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Whitebread
 
Curvedvomit, I realize this virus has the potential to cause a massive pandemic, but don't you think your fear mogoring somewhat? Following th enews and keeping up with the progression of this disease is important, but I don't think you need to spend so much time on it. We can't do anything ourselves except encourage our health officials and researchers to create medicines and proper public responce plans. No need to be so caught up in it.
Old 02-05-2007, 01:58 PM Whitebread is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitebread View Post
Curvedvomit, I realize this virus has the potential to cause a massive pandemic, but don't you think your fear mogoring somewhat? Following th enews and keeping up with the progression of this disease is important, but I don't think you need to spend so much time on it. We can't do anything ourselves except encourage our health officials and researchers to create medicines and proper public responce plans. No need to be so caught up in it.


Its not feasrmongering.
I am disabled so I am st home 24/7

i have time to track the progress and document it here.

Thanks for your concern though
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Old 02-05-2007, 08:46 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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Whitebread
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by curdledvomit View Post
Its not feasrmongering.
I am disabled so I am st home 24/7

i have time to track the progress and document it here.

Thanks for your concern though

O, I'm sorry about that.
Old 02-05-2007, 10:35 PM Whitebread is offline  
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Badger_sly
 
I appreciate your service to updating us about the H5N1 virus. The info you post helps keep me up to date with conversations I have with my girlfriend, who is a research scientist working with the virus.
Old 02-06-2007, 08:46 AM Badger_sly is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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Originally Posted by Whitebread View Post
O, I'm sorry about that.

no worries

this from...http://www.breitbart.com/news/2007/02/06/D8N4D7800.html

British Bird Flu Worker Is Hospitalized

LONDON (AP) -- A worker who attended the bird flu outbreak in eastern England is being monitored in hospital, British news outlets reported Tuesday. Sky News and the British Broadcasting Corp. quoted the Health Protection Agency as saying the worker, who was not identified, was undergoing tests.
The agency could not immediately be reached for comment.
All 159,000 turkeys at a vast commercial farm in Holton, about 130 miles northeast of London, were slaughtered after 2,500 birds died of the H5N1 strain of the virus last week.
Many countries moved to ban British poultry imports in the wake of he outbreak, the first on a British farm.


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Old 02-06-2007, 12:39 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badger_sly View Post
I appreciate your service to updating us about the H5N1 virus. The info you post helps keep me up to date with conversations I have with my girlfriend, who is a research scientist working with the virus.

thanks
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00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 02-06-2007, 12:39 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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TheMorlock
Contrary to my previous title I never fucked Inf's mother
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitebread View Post
Curvedvomit, I realize this virus has the potential to cause a massive pandemic, but don't you think your fear mogoring somewhat? Following th enews and keeping up with the progression of this disease is important, but I don't think you need to spend so much time on it. We can't do anything ourselves except encourage our health officials and researchers to create medicines and proper public responce plans. No need to be so caught up in it.

what dont you understand?
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Old 02-07-2007, 12:38 AM TheMorlock is offline  
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Whitebread
 
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what dont you understand?

What? I was questioning his frequent posting of bird flu articles.
Old 02-07-2007, 12:58 PM Whitebread is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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this from...http://www.themoneytimes.com/article...id-102860.html


UK's food watchdog examines meat for H5N1 virus

by Poonam Wadhwani - February 10, 2007 - 0 comments
UK's food watchdog examines meat for H5N1 virus

Britain’s food watchdog, The Food Standards Agency (FSA), on Friday said that it had started a probe to establish whether the avian influenza recently discovered at a Suffolk turkey farm has spread into the food chain.

After getting alarmed with preliminary scientific tests that showed the strain of avian flu in British poultry farm that led to the culling of 2,600 turkeys at the Suffolk farm and recent two serious outbreaks in Hungary may well be identical, the FSA decided to check that no infected meat has got into human food.

