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this from...http://www.kuwaittimes.net/read_news...A4NTgzNDQ0OQ==


Bird flu tests on four Bangladeshis 'positive'

Published Date: April 05, 2007
By Rania El Gamal
KUWAIT: Preliminary blood tests taken from the four Bangladeshi workers suspected to be infected with the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu were found positive, Jamal Al-Duaij, Director of the Infectious Diseases Hospital told Kuwait Times yesterday. "The initial tests done here in Kuwait came positive. However, according to the regulations of the World Health Organisation (WHO), tests must be confirmed by another certified lab," said Al-Duaij. "The tests have been sent to Cairo, where the laboratories are certified by the WHO, and final results are expected to be received today," he added.
The four Bangladeshi workers who had been culling and burying chicken infected with the deadly bird flu virus in Wafra farms were admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital on Tuesday. "Though the four workers were suspected to be infected with the bird flu virus, there have been no obvious symptoms of the disease," said Al-Duaij. Bird flu symptoms vary from fever, cough, sore throat, fatigue to vomiting. "The Bangladeshi workers took protective doses before handling the infected birds, and that's why they showed no symptoms of the disease. We only knew that they might be infected from the results of the blood samples," he added.
Al-Duaij stated that the four workers are currently quarantined in a special ward in the hospital and are taking "a double-dose of Tamiflu: two tablets twice a day." He also added that Kuwait has enough stocks of drugs like Tamiflu to treat "not less than 200,000 persons in case of a virus epidemic."
Meanwhile, no more bird flu cases were detected during the last 24 hours in Kuwait, Dr Ahmad Al-Shatti, spokesman of the National Joint Committee for Combating Bird Flu, told Kuwait Times yesterday. "The committee held its annual meeting on Tuesday chaired by Health Minister Dr Maasouma Al-Mubarak to review the progress reports submitted by the Health Ministry and the Public Authority for Agriculture Affairs and Fish Resources (PAAAFR) about the bird flu's latest developments," he said.
On February 25, Kuwait announced the announced the outbreak of the deadly strain of the avian flu in the country leading to the culling of 1.7 million birds - 1.3 million of them egg-laying chickens - including turkeys, quails and even falcons, which are bred for hobbyists and are popular in the Gulf. A total of 106 cases of the virus have so far been confirmed in the state. Since the outbreak, 22 people have been admitted to hospital on suspicion of being infected, but later discharged. If the second tests from Egypt come positive, the four Bangladeshi workers might be the first human cases infected with the deadly H5N1 virus in Kuwait.
But more than a month after bird flu was detected, chicken and eggs are still on the menu in Kuwait, with imports assuring supply after two thirds of the state's egg-laying hens were culled. Kuwait has banned the import of live birds. Poultry shops have been closed since the end of February. But restaurateurs, scientists and poultry industry sources said that while poultry prices had risen, demand was being met with increased imports of frozen chicken from countries such as Brazil, India and France. "There are no problems with supplies. People are still ordering eggs and chickens," said Rana Al-Omani, who runs a fast food restaurant in downtown Kuwait City.
She said the price of fresh chicken breasts had risen by 50 per cent and eggs by 20 per cent in the last three weeks, but many consumers had not changed their eating habits. "I still eat chicken. I am not afraid of bird flu," said Kuwaiti engineer Badr, who was eating shawarma, a popular sandwich in the Middle East filled with grilled meat or chicken.
Experts said the full impact of the outbreak may not have been felt yet since suppliers were well stocked. "It is too early to say. We still have production from earlier, we still have it in the market. You don't feel the problem right now," said Afaf Al-Nasser, a food researcher at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR). She said Kuwait's poultry farming industry was still functioning since most cases of bird flu, particularly in hens, had been detected in farms in the remote desert area of Wafra near the Saudi border, slowing the spread. "There are still areas unaffected," she said.
According to a recent study by her institute, 47 per cent of poultry meat and 55 per cent of table eggs for local consumption were being produced in Kuwait, with the rest coming from abroad.
Poultry firms in Kuwait were reluctant to talk about bird flu, with one source saying they did not want to disclose damages until compensation talks with the government were over. Experts say major fast food chains such as McDonald's, Burger King and KFC, popular in Kuwait, were not strongly dependent on the local industry anyway.
Avian flu still mainly infects birds, but experts fear that if the H5N1 strain mutates into a form easily transmitted from person to person, it could sweep the world and kill millions. The human death toll is nearing 200 globally and Gulf Arab states host millions of foreigners from around the world. Although the impact on diets has been minimal, the outbreak has made some people think twice. "I was blowing eggs for the kids to decorate for Easter then I realised that it wasn't a good idea to be doing that, with bird flu going around," said a South African teacher, referring to a Christian holiday where children traditionally paint eggs. (With inputs from agencies)
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Old 04-04-2007, 06:07 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from... http://www.themoneytimes.com/article...id-103275.html


