the long run (price, maintenance, gas, insurance... right?) than a car. What worries me the most, though, is that it wouldn't work too well in the winter.

onewheeldoin200 04-19-2005 08:12 PM

[QUOTE=nonhuman]How realistic would a bike be as a sole means of transportation in the city? I've been toying with the idea for a while since a 250 seems cheaper in the long run (price, maintenance, gas, insurance... right?) than a car. What worries me the most, though, is that it wouldn't work too well in the winter.[/QUOTE]

I will tell you this; sport radials mix VERY poorly with anything even related to ice. Unless you can fit some studded tires or something (and dress up like an eskimo) you won't be happy on a bike during winter.

If you lived in California though it might almost be practical.

edit: and yes, a 250 is VERY cheap to own and operate. Usually full comprehensive is under a grand/year, they never break, and it gets almost 80mpg.

nonhuman 04-19-2005 08:38 PM

Montreal :( (or perhaps maybe Boston, depends on what college I go to)

To be honest, even though I live right near Boston, I haven't really looked at city streets during winter much. I thought that they don't hold snow or ice for long due to the traffic, though.

edit: Also heard that carbed bikes are a PITA to start in the cold. True?

Ignited 04-19-2005 11:22 PM

I'm a pretty small guy. I'm a good height (5'10"), but I'm barely pushing 140 lbs. Anyways, I'm on the market for a bike and I've had my eye on the Suzuki SV650S. I am absolutely enamored with this bike, but after doing some research, I'm worried that I'll have a difficult time handling it. Basically, I'm worried that it will be too heavy for me.

Can somebody weigh in on this and give their opinion? I don't mean to sound stubborn, but I REALLY have my heart set on this bike and I really want to get it, but if I simply won't be able to handle it then I need to know.

onewheeldoin200 04-20-2005 10:06 AM

[QUOTE=nonhuman]Montreal :( (or perhaps maybe Boston, depends on what college I go to)

To be honest, even though I live right near Boston, I haven't really looked at city streets during winter much. I thought that they don't hold snow or ice for long due to the traffic, though.

edit: Also heard that carbed bikes are a PITA to start in the cold. True?[/QUOTE]
Montreal often sees what...-20 or -30C in the winter? I don't think I'd advise riding a street bike in cold like that. And yes, carbs can be pretty hit and miss in cold weather. If you can get them started you also have to wait for them to get good and warm (at least 5 mins idling depending on how cold it is), or else they can stutter and lose power, which can be less than safe at a busy intersection.

[QUOTE=Ignited]I'm a pretty small guy. I'm a good height (5'10"), but I'm barely pushing 140 lbs. Anyways, I'm on the market for a bike and I've had my eye on the Suzuki SV650S. I am absolutely enamored with this bike, but after doing some research, I'm worried that I'll have a difficult time handling it. Basically, I'm worried that it will be too heavy for me.

Can somebody weigh in on this and give their opinion? I don't mean to sound stubborn, but I REALLY have my heart set on this bike and I really want to get it, but if I simply won't be able to handle it then I need to know.[/QUOTE]
How about this as a compromise: buy a mid 80's standard bike as a beater for your first summer, then [i]next[/i] year go back and get that SV. Standards have lower seat heights, and a bike from the 80's is probably a little under the weather anyways, so if you DO drop it it won't be a big deal.

You will cry if/when you drop that beautiful new SV, and it's easy to do for a beginner on a bike where only your toes touch the ground :o

Anyways, the SV is about as light a bike as you can get that's over 500cc. If it starts to tip you should be able to catch it if you're on the ball....but I still recommend learning on a bike with a low seat, so that you can have both feet firmly planted for leverage, and lighter weight ( a 250 would be ideal for your first few times on a bike...take an MSF course! They'll usually provide 250's for you to use.) If you were to take an MSF course and get at least a little bit of riding time I'd be less inclined to steer you away from the SV, but for an absolute beginner there's no question that it's a lot of bike to handle (more in terms of power than weight, really).

Ignited 04-20-2005 10:15 AM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]How about this as a compromise: buy a mid 80's standard bike as a beater for your first summer, then [i]next[/i] year go back and get that SV. Standards have lower seat heights, and a bike from the 80's is probably a little under the weather anyways, so if you DO drop it it won't be a big deal.

You will cry if/when you drop that beautiful new SV, and it's easy to do for a beginner on a bike where only your toes touch the ground :o

Anyways, the SV is about as light a bike as you can get that's over 500cc. If it starts to tip you should be able to catch it if you're on the ball....but I still recommend learning on a bike with a low seat, so that you can have both feet firmly planted for leverage, and lighter weight ( a 250 would be ideal for your first few times on a bike...take an MSF course! They'll usually provide 250's for you to use.) If you were to take an MSF course and get at least a little bit of riding time I'd be less inclined to steer you away from the SV, but for an absolute beginner there's no question that it's a lot of bike to handle (more in terms of power than weight, really).[/QUOTE]

Awesome, man. I really appreciate the advice! Hahaha but I'm in love with that SV! Ah well, I still have a while to think about it and explore some more options. Thanks again.

ReaperKK 04-20-2005 06:04 PM

Wow this thread is great. I'm 18 and I took MSF and got a GS500 and I love it, I can't complain. I don't think I will ever stop riding it. As for frame sliders their are none available but a guy over at the gstwin forums is making some for the new models of the GS500 so I can wait to get mine.

s0ad 04-20-2005 07:49 PM

what are the limitations/restrictions of a motorcycle permit? like with a car driving permit if you're under 18 or whatever you can only drive with a parent or whoever over 21. Is there stuff like that for motorcycles?

ReTECH 04-20-2005 10:14 PM

[QUOTE=s0ad]what are the limitations/restrictions of a motorcycle permit? like with a car driving permit if you're under 18 or whatever you can only drive with a parent or whoever over 21. Is there stuff like that for motorcycles?[/QUOTE]
Depends on your state. WA recently changed ours. Currently it's no passengers & no night riding. I think it was previously those 2 plus no freeways, but I'm not positive.

Stajerker 04-21-2005 04:34 PM

I'm thinking of buying my first bike this summer (I'm 18 turning 19 this summer), and I live in Ontario. I've been looking for the beginner bikes recommended at the beginning of this thread, and I really havent been able to find many.
The bikes that I've been encountering (that look appealing to me, I would like a sporty looking bike, I will not buy a too-powerful bike to start, I dont want to die) some late 80s/early 90s 600cc sportbikes (mainly Honda CBR's - Hurricanes (what does that mean) and F1, F2 models), or 500cc Honda Interceptors (im not considering the 750cc ones, too powerful I think) i've also found a couple Yamaha RZ350's and one or two Kawasaki EX500's.

What one of these bikes would be a good choice? are they all too much power too handle? I'm 6'3", and 210lbs, so would I even be abled to fit on a bike?

Also, how long do bikes last? Alot of the late 80's bikes have upwards or 50-60 thousand km;s on them, will they last?

Lastly, is thier something equal to the MSF course in Ontario that I can take?? I dont think that they offer the MSF course here...

onewheeldoin200 04-21-2005 09:53 PM

[QUOTE=Stajerker]I'm thinking of buying my first bike this summer (I'm 18 turning 19 this summer), and I live in Ontario. I've been looking for the beginner bikes recommended at the beginning of this thread, and I really havent been able to find many.
The bikes that I've been encountering (that look appealing to me, I would like a sporty looking bike, I will not buy a too-powerful bike to start, I dont want to die) some late 80s/early 90s 600cc sportbikes (mainly Honda CBR's - Hurricanes (what does that mean) and F1, F2 models), or 500cc Honda Interceptors (im not considering the 750cc ones, too powerful I think) i've also found a couple Yamaha RZ350's and one or two Kawasaki EX500's.