Bernard Matthews, Europe's largest turkey producer where last week almost 160,000 turkeys were culled after the discovery of the H5N1 virus, has acknowledged shipping 38 tonnes of partially processed turkey meat from Hungary per week.

Despite the fact that the deadly H5N1 virus does not pose a food safety risk, the food agency said it will still check whether meat contaminated with bird flu had reached shops as it is illegal for infected meat to be in our food, and warned it would take any suitable action if it were found to be there.

"I couldn't tell you what we would do. But we wouldn't want that meat there. At the moment we are not in the process of withdrawing any turkey products from supermarket shelves," a Food Standards Agency spokeswoman said. "If infected meat had got into the food chain it wouldn't be a safety risk to consumers."

Meanwhile, the government's chief scientist Professor Sir David King warned turkey products may have to be recalled because it has been established that Bernard Matthews had been transporting turkey meat from Hungary to the Suffolk farm where the H5N1 strain of the virus was discovered.

Ben Bradshaw, the environment minister warned that legal action could be launched at the plant, following the latest developments and possible bio-security breaches.

Though Bernard Matthews firm denied breaching rules on imports of meat but it has now temporarily stopped Hungarian imports and exports as a precaution while Hungarian and UK government vets carry out their investigations.

The Health Protection Agency announced that at least 400 workers at Bernard Matthews, the firm at the centre of the UK outbreak, were identified as having been in close contact with contaminated turkeys. All have been offered the seasonal flu vaccine and 200 of them had already come forward, the agency said.

FSA has decided to include arrangements at the farm's adjacent plant for food processing as part of its investigation.

The H5N1 virus has entrapped the Middle East, Africa and Europe since it re-emerged in Asia in 2003 and although it remains largely an animal disease, it can be fatal for those people who come into close contact with infected birds.
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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 02-10-2007, 09:57 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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acidfast7
 
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wake me up when H5N1 starts to colonize the upper respiratory tract promiting human-to-human trasnfer.
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Old 02-12-2007, 01:57 PM acidfast7 is offline  
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TheMorlock
Contrary to my previous title I never fucked Inf's mother
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitebread View Post
What? I was questioning his frequent posting of bird flu articles.

WHAT DONT YOU UNDERSTAND?

The "spanish flu" pandemic ring a bell? It should ring TWO as the most deadly disease to sweep the world since the bubonic plague and as the SAME FUCKING BASE FLU THAT H5N1 is .

get it yet?

it was a year ago a worst case scenario. If it crosses well it MAY retain infection and death rates at the pandemic level. It has now been matched geneticly with the spanish flu pandemic virus they are nearly identical

if it crosses half a billion people will die in Developed countries compared to when international travel was rare and expensive. And only 13 million died
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There is nothing to worry about. Legions of wise people with nothing but all of best interests at heart are ensuring our future of love and infinite bliss. Go watch TV :Bflaps
http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?t=572323
Old 02-12-2007, 09:33 PM TheMorlock is offline  
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acidfast7
 
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Originally Posted by Doofy McMoreCOCK View Post
WHAT DONT YOU UNDERSTAND?

The "spanish flu" pandemic ring a bell? It should ring TWO as the most deadly disease to sweep the world since the bubonic plague and as the SAME FUCKING BASE FLU THAT H5N1 is .

get it yet?

it was a year ago a worst case scenario. If it crosses well it MAY retain infection and death rates at the pandemic level. It has now been matched geneticly with the spanish flu pandemic virus they are nearly identical

if it crosses half a billion people will die in Developed countries compared to when international travel was rare and expensive. And only 13 million died

you really are an idiot. and you need to work on your scientific vernacular.
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Old 02-13-2007, 08:25 AM acidfast7 is offline  
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Badger_sly
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doofy McMoreCOCK View Post
WHAT DONT YOU UNDERSTAND?

The "spanish flu" pandemic ring a bell? It should ....