Egypt confirms 34th case of H5N1 strain


by Poonam Wadhwani - April 9, 2007 - 0 comments


Health officials in Egypt have confirmed that a teenage girl from Cairo's Shubra district has tested positive for the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, bringing the overall number of Egyptians who have got infected with the disease to 34 since it appeared in the country last year in February.
A Ministry spokesman Abdel Rahman Shahin reported Sunday that a 15-year-old girl, identified as Marina Kamil Mikhail from Cairo's Shubra district has been diagnosed with bird flu, the very first human case to hit the capital of the country.
Marina, the 34th person in to be infected with the disease, was admitted to hospital on Thursday (April, 5) with a very high fever, health ministry spokesperson said.
The girl, who according to health ministry got the H5N1 bird flu by coming in contact with birds who were infected with the virus, was treated with Tamiflu, a drug that is commonly used to treat the disease, and is in a stable condition, the said, adding that, the rest of her family is being tested for the disease.
The recently diagnosed case follows a two-year-old girl, named Fatma Farouk Abdul Gawwad from central Egypt, who had tested positive for the virus on Thursday and was transferred to hospital a day before with high fever. She was being treated with the same anti-viral drug, Tamiflu.
In Egypt, which accounts for the highest number of confirmed human bird flu cases outside Asia, the virus has engulfed 13 human lives since it first surfaced in the country's poultry a year ago, making it one of the worst-affected countries outside Asia.
The most common way to get the bird flu in Egypt is from birds, the ministry spokesman stated. Most of the victims infected in Egypt are women, as well as some children, who had contact with live birds kept in the backyards of homes.
Egypt is the Arab world's most populous country with more than 73 million people and a major route for migratory bird, consumes about 800 million fowl every year. The country detected the first bird flu case in dead poultry Feb 17, 2006, which then spread to 20 of the country's 26 governorates, and reported the first human bird flu case last year on March 18.
initially caused panic across Egypt that saw many Egyptians getting rid of their birds and did extensive damage to the poultry industry.
Since the virus re-emerged in Asia in 2003, has deadly H5N1 strain has infected 288 people and killed 170 of them, mostly in Southeast Asia, and the outbreaks have been confirmed in around 50 countries and territories, according to data from the WHO.
The Egyptian government says its national health ministry along with UNICEF is conducting a vigorous campaign to combat the spread of the through vaccinations and raising awareness, yet cases continue to appear.
Countries with confirmed human deaths due to the H5N1 strain are: Azerbaijan, , China, Egypt, Indonesia, Iraq, Laos, Nigeria, Thailand, Turkey and Vietnam. Health experts fear the strain could mutate into a form that spreads easily among human, sparking a pandemic.
Meanwhile, Cambodian government on Monday launched a week-long bird flu awareness blitz following the country's seventh death from the H5N1 virus. The campaign will feature marches and programmes conducted by government officials and bird flu specialists from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), and will centralize on rural areas, considering them most at risk for outbreaks.
WHO, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) in with United States are looking into minimizing the risk of spreading of this disease and taking steps to avoid this to turn into a pandemic on a global level.
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Old 04-09-2007, 12:35 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from...http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/ne...-vaccine-works


New Bug-Virus Flu Vaccine Works

In Case of Flu Pandemic, Technology Promises Faster Vaccine
By Daniel J. DeNoon
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

April 10, 2007 -- A flu vaccine made in insect cells works in humans, a small clinical study shows.
The new technology greatly speeds vaccine production and would save precious time if a flu pandemic breaks out.
University of Rochester flu researcher John Treanor, MD, is a researcher for the study in which 306 healthy adults got a single injection of the bug-cell flu vaccine.
"Even though the study was small, the results are very promising," Treanor said in a news release. "We've shown that the vaccine does work in the real world."
Treanor and colleagues at Cincinnati Children's Hospital and the University of Virginia report their findings in the April 11 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.
New Flu Vaccine Needs No Eggs