What one of these bikes would be a good choice? are they all too much power too handle? I'm 6'3", and 210lbs, so would I even be abled to fit on a bike?

Also, how long do bikes last? Alot of the late 80's bikes have upwards or 50-60 thousand km;s on them, will they last?

Lastly, is thier something equal to the MSF course in Ontario that I can take?? I dont think that they offer the MSF course here...[/QUOTE]

Well, here's a place to start for safety courses: [url]http://www.ridertraining.ca/M1X-description.html[/url]
[url]http://www.rideomsa.com/[/url]

As for the bikes, any older bike 600cc or smaller is probably fine, especially since you're not exactly a twig. I'd recommend the ex500 as probably the best overall though. Because it's techincally under 500cc, you should probably save a good deal on insurance, too.

Bikes are much higher maintenance than cars, obviously. 50 000km can be a LOT for a bike that isn't kept up. Mind you, I've seen BMW's and Kawasaki Concours and the like with upwards of 200 000km on them. With anything more than 20 000km, there's probably going to be some things you'll have to fix. I would look very closely at brake wear (rotors too), chains and sprockets, bearings(are they worn/loose), cable and hydraulic housings (deep cracks = replace and drain + bleed hydraulics), etc etc. Other things like valve clearances and whatnot are harder to check, but keep in mind that most bikes need valve adjustments every 15 000km or so. Get someone who really knows their stuff to come with you when you go looking and get them to take the bike for a spin. They should be able to get a good idea of what kind of shape the thing is in.

Hope that helps.

Stajerker 04-22-2005 11:26 AM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]Well, here's a place to start for safety courses: [url]http://www.ridertraining.ca/M1X-description.html[/url]
[url]http://www.rideomsa.com/[/url]
snip...
Get someone who really knows their stuff to come with you when you go looking and get them to take the bike for a spin. They should be able to get a good idea of what kind of shape the thing is in.

Hope that helps.[/QUOTE]

Well, herein lies the problem. I know ONE person who rides, and he is the dad of a guy (not even really a freind) I know. I highly doubt he'd do it, we've never got on very well (If I DO find a bike in the area though I will ask him, cant hurt, and he currently rides an R6, so he knows how to ride sportbikes). I was wondering if there would be somewhere I could take the bike in...but if I cant drive it there, I wonder how to get it there? Would the seller ride it there for me, and I could follow in a car?

Thanks ALOT for the help though. If I cant possibly get it checked out, if the seller has reciepts for work done/maintenance records, would that suffice? I will definatly take one of the courses you linked before, so by the time I'm purchasing a bike, I will have my M2, but I doubt the seller would let some random kid who doesnt own a bike go anywhere on the bike, and even if he did, I doubt i'd know if something wasnt working right.

edit: I'm very mechanically inclined...and with a manual, I'm pretty sure I could fix almost anything...so the jobs of brakes and clutch cable and other stuff I could do in due time by myself.

ReTECH 04-22-2005 08:01 PM

I would say, if you can't possibly get it checked out, it's not time to get a (used) bike yet...

Figure out a way to make friends with people that specifically have bikes. Go to bike shops & try to chat up the mechanics. Sure you'll get tossed out of some, or given the cold shoulder, but someone will be nice. If you can't / won't / whatever, make biker contacts, you're taking a gamble buying used. Maybe you'll win, maybe not.

$0.02

edit: Once you have a shop lined up, just ask any potential seller to meet you there. Do arrange it with the shop beforehand, though.

Ignited 04-23-2005 12:10 AM

[QUOTE=///M3]I wave to everybody, any biker out there.[/QUOTE]

This is something that I'm really looking forward to when I start riding. :)

OneWhoKnows 04-24-2005 10:20 AM

[QUOTE=Ignited]This is something that I'm really looking forward to when I start riding. :)[/QUOTE]
I even wave to the people riding scooters - they seems to get a kick out of it and wave all happy-like.

electric!sheep 04-24-2005 10:53 AM

[QUOTE=OneWhoKnows]I even wave to the people riding scooters - they seems to get a kick out of it and wave all happy-like.[/QUOTE]

I had a dude on a sportbike wave to me and a buddy when we were riding down a hill on road bikes at 35mph. :D

VulcaN 04-24-2005 11:12 AM

I wove to a cop on a bike once and he turned around and started to write a ticket but changed his mind once he saw me wearing full gear and probably the fact that I was really polite. At least I didnt make fun of his oil leaker heh

OneWhoKnows 04-24-2005 11:29 AM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]I wove to a cop on a bike once and he turned around and started to write a ticket but changed his mind once he saw me wearing full gear and probably the fact that I was really polite. At least I didnt make fun of his oil leaker heh[/QUOTE]
He pulled you over for waving to him? :wtf:

SebTheDJ 04-24-2005 01:15 PM

[QUOTE=OneWhoKnows]He pulled you over for waving to him? :wtf:[/QUOTE]


WTF is what im thinking too.

VulcaN 04-24-2005 02:05 PM

At least here its a ticketable offense, you have to keep both hands on the controls at all times.

ReTECH 04-24-2005 03:13 PM

Wow, I never heard of that, that really sucks. Not to mention it's a stupid law...
What state?

VulcaN 04-24-2005 03:24 PM

washington DC

Ignited 04-25-2005 11:48 PM

Now let's talk cruisers...

As I've stated before, I'm weeks away from purchasing my first motorcycle. At first I really wanted a sport bike, but after much consideration, I just don't think I'm the sport bike type. I want something comfortable that I can take on long trips, and I've always been more attracted to cruisers anyways. I've been looking at the Yamaha V Star 650 Custom. It's got a 645cc, 40 cubic inch engine, which I think is pretty good. Here's a picture for reference.

[IMG]http://img250.echo.cx/img250/8616/05yamahavstarcustom9us.jpg[/IMG]

I really like this bike and I think it'll make a good first cruiser. However, I'm afraid that I'll outgrow it too soon. Three months after buying it, I don't want to be wishing I had something bigger that could keep up on the highway, but I don't want something too big either. But for as cool as it looks and as well-priced as it is, it would be hard to turn down. Can anybody weight in on this?

VulcaN 04-25-2005 11:49 PM

perhaps a sport-tourer?

ReTECH 04-26-2005 08:51 AM

[QUOTE=Ignited]Now let's talk cruisers...

As I've stated before, I'm weeks away from purchasing my first motorcycle. At first I really wanted a sport bike, but after much consideration, I just don't think I'm the sport bike type. I want something comfortable that I can take on long trips, and I've always been more attracted to cruisers anyways. I've been looking at the Yamaha V Star 650 Custom. It's got a 645cc, 40 cubic inch engine, which I think is pretty good. Here's a picture for reference.