Whitebread wasn't questioning the grave concern of the H5N1 virus. Everyone with any commonsense knows it is potentially a deadly disaster waiting to take off. I believe Whitebread was just wondering why curdledvomit posts so much news about it, which he explained.
Old 02-13-2007, 02:39 PM Badger_sly is offline  
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Whitebread
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doofy McMoreCOCK View Post
WHAT DONT YOU UNDERSTAND?

The "spanish flu" pandemic ring a bell? It should ring TWO as the most deadly disease to sweep the world since the bubonic plague and as the SAME FUCKING BASE FLU THAT H5N1 is .

get it yet?

it was a year ago a worst case scenario. If it crosses well it MAY retain infection and death rates at the pandemic level. It has now been matched geneticly with the spanish flu pandemic virus they are nearly identical

if it crosses half a billion people will die in Developed countries compared to when international travel was rare and expensive. And only 13 million died

You idiot, Badger_sly knows that I was talking about, I don't know why you can't.
Old 02-13-2007, 03:20 PM Whitebread is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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This from... http://www.iht.com/bin/print.php?id=4595221






Bird flu's risk far from over, experts warn
By Donald G. McNeil Jr.

Wednesday, February 14, 2007

Last winter, as the deadly bird flu virus marched out of Asia, across Europe and down into Africa, public health experts warned of the potential for a catastrophic pandemic like the Spanish flu of 1918.
This year, by contrast, bird flu seems all but forgotten, mentioned occasionally when it claims another life or when it causes an outbreak in, say, a British turkey farm. With flu season reaching its peak, the question for many people now is whether the threat they are facing is not Spanish flu but swine flu — another widely advertised menace that never materialized.
But that is premature, scientists say, warning that the bird flu virus is as dangerous and unpredictable as ever. It killed more people in 2006 than it did in 2005 or 2004, and its fatality rate is rising — 61 percent now, up from 43 percent in 2005.
More worrisome, they said, is that the disease is out of control in birds in more locations than ever, including places like the Nile Delta and Nigeria, where public health mechanisms are weak to nonexistent. That increases the chances of a mutation in the virus that would allow human-to-human transmission.
"I've gotten at least 10 media calls in the last few months asking me to deliver the death sentence for avian flu," said Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. "But at any conference, if you get a group of virologists at the bar, after the fourth beer, they let their hair down and admit it — they don't know what is happening. They've been incredibly humbled by this virus."
Since viruses with very high fatality rates, like Ebola, tend to burn themselves out by killing victims faster than they can pass it on, the increasing fatality rate — which is still unexplained — may be a silver lining of sorts.
But the virus has plenty of mutational wiggle room — the 1918 virus had a 2 percent fatality rate and still it killed 50 million to 100 million because it was so transmissible. That is why health experts remain cautious, warning that the pandemic could begin at any time, and that February is a particularly risky month.
Robert Webster, a virologist at St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, ended a talk with a slide of three animals in a reference to Asia. "We've survived the Year of the Chicken and the Year of the Dog," he said. "Will we survive the Year of the Pig?"
The Year of the Pig begins Sunday, and the Lunar New Year celebrations in China and Vietnam have become associated with flu outbreaks because so much poultry for family feasts is on the move. "My take-home message," Webster added, "is don't become complacent. Don't trust this one."
Poultry outbreaks in England and Hungary were not particularly worrisome, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization said. They may have been linked to shipments of raw turkey between plants in both countries, investigators said.
The British are very proficient at eliminating veterinary diseases by killing and incinerating animals, officials said, noting that more than 160,000 birds were swiftly killed to contain the British outbreak and that the Hungarians are believed capable of the same sort of response.
But the virus is out of control in poultry in three countries — Indonesia, Nigeria and Egypt — with combined populations of 447 million people. A year ago, it was out of control only in Indonesia, and Thailand and Vietnam had stifled outbreaks, although the virus returned. China remains a mystery — despite official denials, there is evidence that it is circulating there.