All of the currently approved flu vaccines are made in hens' eggs. That spells trouble for people with egg allergies. It spells even more trouble for vaccine makers.
Hundreds of millions of live, fertilized eggs are needed each year to make the world's flu vaccines. Each flu virus has to be specially adapted to grow in eggs. And technicians have to handle live viruses, creating safety issues.
These problems would be exponentially more troublesome if the current H5N1 bird flu virus becomes a human flu pandemic. As bad as this virus is for humans, it kills virtually 100% of infected chickens. That could doom a flu vaccine before it even gets off the ground.
Cell-based flu vaccine production systems use genetically engineered viruses to produce vaccine ingredients -- pieces of flu virus, not live virus itself.
The system tested by Treanor and colleagues uses an insect called a baculovirus to produce flu vaccine. The vaccine, FluBlOk from Protein Sciences Corp., can be made in one or two months less time than it takes to make an egg-based vaccine.
Humans Protected

During the 2004-2005 flu season, Treanor and colleagues tested a FluBlOk vaccine containing the same vaccine ingredients as the current flu vaccine. Blood tests showed that the vaccine stimulated at least as much antiflu immunity as the currently approved vaccine usually does.
There were only two cases of flu among the vaccine recipients, while there were seven flu cases among the people who got mock vaccinations.
Interestingly, during the 2004-2005 flu season, the normal flu vaccine was not a good match for the flu "drift variant" type A H3N2 flu virus that circulated that year. However, the bug-cell-produced vaccine did seem to provide protection against the mismatch virus.
"Preliminary evidence of protection against a drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus was obtained, but the sample size was small," Treanor and colleagues note.
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 04-10-2007, 08:34 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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Whitebread
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by curdledvomit View Post
this from...http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/ne...-vaccine-works


New Bug-Virus Flu Vaccine Works

In Case of Flu Pandemic, Technology Promises Faster Vaccine
By Daniel J. DeNoon
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

April 10, 2007 -- A flu vaccine made in insect cells works in humans, a small clinical study shows.
The new technology greatly speeds vaccine production and would save precious time if a flu pandemic breaks out.
University of Rochester flu researcher John Treanor, MD, is a researcher for the study in which 306 healthy adults got a single injection of the bug-cell flu vaccine.
"Even though the study was small, the results are very promising," Treanor said in a news release. "We've shown that the vaccine does work in the real world."
Treanor and colleagues at Cincinnati Children's Hospital and the University of Virginia report their findings in the April 11 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.
New Flu Vaccine Needs No Eggs

All of the currently approved flu vaccines are made in hens' eggs. That spells trouble for people with egg allergies. It spells even more trouble for vaccine makers.
Hundreds of millions of live, fertilized eggs are needed each year to make the world's flu vaccines. Each flu virus has to be specially adapted to grow in eggs. And technicians have to handle live viruses, creating safety issues.
These problems would be exponentially more troublesome if the current H5N1 bird flu virus becomes a human flu pandemic. As bad as this virus is for humans, it kills virtually 100% of infected chickens. That could doom a flu vaccine before it even gets off the ground.
Cell-based flu vaccine production systems use genetically engineered viruses to produce vaccine ingredients -- pieces of flu virus, not live virus itself.
The system tested by Treanor and colleagues uses an insect called a baculovirus to produce flu vaccine. The vaccine, FluBlOk from Protein Sciences Corp., can be made in one or two months less time than it takes to make an egg-based vaccine.
Humans Protected

During the 2004-2005 flu season, Treanor and colleagues tested a FluBlOk vaccine containing the same vaccine ingredients as the current flu vaccine. Blood tests showed that the vaccine stimulated at least as much antiflu immunity as the currently approved vaccine usually does.
There were only two cases of flu among the vaccine recipients, while there were seven flu cases among the people who got mock vaccinations.
Interestingly, during the 2004-2005 flu season, the normal flu vaccine was not a good match for the flu "drift variant" type A H3N2 flu virus that circulated that year. However, the bug-cell-produced vaccine did seem to provide protection against the mismatch virus.
"Preliminary evidence of protection against a drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus was obtained, but the sample size was small," Treanor and colleagues note.