IMG]http://img250.echo.cx/img250/8616/05yamahavstarcustom9us.jpg[/IMG

I really like this bike and I think it'll make a good first cruiser. However, I'm afraid that I'll outgrow it too soon. Three months after buying it, I don't want to be wishing I had something bigger that could keep up on the highway, but I don't want something too big either. But for as cool as it looks and as well-priced as it is, it would be hard to turn down. Can anybody weight in on this?[/QUOTE]
On the low-powered end, it's undeniably possible to get a cruiser that's too wimpy. (*Thinks of Honda Rebel.) However, I don't think the V star will let you down, especially as a new rider. My `80 XJ650 keeps up on the freeway just fine, & can 'beat' 60%+ cars I encounter on the road. This bike will do much better than that. The only catch is where you say you really wanted a sportbike, then switched up... You didn't go into what that was all about.

Vulcan's tip is very good, but AFAIK the sport tourers will cost a fair bit more, & you mention 'well-priced'. Another good option is to get a used cruiser, maybe even a total beater. As a new rider, you have an equal chance on *ALL* types of bike to do body damage by dropping it either parked, moving but not actually riding, or even very low speed accidents. That chance, specifically, is very close to 100%. This is not even accounting for 'real' accidents. With a used bike this will suck, but not nearly as bad as with a shiny new one.

Accident Prone 04-26-2005 09:22 AM

[QUOTE=ReTECH]That chance, specifically, is very close to 100%.[/QUOTE] i read the stat in an article somewhere.

80% of new riders drop their bike at least once within the first 6 months

onewheeldoin200 04-26-2005 09:33 AM

[QUOTE=Accident Prone]i read the stat in an article somewhere.

80% of new riders drop their bike at least once within the first 6 months[/QUOTE]

Yeap. A buddy of mine dropped nine grand on a mint condition cbr, then dropped it 4 times over the summer and knocked about $1500 of it's value. Dumbass :lol:

ReTECH 04-26-2005 09:46 AM

So, do any of us know 6+ month experienced bike people who've never dropped a bike? :D

Ignited 04-26-2005 12:41 PM

[QUOTE=ReTECH]The only catch is where you say you really wanted a sportbike, then switched up... You didn't go into what that was all about.[/QUOTE]

Over the weekend I rode my friends GSX-R 750 for a few hours. That thing was just fucking crazy, but what I really didn't like was the riding position. Being hunched over the gas tank isn't something I really want. Not that I was totally stretched out across the thing, but that's not really my idea of a comfortable ride. I love sport bikes, but they're just not for me, at least not until I get a couple years of riding experience under my belt.

OneWhoKnows 04-26-2005 01:29 PM

[QUOTE=ReTECH]So, do any of us know 6+ month experienced bike people who've never dropped a bike? :D[/QUOTE]
I do, but that means they never really rode :cool:

TheFleshRocket 04-26-2005 06:10 PM

[QUOTE=OneWhoKnows]I do, but that means they never really rode :cool:[/QUOTE]

I put 4K miles on my bike, an '89 CBR600F, without wrecking it or dropping it, before I traded up.. I had it at a shop to have the forks looked at because it would bottom out if I hit a bump while braking and they were like "have you actually been riding this bike--there are pieces completely missing from inside the forks!!" I didn't tell them that I'd been scraping pegs on 100+mph sweepers just a few days before. :lol:

And I probably had a good 10K miles on my F2 before I did any real damage to it. So it's not likely that a virgin rider will keep his bike virgin, but it IS possible.

CrucialTK 04-26-2005 06:38 PM

I just got my motorcycle learners permit today. Think I may try to pick up a small cruiser this summer. I can't see myself doing long distances on it, so I'm not worrying about power in the long run. As a point a to b vehicle, it should do fine for me until I can afford a nicer bike

/not remotely considering a sport bike, need to learn first, then speed. Like cars.

Ignited 04-26-2005 10:00 PM

[QUOTE=CrucialTK]I just got my motorcycle learners permit today. Think I may try to pick up a small cruiser this summer. I can't see myself doing long distances on it, so I'm not worrying about power in the long run. As a point a to b vehicle, it should do fine for me until I can afford a nicer bike

/not remotely considering a sport bike, need to learn first, then speed. Like cars.[/QUOTE]

Have you got your eye on a certain bike yet?

electric!sheep 04-26-2005 10:20 PM

This is coming from a recent fanboy convert, but anyone 5'8"+ should consider a Kawasaki KLR 650 (shorter than that and your feet won't touch the ground :p). I've had mine for a few weeks as a first bike and fucking love the thing. First, I dropped it a couple of times when I hit grass and slid the back tire, with no apparent damage. Second, I removed, disassembled, and cleaned the carb on my own thanks to endless web resources available. (Before that I'd done little more than change oil in my car.) Third, it can take dirt or car-eating potholes in stride. Fourth, it can cruise on the highway at 65-90mph all day. Fifth, the USMC uses a diesel conversion of the KLR 650 as its standard motorcycle. Sixth:

[quote]If one of your goals in riding a motorcycle is to be noticed, this is the bike for you. It's got a cool-factor that can't be measured in normal bike terms. Ride one of these things in to downtown $majorcity and everyone stares as you look down on all of them. The military-green paint job is a lot more attention grabbing than you might suspect. The bike looks as if the only thing that's missing is a machine gun mounted between the forks. Its post-apocalypse, Mad Max styling just begs for armament of some kind, at least a giant pump-powered water cannon.[/quote]

Pic:

[img]http://www.bikez.com/bike/21503/index.jpg[/img]


Mine looks just like this:

[img]http://www.protomatter.com/nate/klr650/images/original.jpg[/img]

:drool:

I took a 250-mile afternoon cruise earlier this week and averaged 50 mpg with plenty WOT and all kinds of road conditions, from wide-open stretches at 100mph to rutted roads and cow pastures at 30mph.. I have a feeling this beauty is going to be taking me places. The only mod I've made so far is removing the windscreen to reduce buffeting, next step is some tank bags and panniers.

CrucialTK 04-27-2005 12:27 PM

No, don't really have my eye on anything yet. I'd like something really cheap, at least a 450. I could fix most of it myself or with the help of friends, so I'm not worried about getting something that won't pass inspection. Only thing I do want is for it not to be struggling around 75 MPH. Anything from there and below will be just fine.

I'm of the mind the more power you have the faster you'll want to go. I'd rather drive a saturn and be content at 80 then an LS1 and be feeling slow at that same speed. Similar feelings with a bike. Don't need a liter bike because I won't be trying to race, I just want to be able to enjoy i.

Squeeky 04-28-2005 12:42 PM

I've always wanted to get a bike, but i've always felt a little overwhelmed breaking into new things. And learning to ride is something that's been a bit intimidating. I think i'll tackle that task this summer though, and get my license and a used bike. Hopefully OWK will have some free time to come down and teach his ol' buddy Squeeky how to keep his new toy upright. ;)

bthorton 05-01-2005 11:17 PM

this may have been asked already, so my apologies if it has.

is shifting gears on a motorcycle just like shifting gears on a car? i dont know how to do either (ive only driven automatics)... but ive been considering learning how to ride a motorcycle over the summer. if i take motorcycle safety program class or whatever- the one that teaches beginners to ride, will they teach you to shift if you have no prior experience?

or should i get one of my friends to take me out in their manual cars and learn to drive manual, and then take the class? any help is appreciated :)

karax 05-02-2005 12:43 AM

[QUOTE=bthorton]this may have been asked already, so my apologies if it has.

is shifting gears on a motorcycle just like shifting gears on a car? i dont know how to do either (ive only driven automatics)... but ive been considering learning how to ride a motorcycle over the summer. if i take motorcycle safety program class or whatever- the one that teaches beginners to ride, will they teach you to shift if you have no prior experience?

or should i get one of my friends to take me out in their manual cars and learn to drive manual, and then take the class? any help is appreciated :)[/QUOTE]


lol, the msf wouldnt be so good if you couldnt get out of neutral :p of course they teach you how to shift there.

oooo I have the msf this weekend. Excited!