Most alarming to the experts, although it got relatively less attention, was the death last month of a 22-year-old Nigerian woman, an accountant who lived in the crowded financial capital, Lagos.
Officially, only one death from H5N1 was confirmed, but Nigerian newspapers said the woman's mother died with similar symptoms two weeks earlier, and a female relative was sick but recovered. If true, that suggests a cluster of cases with possible human-to-human transmission. Tests on them were negative, but human H5N1 tests are best done on fresh samples from deep in the lungs, which are hard to obtain, and false negatives are common.
In Nigeria, despite the culling of 700,000 birds, the flu has been found in 19 of 36 states, said the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.
Oyedele Oyediji, president of a Nigerian veterinarians' association, told local newspapers that bans on poultry movement and culling orders were simply not being enforced. "If you go to the markets in Lagos now," he said, "you would notice that poultry products like guinea fowl, ducks, turkey and chicken from the northern part of the country are still available."
Nigerian farmers have complained that government cullers pay them only $2 for chickens that cost them $5 to $7 to raise. But payments, supported by the World Bank, seem to be made fairly promptly through local police stations.
Indonesia, by contrast, provides farmers with $1 vouchers that may not be cashed for three or four months, said Tri Satya Putri Naipospos, the country's chief veterinarian. "It's our weakest implementation," she admitted. "It should be treated as an emergency, but we still follow routine budget mechanisms."
Eighty percent of all Indonesian households keep poultry, she said, the flu is in 30 of 33 provinces and still few take the threat seriously enough. "Farmers say dying chickens are normal in life," she said. "And you must realize that 62 dead people in one and a half years? That's not very much in Indonesia. Three hundred thousand die from TB, from dengue. People in the villages don't grab what is a pandemic."
The picture is not entirely bleak. Despite serious problems in Nigeria, Indonesia and Egypt's Nile Delta, Joseph Domenech, the chief veterinarian of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, said he thinks the prospects for controlling the spread in birds are "a lot better than three years ago or even one year ago."
For unknown reasons, possibly weather patterns and better poultry vaccination in northern China, not as many migrating swans and geese carried the virus up to Siberia, across Western Europe and down into Africa this winter as did last winter. The main culprit now in spreading the virus seems to be illegal or improper trade in poultry, health officials said.
Also, Domenech said, more poor countries have become alert to outbreaks, and either snuff them out or ask for outside help. For example, he said, the virus was found last year in spots from the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso to Niger and Cameroon, a 1,600-kilometer, or 1,000-mile, stretch of west Africa, in countries with "very weak animal health prevention." Despite nominal customs bans, Nigeria exports poultry throughout the region, he said.
"But we did not have any explosive outbreak," he said. "If it is explosive, you cannot miss it."
The virus has also been found in cats. That is not new; one of the most startling outbreaks killed 103 tigers in a Thai zoo in 2004. But no human has been known to have been infected by a cat.
World Health Organization reports almost always link human cases to proximity to dead poultry, but Naipospos, the Indonesian flu expert, released data at a flu conference in Washington on Feb. 1 calling that into question. In the 82 human cases studied, she said, only 45 percent of victims had direct exposure to sick poultry.
An additional 35 percent had "indirect" exposure, which meant sick birds in the neighborhood, and 20 percent were "inconclusive." "Unlike in Thailand and Vietnam," she said, "our risk factors are not clear." Virologists believe that the situation that must be avoided at all costs is to have humans with seasonal flu catch H5N1, too, because the viruses could mix.
Indonesia's best prevention against that, Naipospos said, is the "Tamiflu blanket." "We learned that in Garut," she said of a cluster of cases last August in West Java. More than 20 people died or suffered serious symptoms.
The government quickly gave the antiviral drug to more than 2,000 people.
Ultimately, only three cases in the cluster were confirmed, but scientists suspected some were missed and the drug suppressed the virus to undetectable levels in others.
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Old 02-15-2007, 12:10 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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