Fantastic, first promising report in a string of worrying stories.
Old 04-13-2007, 09:39 AM Whitebread is offline  
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this from... http://www.ecanadanow.com/science/he...-in-indonesia/



H5N1 Bird Flu Virus Claims 75th Life In Indonesia



Jakarta (eCanadaNow) - A 29-year-old woman has died of bird-flu in Indonesia, bringing the country’s total number of human deaths from the H5N1 strain of the virus to 75, a health official said Tuesday. The womman, identified only as An from Riau province on eastern Sumatra, died on May 3 after undergoing two days of treatment in a hospital in North Sumatra capital of Medan, said Joko Suyanto, as official at the Health Ministry’s bird-flu information centre.
Suyanto said she was admitted to a hospital in Pekanbaru, the provincial capital of Riau, on April 27 suffering from fever, cough and respiratory problems. On May 1, she was referred to another hospital in Medan.
“Two local tests for her came back positive of H5N1,” Suyanto told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa, adding that it was still unclear how the woman contracted the virus and investigations are underway.
Suyanto said the woman’s death brings the toll from the H5N1 virus in Indonesia to 75 deaths out of 95 human cases, and is the highest in the world for bird-flu deaths. This year alone, the H5N1 avian influenza virus has claimed the lives of 18 people in the country.
Alarmed by a sudden spike in bird-flu deaths early this year, the Indonesian government declared a ban on backyard poultry farms in residential areas of nine provinces.
In addition, the government also placed tight restrictions on the movement and sale of poultry and poultry products across the nine provinces and is preparing more hospitals to treat human cases of the virus.
Most bird-flu victims around the world have had direct or indirect contact with sick birds, but scientists fear the virus could mutate into a form that is easily transmissible among humans, sparking a global pandemic that could kill millions.
Indonesia agreed in March to an immediate resumption of sharing bird-flu samples with the World Health Organization (WHO) after a breakthrough was reached in international talks to develop a new mechanism on sample-sharing.
But nearly a month after, the samples have not been sent and Indonesia says it would not sharing samples until the country receives certain guarantees in writing.
Indonesia began withholding samples from WHO in February after an Australian company developed a vaccine for commercial sale using an Indonesian sample without Jakarta’s knowledge. The government also expressed concerns that drug firms would use them to develop costly vaccines beyond poorer countries’ budgets.
Amid a standoff with WHO over sharing its bird-flu samples, Indonesia in February signed a memorandum of understanding with US vaccine producer Baxter International about possible future collaboration or supply agreements.
© 2007 DPA
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Old 05-08-2007, 08:55 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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TheMorlock
Contrary to my previous title I never fucked Inf's mother
 
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Originally Posted by Whitebread View Post
Fantastic, first promising report in a string of worrying stories.

Yeah only 60 million will die instead of a billion and a half
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Old 05-08-2007, 10:40 AM TheMorlock is offline  
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Yeah only 60 million will die instead of a billion and a half

60 million, while horrible in and of itself is not quite as bad as a billion and a half.
Old 05-08-2007, 03:32 PM Whitebread is offline  
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Contrary to my previous title I never fucked Inf's mother
 
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Quote:
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60 million, while horrible in and of itself is not quite as bad as a billion and a half.



Just pick our your coastal african or chinese real estate now.
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There is nothing to worry about. Legions of wise people with nothing but all of best interests at heart are ensuring our future of love and infinite bliss. Go watch TV :Bflaps
http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?t=572323
Old 05-08-2007, 10:44 PM TheMorlock is offline  
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Quote:
All of the currently approved flu vaccines are made in hens' eggs....As bad as this virus is for humans, it kills virtually 100% of infected chickens.
so god does have a sense of humor
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Old 05-08-2007, 10:53 PM möbiustrip is offline  
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this from... http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/con...indonesia.html