VulcaN 05-02-2005 01:45 AM

[QUOTE=bthorton]this may have been asked already, so my apologies if it has.

is shifting gears on a motorcycle just like shifting gears on a car? i dont know how to do either (ive only driven automatics)... but ive been considering learning how to ride a motorcycle over the summer. if i take motorcycle safety program class or whatever- the one that teaches beginners to ride, will they teach you to shift if you have no prior experience?

or should i get one of my friends to take me out in their manual cars and learn to drive manual, and then take the class? any help is appreciated :)[/QUOTE]

In short, no shifting a bike is not like shifting in a car. If you have ever looked at a manual car's shifter you will see that its probably set up in the standard H pattern, it looks kind of like this:
[IMG]http://www.supload.com/012005/shifter111.jpg[/IMG]

You shift by moving that lever into the notches that have the gear numbers on them depending what gear you want to go into.

But on a motorcycle, it uses whats called a sequential gearbox which is completly diffrent. You use a lever located at your foot to shift gears, and all you have to do is press up to shift up a gear and press down on it to shift down a gear, much easier and faster than in a car.

Here is a picture of the lever (black coating on the left is where you press, rough metal peg on the right is where you stand) you move using your foot:
[IMG]http://www.supload.com/012005/02222224.jpg[/IMG]


Assuming your bike has six gears, Its set up like this
6
5
4
3
2
Neutral
1

So if you were in neutral you would click down once to go into first, and then click up to climb the gears as you increase your speed, and visa versa.

Taking the Motorcycle Saftey Foundation's course is a must, you just cant go wrong with it. They will teach you EVERYTHING essential to riding a motorcycle with absoloutly no prior experience on your part other than the fact that you can ride a bicycle without falling over.

Sure have your friend take you out in his manual car, it cant hurt, you can learn how a clutch works and if he lets you drive you can get a feel for how you have to ease out the clutch and give it some gas to keep it from stalling, but most importantly take the MSF course. and good luck

Ignited 05-02-2005 04:54 AM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]
Assuming your bike has six gears, Its set up like this
6
5
4
3
2
Neutral
1
[/QUOTE]
Every time you have to stop at a red light, do you have to return to neutral or can you just go back down to 1st gear? Or does it even matter?

VulcaN 05-02-2005 05:00 AM

You can be in first gear OR neutral, but stick with first gear. If you see a car behind you bearing down on your ass and you have to get out of the way quick, you are not going to want to have to take that time to get the bike in gear when you could just gas it.

Technically you could be in 2nd or another gear but it puts wear and tear on your bikes components to do so and will make for a very slow take off and/or you will just out right stall.

deviant one 05-02-2005 09:46 AM

quick question for you guys:

i'm 5'4", 195 lbs -- would a 250 be too small for me? would i be better off with a 500?

i

bthorton 05-02-2005 12:10 PM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]snip[/QUOTE]

thanks a bunch vulcan; that post was extremely, extremely helpful!

onewheeldoin200 05-02-2005 04:49 PM

[QUOTE=deviant one]quick question for you guys:

i'm 5'4", 195 lbs -- would a 250 be too small for me? would i be better off with a 500?

i[/QUOTE]

Short answer: No.

Longer answer:
The thing is, you're not hugely tall, so the shorter seat height of the 250 would be much better for you when you're learning. The power should be enough to entertain you for your first season of two wheeling :) Insurance on a 250 is almost negligible, too. On the other hand, if you're going to be using the bike as your only vehicle or something, the 500 makes a much more agreeable commuter on the highway.

Either way, take an msf course first. They'll have 250's for you to try out. If it feels too small for you there, then you'd want to move up to the 500 I think.

deviant one 05-02-2005 11:38 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]snip.[/QUOTE]

yea, the bike would prob be my only means of trans, but im thinking MAINLY city streets, and the occasional freeway, and i would much rather master the smaller bike and get to know the proper techs on with something that wouldnt flip out under me.

Detman101 05-04-2005 12:30 PM

deleted.

KNYTE 05-04-2005 04:17 PM

This is the best thread that has ever been posted on Genmay, period.

electric!sheep 05-04-2005 09:59 PM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]You can be in first gear OR neutral, but stick with first gear. If you see a car behind you bearing down on your ass and you have to get out of the way quick, you are not going to want to have to take that time to get the bike in gear when you could just gas it.

Technically you could be in 2nd or another gear but it puts wear and tear on your bikes components to do so and will make for a very slow take off and/or you will just out right stall.[/QUOTE]

BTW, what is the best practice for managing your downshifts when slowing? In my car I usually toss it in neutral and coast, but with a bike it seems like a bad idea. I mean, if you're in 5th and try to knock it back down to neutral, you might lose the clutch by accident and end up sliding down the road with a locked rear wheel as the engine tries to rev up to eleventy million RPMs in second gear.

VulcaN 05-04-2005 10:24 PM

[QUOTE=electric!sheep]BTW, what is the best practice for managing your downshifts when slowing? In my car I usually toss it in neutral and coast, but with a bike it seems like a bad idea. I mean, if you're in 5th and try to knock it back down to neutral, you might lose the clutch by accident and end up sliding down the road with a locked rear wheel as the engine tries to rev up to eleventy million RPMs in second gear.[/QUOTE]

Yeah you can do that but you have to be REALLY firm with your downshifts at least on most bikes, I donít think you could get it into first going at 5th gear speeds (with the clutch in), you can easily grind your gears like that too. I hear it happen all the time with newbie riders, going maybe in 2nd a bit too fast to shift into first they arenít firm on the downshift and you hear the most horrible gear grinding sound ever.

Id usually just engine brake from 5th down to first and stop at the light in first. If you let out the clutch like ur talking about yes you would completely lock up the wheel.

With every bike itís different but you get a feel for engine braking and you will know when to downshift and let out the clutch so you donít lock the wheel up and can engine brake effectively.

Some people make the mistake of just pulling the clutch in and then stopping at the light without downshifting all the way to first, then when they go to take off they of course stall, hehe.

Ignited 05-04-2005 11:33 PM

Ok, I'm going to make another attempt to make sense of this whole downshifting thing. If you're cruising in 5th gear and you're coming up to a red light, do you have to gradually downshift as you come to the light? Or, can you just slow all the way down in 5th gear and then knock it back into first while you're waiting for the light to change?

I know I'll find out all this information when I take the MSF course, but this something I've wondered for years.

VulcaN 05-04-2005 11:37 PM

The proper way is to gradually downshift. Sometimes if you wait till you get to a stop to downshift all the way you will not be able to and may even get stuck in a false neutral. Then you have to rock the bike back and fourth and press down on the shifter to get it to downshift.

So while ur there fiddling with ur bike trying to get it into gear, you will a) still be messing around when the light turns green b) look silly to all your friends - Or worst case not be able to get out of the way in time if an accident should occur or an emergency situation arises

ArpaWocky 05-05-2005 04:46 PM

Dont be like this guy

[url]http://www.gsxr.com/showthread.php?t=3677&page=1&pp=10[/url]

OneWhoKnows 05-05-2005 06:55 PM

[QUOTE=Ignited]Ok, I'm going to make another attempt to make sense of this whole downshifting thing. If you're cruising in 5th gear and you're coming up to a red light, do you have to gradually downshift as you come to the light? Or, can you just slow all the way down in 5th gear and then knock it back into first while you're waiting for the light to change?

