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Enayla
<3 *muah* - Regime|Life
 
yumm the bacon looks so good and fattening hahaha!
Old 04-05-2009, 02:50 PM Enayla is offline  
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coalesce
 
these threads kill me cuz i'm not motivated enough to even try the easiest of the recipes i see on here.
Old 04-06-2009, 01:30 AM coalesce is offline  
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Mercurien
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by diearzte2 View Post
Not to be pretentious, but gross.

Try making your own sauce, its really easy. Brown onions, garlic, beef or sausage, add thyme (optionally other italian spices, red pepper ect.) then add 2 cans of whole, peeled tomatoes that you have crushed by hand. Bring to a simmer and add salt to help break down the tomatoes, then let simmer for a half hour. Tastes infinitely better than Ragu and is usually cheaper provided you have thyme already.

Well now you've made the mistake of showing a glimmer of knowledge/bragging. You really should post your pasta sauce recipe with a little more detail. I'm assuming that a lot of it is to taste, but approximate recipe proportions would be greatly appreciated among the culinarily retarded among us.

I'm guessing a whole onion, 6ish cloves of garlic to taste, 1 lb of beef, and some amount of time? What is a can of tomatoes? I've seen them between 1 cup and 1 gallon. I don't know what a can is.

Also, what crushes a can of whole tomatoes? I have a potato masher. Does that work, or do you have to knife them too? It seems like a potato masher would just squish them without giving the nice consistency that I'm used to with my Classico.
Old 04-06-2009, 01:39 AM Mercurien is offline  
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diearzte2
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercurien View Post
Well now you've made the mistake of showing a glimmer of knowledge/bragging. You really should post your pasta sauce recipe with a little more detail. I'm assuming that a lot of it is to taste, but approximate recipe proportions would be greatly appreciated among the culinarily retarded among us.

I'm guessing a whole onion, 6ish cloves of garlic to taste, 1 lb of beef, and some amount of time? What is a can of tomatoes? I've seen them between 1 cup and 1 gallon. I don't know what a can is.

Also, what crushes a can of whole tomatoes? I have a potato masher. Does that work, or do you have to knife them too? It seems like a potato masher would just squish them without giving the nice consistency that I'm used to with my Classico.

It's not my recipe, its Mario Batali's. Here is a link:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci..._22502,00.html

He uses carrots also, which I tend to omit because I rarely have carrots on hand. The sauce is really easy to make since usually I will have most of the ingredients on hand at any given time (though I am probably one of the few early 20 guys that randomly buys canned whole tomatoes on a routine basis).

Cooking really isn't an exact science, you can crush the tomatoes by hand, which I usually do. I just dump them into a largish mixing bowl and crush them slowly as to reduce splashing. If you like a very smooth consistency, which I don't, you can blend the sauce after cooking it ala Ceejamon in his "super-simple tomato sauce" recipe here:

http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?p=19156205

Also, if you add the salt earlier in the simmering process it serves to help break down the tomatoes. A can of tomatoes in a home cooking context is generally considered a 28 oz can, the standard "large" size in your grocery store.

I usually make this recipe and freeze half of it right away. If you make it without the meat, it freezes exceptionally well and you can just brown some meat up when you want to make it and it tastes as fresh as the day you made it. This recipe is a great recipe to learn on, because it is simple, tastes much much cleaner/fresher than anything canned, and emphasizes a lot of basic cooking skills. Even chopping, proper heat control, timing, and most importantly, salt control. With too little salt, this tastes like warm, stewed tomatoes, but with just the right amount of salt, it really tastes bright and fresh.

Your first sentence made me not want to reply to you btw. This isn't main forum.
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Old 04-06-2009, 01:22 PM diearzte2 is offline  
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#19  

Mercurien
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by diearzte2 View Post
It's not my recipe, its Mario Batali's. Here is a link:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci..._22502,00.html

He uses carrots also, which I tend to omit because I rarely have carrots on hand. The sauce is really easy to make since usually I will have most of the ingredients on hand at any given time (though I am probably one of the few early 20 guys that randomly buys canned whole tomatoes on a routine basis).

Cooking really isn't an exact science, you can crush the tomatoes by hand, which I usually do. I just dump them into a largish mixing bowl and crush them slowly as to reduce splashing. If you like a very smooth consistency, which I don't, you can blend the sauce after cooking it ala Ceejamon in his "super-simple tomato sauce" recipe here:

http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?p=19156205

Also, if you add the salt earlier in the simmering process it serves to help break down the tomatoes. A can of tomatoes in a home cooking context is generally considered a 28 oz can, the standard "large" size in your grocery store.

I usually make this recipe and freeze half of it right away. If you make it without the meat, it freezes exceptionally well and you can just brown some meat up when you want to make it and it tastes as fresh as the day you made it. This recipe is a great recipe to learn on, because it is simple, tastes much much cleaner/fresher than anything canned, and emphasizes a lot of basic cooking skills. Even chopping, proper heat control, timing, and most importantly, salt control. With too little salt, this tastes like warm, stewed tomatoes, but with just the right amount of salt, it really tastes bright and fresh.

Your first sentence made me not want to reply to you btw. This isn't main forum.

Good stuff, thanks for the info. I've got some stuff to try this weekend. I'll stop hijacking the OP's thread now.
Old 04-07-2009, 04:07 AM Mercurien is offline  
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