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ShoelessOne
 
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I have the Shun Ken Onion Chef's Knife - I'm wondering about using a honing steel

In particular, I'm wondering if

1) I need to buy the 40" shun honing steel and

2) If I should be using a honing steel at all.

I understand the basic principle here: sharpening actually removes material from the blade, a honing stone should basically just put an edge on what's there, sort of like pushing sand back into a castle.

The reason I hesitate is that I've used honing steels in the past with other knifes, and I notice that often times honing seems to result in something like "micro serrations", or basically a jagged looking edge.

The thing is, I'm not rich. I got this knife as a present from my GF, and I'd like to take the best care of the 200$ knife as possible. At the same time, in my experience honing DOES make a big difference. It gives you a better edge back.

I've heard that you should actually hone your knife every use (or close to that).

Anyway, a jumble of thoughts. I'd be interested in hearing you opinions.

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Old 03-24-2010, 12:56 PM ShoelessOne is offline  
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tryfuhl
 
You should probably learn how to properly use the steel. Most blades will have what you call "micro serrations" if you inspect them closely. Not the kind you find on that stamped Henckel shit but you know what I mean. The steel merely aligns the edges.

For most knives you'll start at around a 20 degree outward angle at the top of the blade and do an arcing motion from the heel to the tip. It may help to do this at first with the end of the steel pressed down firmly against a counter/cutting board, etc. Don't press hard, just a light to medium resistance will be good. Do about 5 passes on each side every time that you do any significant cutting. Have them professionally sharpened every year or three, depending on frequency/nature of use.

I would recommend using the matching steel because the material and build for the matching steels are meant to be used on the blade type/material on the knife.

As far as I know Shun does not make a 40" steel, but perhaps you meant $40. They also have the dual sided stone if you prefer that.
Old 03-25-2010, 02:21 PM tryfuhl is offline  
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kooshball
 
they have specific instructions from each company.

http://www.kershawknives.com/faq.php?brand=shun
Old 03-25-2010, 02:55 PM kooshball is offline  
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cokezeroholic
 
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Look at the edge the knife has from the factory and keep it at the same angle when using the steel on it. That is unless you have a knife made of a softer metal and can manipulate the edge to your desired sharpness.
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Old 03-25-2010, 07:35 PM cokezeroholic is offline  
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Butthole Eliminator
 
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40"?!?
just use the unglazed bottom rim of your ceramic plate.
Old 03-26-2010, 08:52 AM Butthole Eliminator is offline  
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Retardedchicken
 
This is slightly off topic, but I have a Shun Ken Onion hollow ground 7.5" santoku and it is the sharpest and most comfortable-to-hold knife i have ever used

A tad pricey, but well worth it!

Ok back on topic, when I bought the knife from Williams-Sonoma the lady said they have a sharpener specifically for Shun knives, and it is on Williams-Sonoma's website.

EDIT:

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/produ...rage|cutsshman

theres the sharpener

Last edited by Retardedchicken; 03-26-2010 at 10:47 AM..
Old 03-26-2010, 10:05 AM Retardedchicken is offline  
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Zangmonkey
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use the honing steel regularly if you're confident with it

Alton brown has a nice guide video
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Old 03-26-2010, 10:00 PM Zangmonkey is offline  
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cokezeroholic
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retardedchicken View Post
This is slightly off topic, but I have a Shun Ken Onion hollow ground 7.5" santoku and it is the sharpest and most comfortable-to-hold knife i have ever used

A tad pricey, but well worth it!

Ok back on topic, when I bought the knife from Williams-Sonoma the lady said they have a sharpener specifically for Shun knives, and it is on Williams-Sonoma's website.

EDIT:

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/produ...rage|cutsshman

theres the sharpener
Ugh, I'd never trust a machine to do the sharpening for me. That is more likely to damage the knife than you are if you do it manually, and faster too!
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Old 04-01-2010, 11:41 PM cokezeroholic is offline  
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tmoney1876
 
That and a sharpening machine does not do the same thing as a honing steel.

A honing steel is only supposed to straighten and align the edge (it gets folded over with use) it isn't supposed to remove material.

A sharpening stone or machine does remove material. This should only be necessary every 6 months or so.
Old 04-02-2010, 09:07 PM tmoney1876 is offline  
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