I know I'll find out all this information when I take the MSF course, but this something I've wondered for years.[/QUOTE]
I use a combination of engine braking and the front and rear brakes to slow down. Sometimes I use just the front brakes, but that's another story.

As you're slowing down you're doing the following things: Pulling on the front brake lever and pressing down on the rear brake.

As you're slowing down, you pull your clutch and click down a gear while blipping the throttle to rev match and you let the clutch out evenly. Remember the above step takes about half a second. You just repeat this until you're in first gear.

Confusing? I remember when I was like :wtf:

Ignited 05-05-2005 09:50 PM

[QUOTE=OneWhoKnows]As you're slowing down, you pull your clutch and click down a gear while blipping the throttle to rev match and you let the clutch out evenly.[/QUOTE]
Are you talking about working the front brake and the throttle simultaneously?

Ph34rful 05-07-2005 01:49 PM

Since no one seems to have asked...

How much are you guys spending a year on insurance? (What bike, your age, and insurer)

SebTheDJ 05-07-2005 05:55 PM

Kawasaki Ninja ZX6
21
Rider Insurance
$175/year liability

onewheeldoin200 05-08-2005 06:21 PM

[QUOTE=Ignited]Are you talking about working the front brake and the throttle simultaneously?[/QUOTE]

Yes. It takes some getting used to but it's an invaluable skill when you get it. Practice practice practice.

And I never pull up to a light in 5th gear. I always like to be in a gear that will leave me with enough power to scoot off if there's an accident or something behind me.

karax 05-08-2005 07:30 PM

So I just finished the MSF this weekend. It was suuuuch a blast! I didn't really like my bike though (kawasaki eliminator 250) since I kept scraping the foot pegs.

Oh well, can't wait to get a bike now (and then practice more too)

I reccomend the MSF to everyone. I had never touched a bike before, but now I dont feel nearly as overwhelmed.

ReTECH 05-10-2005 09:31 PM

My friend just bought a 2005 Suzuki SV650S. His total riding experience so far is the MSF. :eek: He wanted a Ninja, the zx-6r I think. I talked him out of it. :D We'll be going out riding this weekend, I'm pretty confident he'll stay out of trouble... He's pushing 30, has gotten most of his punkish youth driving habits out of his system, & has a healthy respect for what damage the bike can do to him. He's taking vacation just so he can practice around town.

For the record, I think the SV650 is way up at the upper limit of a 'n00b' bike, and buying new is just asking for trouble. I'll keep the progress posted.

Update : So far so good... he's stalled it quite a few times, so he's erring on the side of too few rpm's instead of too many. Good way to not wreck, until he gets used to it.

nik 05-14-2005 08:27 AM

ok..question which might sound a bit wierd. ive been driving a 300cc scooter around for the past 2 years without any scrapes or accidents. jus one or 2 wierd incidents with people rear ending me and breaking my tail light. ive basically been a real maniac with the bike and now its on its last legs and im thinkin of getting a bike. i have experience with bikes jus that i never had the time to spend more time on them. do i still fit under the inexperienced category? ps ive been riding gearless mopeds since i was 11.

onewheeldoin200 05-14-2005 09:39 AM

[QUOTE=nik]ok..question which might sound a bit wierd. ive been driving a 300cc scooter around for the past 2 years without any scrapes or accidents. jus one or 2 wierd incidents with people rear ending me and breaking my tail light. ive basically been a real maniac with the bike and now its on its last legs and im thinkin of getting a bike. i have experience with bikes jus that i never had the time to spend more time on them. do i still fit under the inexperienced category? ps ive been riding gearless mopeds since i was 11.[/QUOTE]

I'd say you've got enough experience under your belt that, if you took an MSF course on a motorcycle, you could handle an SV650 or [i]maybe[/i] even a 600 supersport depending on your character. I mean....you say you've been "a real maniac" on that scooter. If you do that on a supersport you will be dead. If you can refrain, I think you have the experience on two wheels to stay alive and happy on a nice bike.

Either way, take that MSF course, just to get a hang of the differences between scooters and bikes, if nothing else (and you will inevitably pick up other useful tips and skills as well).

CrAzY DuTcHmAn 05-16-2005 02:59 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]Is there something you can use as a ground anchor? Like one of those U-shaped crash bars around fire hydrants or something? I think that would be most economical. Failing that a disc lock should be okay.[/QUOTE]

Umm, I wouldn't go attatching your bike to a hydrant. Firemen tend to get a bit pissed when they need to use it and your car/bike/tank is in the way. I'm sure you've seen the pic of the car with the hose running through it. You are more likely to just get a ticket, but those aren't fun either.

onewheeldoin200 05-18-2005 07:10 AM

[QUOTE=CrAzY DuTcHmAn]Umm, I wouldn't go attatching your bike to a hydrant. Firemen tend to get a bit pissed when they need to use it and your car/bike/tank is in the way. I'm sure you've seen the pic of the car with the hose running through it. You are more likely to just get a ticket, but those aren't fun either.[/QUOTE]

No no, that's not what I meant. I mean the concrete bars beside the fire hydrant that go into the ground....so that jackasses in cars don't run the hydrant over. Still, you're probably right, they wouldn't even like that because it would get in the way.

CrAzY DuTcHmAn 05-26-2005 08:19 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]No no, that's not what I meant. I mean the concrete bars beside the fire hydrant that go into the ground....so that jackasses in cars don't run the hydrant over. Still, you're probably right, they wouldn't even like that because it would get in the way.[/QUOTE]

Ah, our hydrants dont have those, so I didn't think about that.
You are right though, its still not a great idea to do that.

McKnight 05-27-2005 10:33 PM

I just went ahead and bought a bike this doesnt need its own thread.


i didnt just fuck myself over did I? Im kind of :wtf: about the title. Im not sure if i see rust or not : / Oh, well, for the price I wont make a deal of it.

VulcaN 05-27-2005 10:45 PM

Never buy a bike without a title, thats just asking for trouble. But since you already did Id start trying to contact the DMV in your state and get the ball rolling on getting it registered. I know in my state you would be SOL unless you forged up some documents

electric!sheep 05-27-2005 11:42 PM

Make sure you get a NOTARIZED BILL OF SALE proving that the bike is yours. Then you apply for a duplicate title.

McKnight 05-28-2005 09:22 AM

thanks, i will. :)

nik 06-03-2005 11:34 AM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]I'd say you've got enough experience under your belt that, if you took an MSF course on a motorcycle, you could handle an SV650 or [i]maybe[/i] even a 600 supersport depending on your character. I mean....you say you've been "a real maniac" on that scooter. If you do that on a supersport you will be dead. If you can refrain, I think you have the experience on two wheels to stay alive and happy on a nice bike.