WHO confirms backlog of 15 Indonesian H5N1 cases

Lisa Schnirring Staff Writer

May 16, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) today recognized 15 H5N1 avian influenza cases from Indonesia dating back to late January, a few weeks after the country stopped sending H5N1 virus samples to the WHO as a protest against developing nations' lack of equal access to pandemic vaccines.
The 15 cases now recognized by the WHO include 13 fatal ones, raising the WHO count for Indonesia to 96 cases with 76 deaths. The announcement pushes Indonesia past Vietnam, with 93 cases and 42 deaths, as the country hardest hit by avian flu and boosts the global H5N1 count to 306 cases with 185 deaths.
The WHO's move came the day after Indonesia's health minister, Siti Fadilah Supari, announced at the World Health Assembly in Geneva that the country had resumed sending virus samples to the WHO. But it was not clear if there was a connection between Supari's announcement and the WHO action.
In its statement today, the WHO said it had previously required external confirmation of lab results from Indonesia, but after a formal on-site assessment of the national laboratory's capacity to diagnose H5 avian flu viruses, the agency would now accept the country's results without outside confirmation. The WHO said Indonesia's national laboratory tests avian flu samples in collaboration with the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, a Jakarta-based research facility that is closely aligned with the government's research and technology ministry.
The WHO's case confirmations apparently are based on previous results from Indonesia's national laboratory, not on samples that Indonesia said it sent to the WHO collaborating laboratory in Tokyo. The WHO statement does not mention testing of any of the samples recently supplied by Indonesia. Two media reports today, by Canadian Press (CP) and New Scientist, said Indonesia sent only three samples.
Gregory Hartl, a WHO spokesperson, told CIDRAP News by e-mail that from now on the WHO would recognize the cases Indonesia confirms because its lab is now accredited, signaling that future WHO confirmation of Indonesian cases will not be conditioned on sharing of virus samples.
The WHO appears to have confirmed nearly all the H5N1 cases reported by Indonesian health officials since late January. The one apparent exception is the case of a 9-year-old boy who, according to a Jakarta Post report at the time, died in a hospital in Garut, West Java, on Feb 11. Few details about his case were available.
Though the lapse in the WHO's reporting of H5N1 cases from Indonesia appears to be over, the dispute over virus sharing apparently is not. Indonesian officials told experts meeting in Geneva that they would not send more samples until more progress is made on a new agreement to ensure that developing nations receive fair access to vaccines made from the samples they supply, New Scientist reported today.
Yesterday, 17 developing countries, including Indonesia, introduced a resolution at the World Health Assembly demanding equitable access to vaccines, drugs, and other medical products derived from H5N1 samples the countries provide, Reuters reported. The resolution also would require researchers and vaccine developers to seek informed consent from countries that contribute the viruses before using them.
Sharing of avian flu virus samples is vital to the research community for developing pandemic vaccines and monitoring the virus's ability to infect humans, global spread, and resistance to drugs.
WHO Director-General Margaret Chan, at a technical briefing at the Geneva meeting today, said the WHO recognizes the concerns of developing countries and is taking several actions to ensure that they have access to affordable pandemic vaccines, Reuters reported.
However, she used strong words in a plea for unrestricted virus sharing, the Reuters report said. "If you do not share the virus with us, I want to be absolutely honest with you, I will fail you," Chan said. "I will fail you because you are tying my hands, you are muffling my ears, you are blinding my eyes."
On Apr 25, WHO officials, after meeting with governments and vaccine producers, said it might be feasible to set up a world stockpile of H5N1 influenza vaccine to help ensure that developing countries have access to pandemic flu vaccines. The WHO said it would set up expert groups to discuss how to create, maintain, fund, and use an H5N1 vaccine stockpile and would continue working with member states and other partners on the problem of access to pandemic vaccines.
David Heymann, WHO's assistant director-general for communicable diseases, has said a stockpile of 40 million to 60 million doses is being considered, which would allow developing countries to vaccinate essential workers, such as police and healthcare workers, according to the CP story today.
However, Supari said yesterday that Indonesia would need 22 million doses of vaccine, which would protect about 10% of the country's population, the CP report said.
Just before the Apr 25 meeting, the WHO also announced it was awarding grants to six countries to help them develop the capacity to make flu vaccines. The grants of up to $2.5 million each will go to three countries hit hard by H5N1 avian flu—Indonesia, Vietnam, and Thailand—plus Brazil, Mexico, and India, the WHO said. The money will come from $10 million supplied by the United States and $8 million from Japan.
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 05-17-2007, 10:15 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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Old 05-17-2007, 10:21 AM Gullop is offline  
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http://www.emergencyemail.org/birdflumapwang3.asp



map of the world and where the flu is now....look up near Alaska....
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

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Old 07-12-2007, 12:45 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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I'm surprised it hasn't infected any human in India yet, given their population.
Old 07-12-2007, 02:10 PM Badger_sly is offline  
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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 08-15-2007, 08:09 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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What happened with your perpetual motion machine guy? Last I heard there were some technical difficulties from the overhead lighting.
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Old 08-15-2007, 08:21 AM möbiustrip is offline  
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