Either way, take that MSF course, just to get a hang of the differences between scooters and bikes, if nothing else (and you will inevitably pick up other useful tips and skills as well).[/QUOTE]

im not in the US.. im in the middle east. most of my driving was on roads with traffic and stuff. the thing is... im not ovrly familiar with the gears and im scared of getting a good bike only to cause major damage to it by shifting improperly or getting distracted while tryint to figure out the gears and slamming into something. are there bikes with shift indicators? or is it possible to fit them into a bike?

edit: by shift indicators i mean an indication which gear it is in...

onewheeldoin200 06-03-2005 04:29 PM

[QUOTE=nik]im not in the US.. im in the middle east. most of my driving was on roads with traffic and stuff. the thing is... im not ovrly familiar with the gears and im scared of getting a good bike only to cause major damage to it by shifting improperly or getting distracted while tryint to figure out the gears and slamming into something. are there bikes with shift indicators? or is it possible to fit them into a bike?

edit: by shift indicators i mean an indication which gear it is in...[/QUOTE]

oooooooo okay. Don't worry about shifting gears on the bike...to me it's much easier than doing it in a car.

The only shift indicators I know of are made by a company called Data Tool in the UK. There are probably others, but they seem to be the most popular. Most bikes don't have shift indicators, but do have a green light telling you when it's in neutral.

lopoetve 06-06-2005 10:18 AM

Question: what are your opinions on the Honda CB250 and CB750 Nighthawk? I'm too big for the 250 rebel, so I've been told to consider the 750 Nighthawk for a first bike.

dudemac 06-07-2005 01:04 AM

I've been wanting a bike ever since i was a kid, and i hope to have enough cash to get one by next spring. I'm usually a pretty cautious guy, and i take calculated risks, so i wouldnt be going nuts on a fast bike. I would like to have a good amount of power for the freeway though.

What i want is a sport bike...i know not to start out huge on a bike like some people i know have (900cc etc). Is 500-600cc too big to start out on? any bike suggestions?

Thanks.

onewheeldoin200 06-07-2005 05:40 AM

[QUOTE=lopoetve]Question: what are your opinions on the Honda CB250 and CB750 Nighthawk? I'm too big for the 250 rebel, so I've been told to consider the 750 Nighthawk for a first bike.[/QUOTE]
Yeah, generally a cruiser of less than 800cc or so is quite useable for a beginner. They aren't as peppy and generally insane as sport bikes are compared to their displacement. The Nighthawk is a cool bike....I say go for it :cool:

[QUOTE=dudemac]I've been wanting a bike ever since i was a kid, and i hope to have enough cash to get one by next spring. I'm usually a pretty cautious guy, and i take calculated risks, so i wouldnt be going nuts on a fast bike. I would like to have a good amount of power for the freeway though.

What i want is a sport bike...i know not to start out huge on a bike like some people i know have (900cc etc). Is 500-600cc too big to start out on? any bike suggestions?

Thanks.[/QUOTE]
Have a look above at the EX500 and the SV650....I think those are the kind of bikes you should be considering. If those don't suit your fancy there's a few suggestions by TheFleshRocket that you might consider.

VulcaN 06-07-2005 02:01 PM

We need a graduated licensing system like in european countries and australia... where your permit only lets you ride lower CC bikes and then you get to work your way up. Practically everyone rides over there and it seems to be working out a lot better than in the USA.

onewheeldoin200 06-08-2005 09:57 PM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]We need a graduated licensing system like in european countries and australia... where your permit only lets you ride lower CC bikes and then you get to work your way up. Practically everyone rides over there and it seems to be working out a lot better than in the USA.[/QUOTE]

Yup. The death rate of motorcyclists in the US is nearly 5 times that of UK riders. Ridiculous.

Veeb0rg 06-10-2005 02:39 AM

I've been seriously considering learning to ride a bike, I have a problem thou.. I'm 6'2 and 350ish.

I don't want a crotch rocket, but i don't want a full out harley like cruiser.

any reccomendations? *yes, i've started a diet/work out routine, but still*

Little info for ya.

I'm 26. I act 45, mostly
Less then a year ago I lost a friend to a 900rr and a tree.
I'm dead serious about being straight on a bike, no monkey business for me.
I plan on taking the safety courses, and my buddy rides and is willing to teach *he has a mid 80's ninja *i think, its black and the stickers are gone*

electric!sheep 06-10-2005 09:41 PM

[QUOTE=Veeb0rg]I've been seriously considering learning to ride a bike, I have a problem thou.. I'm 6'2 and 350ish.

I don't want a crotch rocket, but i don't want a full out harley like cruiser.

any reccomendations? *yes, i've started a diet/work out routine, but still*

Little info for ya.

I'm 26. I act 45, mostly
Less then a year ago I lost a friend to a 900rr and a tree.
I'm dead serious about being straight on a bike, no monkey business for me.
I plan on taking the safety courses, and my buddy rides and is willing to teach *he has a mid 80's ninja *i think, its black and the stickers are gone*[/QUOTE]

This may be the bike fanboy in me speaking, or maybe Kawaski managed to make a god among bikes, but...how about a KLR650? It has gobs of torque, a very simple one-cylinder "thumper" engine, a top speed of ~100mph, a perfectly upright stance, and a solid look.

Imagine what a car would be like if it had the styling of a Humvee; the suspension, clearance, and performance of a Jeep; the gas mileage of a Prius; the maintainability and community support of a 350 small block; and a Saturn's purported resistance to dents. That is the KLR in motorcycle form.

On that note, as a single-cylinder vehicle owner, I laugh at Prius owners. They are unenlightened. Everyone (particularly those concerned about the environment) should own a motorcycle for fair day travel, and a normal car (covered wagon) for errands and rainy days.

Why it is hardcore:

[url="http://www.amadirectlink.com/features/Cichon.asp"]http://www.amadirectlink.com/features/Cichon.asp[/url]

[url="http://www.peace65.freeserve.co.uk/Pictures/militaryproduction.htm"]http://www.peace65.freeserve.co.uk/Pictures/militaryproduction.htm[/url]

[img]http://www.peace65.freeserve.co.uk/Pictures/m1030m1jp8.jpg[/img]

[img]http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/photos/2005models/2005-Kawasaki-KLR650b.jpg[/img]

McKnight 06-12-2005 04:28 PM

I finally got it.
Im 5'7 though, and I can only put one foot down firmly to hold it up. I can have 2 feet down but my heel is about an inch above ground. Should I cut a tiny bit out of the bike or leave it? Im stil growing as far as im concerned so I dont know :- / overall suggestions?

deviant one 06-12-2005 05:25 PM

how much should i look to spend on buying a beginner bike + gear + licencing + all other misc fees and dues and taxes...

electric!sheep 06-13-2005 06:36 PM

:lol: That's a total rat bike man, looks pretty cool though. How much, how many miles, and excuse my ignorance, but what the hell is it?

electric!sheep 06-13-2005 06:39 PM

[QUOTE=deviant one]how much should i look to spend on buying a beginner bike + gear + licencing + all other misc fees and dues and taxes...[/QUOTE]

$2,000 min for a decent beginner bike, $350-500 for gear, $150 for insurance, a few hundred for parts/tools/tires, and a percentage of whatever you claim the bike's value to be for taxes (I told the DMV my bike is worth 1K ;)). So, be prepared to spend $3,000, give or take a few hundred bucks.

VulcaN 06-13-2005 07:41 PM

$350-500 for gear!? most people i know say $500-1000. Good gear will last you a long time even through more than one low speed spill. Id spend more money on gear than my bike anyday, as the bike can be replaced :)

figure at least $200 for decent helmet
$150-200 for a jacket
$100 - $150 for pants
$100-150 for boots
$50-80 for gloves

thats $600 min right there, sure you could buy used gear (newenough.com) or something to save money but im just talking about new stuff here

electric!sheep 06-13-2005 07:49 PM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]$350-500 for gear!? most people i know say $500-1000. Good gear will last you a long time even through more than one low speed spill. Id spend more money on gear than my bike anyday, as the bike can be replaced :)

figure at least $200 for decent helmet
$150-200 for a jacket
$100 - $150 for pants
$100-150 for boots
$50-80 for gloves

thats $600 min right there, sure you could buy used gear (newenough.com) or something to save money but im just talking about new stuff here[/QUOTE]

I have a new matching set of Alpinestars pants and jacket and they work just fine. The main problem they have is quality control (I had to mend a seam or two). My HJC helmet cost about $120. And since I bought all my stuff at one store, they gave me a 10% discount when I inquired. My boots are Altama jungle combat boots--they cost about $100 and look normal enough that I wear them at work. I could scrape soles against asphalt at 60mph and the Vibram wouldn't have a mark. :)

Oh, and must gloat, I did my first boot-scraping turn today (my foot was sticking out a bit off the pegs). Sparks next time!

McKnight 06-13-2005 08:43 PM

[QUOTE=electric!sheep]:lol: That's a total rat bike man, looks pretty cool though. How much, how many miles, and excuse my ignorance, but what the hell is it?[/QUOTE]

oh yea forgot to add, its an 89' zx6r:lol: durr me. yea it is a rat bike, but it sounds great and it fits what I was looking for.

~20k miles
$1500

I want to take some of the black paint off of the fork before anything. What would be the best method for that?

edit: [url]http://img59.echo.cx/img59/9918/bikeheadlights1lm.jpg[/url] since the seat and exhaust isnt an eye sore anymore, this is what makes me cringe now.

electric!sheep 06-13-2005 09:38 PM

[QUOTE=McKnight]oh yea forgot to add, its an 89' zx6r:lol: durr me. yea it is a rat bike, but it sounds great and it fits what I was looking for.

~20k miles
$1500

I want to take some of the black paint off of the fork before anything. What would be the best method for that?

edit: [url="http://img59.echo.cx/img59/9918/bikeheadlights1lm.jpg"]http://img59.echo.cx/img59/9918/bikeheadlights1lm.jpg[/url] since the seat and exhaust isnt an eye sore anymore, this is what makes me cringe now.[/QUOTE]

Carb cleaner will dissolve pretty much everything non-metallic. Not bad mileage for the price. Make sure you replace the chain and check the sprockets for hooking or other wear. I'd also consider pulling the carbs and cleaning them out. Change oil and filter so you start your own maintenance history, etc.

karax 06-13-2005 10:58 PM

[QUOTE=electric!sheep]$2,000 min for a decent beginner bike, $350-500 for gear, $150 for insurance, a few hundred for parts/tools/tires, and a percentage of whatever you claim the bike's value to be for taxes (I told the DMV my bike is worth 1K ;)). So, be prepared to spend $3,000, give or take a few hundred bucks.[/QUOTE]


i got my 96 gs500 for $1600, so id say you can get a good bike for under 2000 if you are patient and good at bargaining.

but 3000 is still a good estimate.

electric!sheep 06-14-2005 10:50 PM

[QUOTE=karax]i got my 96 gs500 for $1600, so id say you can get a good bike for under 2000 if you are patient and good at bargaining.

but 3000 is still a good estimate.[/QUOTE]

Personally, I'd try to get a bike under 10K miles for a first ride, or one that his been maintained very well. You don't want to be stuck wondering WTF is wrong before you've had a chance to discover everything there is to know about it.

Delirum 06-16-2005 03:12 PM

I got a CBR 600
2000
As my first bike.
Im a rebel.

VulcaN 06-16-2005 05:56 PM

[QUOTE=Delirum]I got a CBR 600
2000
As my first bike.
Im a rebel.[/QUOTE]

Thats the kind of hapless ignorant attitude that people get killed over, I hope you are just joking and take riding very seriously.

Delirum 06-17-2005 02:29 PM

I take it serious.
Its my first bike.
I can handle it just fine

onewheeldoin200 06-17-2005 06:12 PM

[QUOTE=Delirum]I take it serious.
Its my first bike.
I can handle it just fine[/QUOTE]

That's what they all say.....hopefully you'll be lucky.

Ride safe.

ut4ever 06-23-2005 06:17 AM

I have a question about prices...

I'm thinking about buying a bike at or near the end of the year, since I will have some play money to spend. When is the best time to buy a bike? Are there certain times like at the end of summer/begining of winter where the prices tend to be lower?

onewheeldoin200 06-23-2005 07:31 PM

[QUOTE=ut4ever]I have a question about prices...

I'm thinking about buying a bike at or near the end of the year, since I will have some play money to spend. When is the best time to buy a bike? Are there certain times like at the end of summer/begining of winter where the prices tend to be lower?[/QUOTE]

Generally anytime between the fall and when the new models hit the showroom. The dealerships are trying to clear out for the new models and people want to sell their own rides before it'll have to sit around in their garage and depreciate.

ut4ever 06-23-2005 09:35 PM

[QUOTE=onewheeldoin200]Generally anytime between the fall and when the new models hit the showroom. The dealerships are trying to clear out for the new models and people want to sell their own rides before it'll have to sit around in their garage and depreciate.[/QUOTE]


Yeah thats what I figured. If I'd get one, it would be one thats less then $2500, and I wouldn't have a place to store it really other then paying for storage. Probably would be cheaper to by it in the fall and pay for storage then to buy it in the spring when everyone else is buying.

Skadebo 06-27-2005 05:22 PM

So which of these bikes would be recommended for my 190-200lb ass?

Toast 06-30-2005 09:08 AM

I've got a question...

I read the sticky, and have done some research and asked a ALOT of people what they think is a good beginner bike. I am 5'8 annd about 170lbs. My friend has a F2 CBR600 (96) with about 25k on it. The fairings are cracked and scratched, the the rear one is gone completely. It has new tires, and he wants ~$2k for it. Is this a suitable bike for my first, and a good deal?

Delirum 07-03-2005 12:57 AM

I have a cbr600 (2000)

Its my first bike, I have been riding for about 4 months now. I want to try doing a wheelie (on a closed parking lot or somthing. I'm comfertable with my bike and everything, and I just want to try doing like a 'baby' wheelie or somthing to try and get the feel for it. So if someone could give some detailed instructions on how to go about doing this let me know.


Also, I'm not one of those idiot stunters. I wear full gear at all times, and I'm not going to be doing 100mph wheelies on the highway, I just want to learn somthing new and fun :)

McKnight 07-03-2005 08:12 AM

Oh yea you definitely take this seriously:rolleyes: If you really want to know, join a motorcycle forum and ask there. No one approves of answering that question in a beginner bike thread.

Wheelies are evil.... I would never do such things Allnighte

ArpaWocky 07-03-2005 06:11 PM

[QUOTE=Delirum]I have a cbr600 (2000)

Its my first bike, I have been riding for about 4 months now. I want to try doing a wheelie (on a closed parking lot or somthing. I'm comfertable with my bike and everything, and I just want to try doing like a 'baby' wheelie or somthing to try and get the feel for it. So if someone could give some detailed instructions on how to go about doing this let me know.
[/QUOTE]
I'm in the same situation as you, 01 F4i, riding since ~february, just started trying to ride out wheelies. check out [url]www.cycleforums.com[/url] , go into the sportbikes section and then theres a stunt section, some good wheelie faqs in there.

edit : good one ->> [url]http://www.stuntlife.com/forums/showthread.php?t=72156[/url]

Stajerker 07-07-2005 05:34 PM

Ok guys...I now have my M1 and am o my way to getting my M2...i've decided not to get a bike till next summer thought. However, I was looking at insurance getting quotes and the like, and a ninja 250 i found I could get for ~1400 a year, and then the suzuki GS500 is next up at ~2000 a year. I'd really love to pay the lower insurance for a 250, however I dunno if i'd be abled to be on one. Would i even be able to get moving? Im 6'3 and ~210 lbs...i just wonder if I could go 100km/h on the highway, and if i'd be abled to get out of my own way.

Would a 250 work for me? Im really buying a bike to save money on gas and insurance from a car (dont need transport during winter @ uni) so I dont want the most powerful bike ever, but i'd liek something that moves at least as fast as what I currnetly drive, a 99 Subaru Outback (~7.5-8.5s 0-60)

electric!sheep 07-07-2005 05:51 PM

Get a used bike and go liability-only. I have insurance through McGraw/PSIC on my KLR650 (excellent choice for someone of your stature) and it's about $140 USD a year. :D

electric!sheep 07-07-2005 05:53 PM

[QUOTE=Phire]I've got a question...

I read the sticky, and have done some research and asked a ALOT of people what they think is a good beginner bike. I am 5'8 annd about 170lbs. My friend has a F2 CBR600 (96) with about 25k on it. The fairings are cracked and scratched, the the rear one is gone completely. It has new tires, and he wants ~$2k for it. Is this a suitable bike for my first, and a good deal?[/QUOTE]

What kind of maintenance has he done on it? Chain, sprockets, regular repairs, etc.?

IceMan713 07-07-2005 06:23 PM

while the thread was very helpful in deciding what bike to get, can anyone right a quick list of the process to follow in getting absolute start to finish

ie:
decide to get a bike
...next?

go to an msf place and sign up for the course? take the course? then buy bike, then enjoy?

edit: also, most likely it's going to be a 250 ninja or the like, currently i'm 150lbs, but i plan to be 170-180(bulking) in the near future, does the 20-30lbs really make that big of a difference?

VulcaN 07-07-2005 06:54 PM

you notice a difference when you shave 10 lbs off your exhaust, so yeah id imagine gaining 30 lbs of weight would really slow you down

IceMan713 07-07-2005 07:05 PM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]you notice a difference when you shave 10 lbs off your exhaust, so yeah id imagine gaining 30 lbs of weight would really slow you down[/QUOTE]
in your opinion would it be more practical to get the 500 then?


[url]http://miami.craigslist.org/mcy/80555931.html[/url]

[url]http://miami.craigslist.org/mcy/80590162.html[/url]

i just found these 2 around me, considering i've never ridden before, is a 500 still tame enough for me to learn on

edit: or that [url]http://miami.craigslist.org/mcy/80552258.html[/url] :D

VulcaN 07-08-2005 01:00 AM

yeah you can easily learn on a 500, its just a matter of how much cash you have to throw around. The 250 will be fine if you are trying to save on cash (its not like ur 200lbs+ here). That way you have more money for gear, and / or a new bike later down the line.

But if you have the money sure why not get the 500 if you like it more. Go check them out in person and see what you think the better deal is.

IceMan713 07-08-2005 01:03 AM

[QUOTE=VulcaN]yeah you can easily learn on a 500, its just a matter of how much cash you have to throw around. The 250 will be fine if you are trying to save on cash (its not like ur 200lbs+ here). That way you have more money for gear, and / or a new bike later down the line.

But if you have the money sure why not get the 500 if you like it more. Go check them out in person and see what you think the better deal is.[/QUOTE]
meh, i have like $7k cash so 1400 vs 1500 doesn't really matter.

i really want a gs500f but i don't want to buy a new bike for my first :P

right now i'm leaning towards the 500, but i'm curious, from an objective point of view, will the 250 still be fun, and practical? or will it [i]really[/i] get boring after a week even under reasonable circumstances?

McKnight 07-08-2005 09:56 AM

the 250 will definitly be fun. It can take twisties far easier. you would be much faster going through very tight turns constantly than you would with the same track on a 500.


And if you have 7k to spend on a future bike after selling the 250 its very worth it IMO. Yes a 250 would get old quick, but thats why ebay, cycletrader, and craigslist is there for you. So you could sell it for the same price and get a 600. If you dont plan on getting a 600 after having the 250 for a couple months then I would say its a waste and get the 500. Dont worry about the weight of the bike if you are underweight unless you are too short or too big and tall. These guys really press it on you to get the 250 for some reason. if you go to a cycle forum you will see plenty of people starting on 600's... and here the first post makes an sv650 sound like a death trap lol. Then again this isnt a cycle forum and thats how the faq should make it sound on a forum like this.

IceMan713 07-08-2005 11:18 AM

[QUOTE=McKnight]the 250 will definitly be fun. It can take twisties far easier. you would be much faster going through very tight turns constantly than you would with the same track on a 500.


And if you have 7k to spend on a future bike after selling the 250 its very worth it IMO. Yes a 250 would get old quick, but thats why ebay, cycletrader, and craigslist is there for you. So you could sell it for the same price and get a 600. If you dont plan on getting a 600 after having the 250 for a couple months then I would say its a waste and get the 500. Dont worry about the weight of the bike if you are underweight unless you are too short or too big and tall. These guys really press it on you to get the 250 for some reason. if you go to a cycle forum you will see plenty of people starting on 600's... and here the first post makes an sv650 sound like a death trap lol. Then again this isnt a cycle forum and thats how the faq should make it sound on a forum like this.[/QUOTE]
makes sense, I completely forgot about the resalve value of the bikes, and that they barely depreciate at all.

by the end of summer I'll have like ~11k, so hmmm, it might be smarter to get a 250 now and then get a 600 or the sv650 or the like.

hmm...

electric!sheep 07-09-2005 08:48 PM

If I had started on a sport/street bike, I would have definitely gone with the SV650 or similar, instead of a 250. But I got a KLR650, figuring that even if I get some crazy liter-bike later on, I can keep the KLR for pure off-road, or just putting around to and from work. (Can't beat 50 mpg!)

nameless? 07-11-2005 05:16 PM

I am thinking about getting a bike but i am 6,4 195 and really would rather have something like the sv650 or KLR650 as a first bike because I don't think i would fit on 250. Are these good choices?

McKnight 07-11-2005 05:40 PM

If you read rider reviews on the v twin, and like it sure. Im sure electric sheep will adopt you on the subject since you mentioned the klr650 :p

electric!sheep 07-12-2005 09:05 PM

[QUOTE=nameless?]I am thinking about getting a bike but i am 6,4 195 and really would rather have something like the sv650 or KLR650 as a first bike because I don't think i would fit on 250. Are these good choices?[/QUOTE]

The SV650 is to the KLR650 as a 5-Series BMW is to a Hummer. They're both pretty big, but the KLR is in a class of its own. It's probably the tallest bike you'll ever see on the road; people under 6' need not apply.

Choosing between options boils down to this: How do you plan to use your bike? What do you want out of it? The KLR650 was the perfect bike for me, but I can see other people getting extremely frustrated with the things that I love about it.


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