General [M]ayhem

Go Back   General [M]ayhem > Real Time Sub-Forums > The Pit
Register Members List Mark Forums Read [M]erchandise Calendar

Reply
 
Thread Tools
McGee
seriously, i'm the worst poster here...really
 
McGee's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustInTehLurk
snip.
lol
__________________
formerly McGee
Old 08-02-2006, 10:44 AM McGee is offline  
Reply With Quote
#811  

Advertisement [Remove Advertisement]

curdledvomit
 
curdledvomit's Avatar
 
this from http://www.bangkokpost.com/News/04Aug2006_news10.php


BIRD FLU / MOUNTING CONCERN OVER OUTBREAK

Girl, 9, dies; suspected infections soar to 164
POST REPORTERS

A medical worker shows the various forms of oseltamivir, or Tamiflu. The Government Pharmaceutical Organisation says a local, generic form of the drug, known as GPO-A-Flu, will be distributed to state hospitals by next year, reducing reliance on imports from overseas. APICHIT JINAKUL



There is mounting concern over the fourth round of bird flu to hit the country. A nine-year-old girl from Lop Buri province died from bird-flu like symptoms yesterday as the number of suspected human cases surged to 164 in 21 provinces.

The girl was Lop Buri's first suspected bird flu case since the current outbreak was confirmed in Phichit on July 24, said Pranom Khamtiang, Lop Buri's chief public health officer.

Results of laboratory tests on the girl's tissue to determine if she was infected with the H5N1 avian flu virus were due out today.

However, livestock officials said the girl was unlikely to have flu as there had been no reports of fowls dying unusually in her village.

Two new suspected bird flu cases were reported in the eastern province of Chachoengsao yesterday. Both patients work in a duck processing plant where they handle the carcasses.

They had developed influenza symptoms over the past few days. Samples taken from them have been sent for diagnosis at a Bangkok laboratory.

Paijit Warachit, director-general of the Medical Sciences Department, said there were 164 suspected bird flu cases in 21 provinces so far, with 107 of them from Phichit.

No new cases of bird flu had been confirmed in the past 10 days.

The latest confirmed case was a 17-year-old man from Phichit province who died from the H5N1 virus on July 24.

The Government Pharmaceutical Organisation (GPO) yesterday announced that locally-made oseltamivir, the only drug known to be effective in the treatment of bird flu patients, would be distributed to state hospitals by next year.

The generic drug, given the name GPO-A-Flu, will cost about 70 baht a tablet.

It is made from an extract of the herbpuay kuk, or star anise, which Thailand had to import from India.

GPO managing director Mongkol Jivasantikarn said the anti-viral medicine was still undergoing a series of tests to ensure that its quality was equal to the original version of oseltamivir, better known by its trade name Tamiflu.

He also revealed the GPO plans to co-invest with China in the mass production of GPO-A-Flu for commercial purposes, and to build up stockpiles against a potential outbreak of avian flu. He declined to name the Chinese pharmaceutical firm.

The overall process of commercial production could take at least another two years, the GPO chief said.

Caretaker Deputy Public Health Minister Anuthin Chanveerakul said the project would enable the government to meet its target of stockpiling one million doses of oseltamivir, which should be enough to deal with a human pandemic should one occur.

Thailand had a current stockpile of 300,000 courses of oseltamivir, he said.

Caretaker Deputy Agriculture and Cooperatives Minister Adisorn Piengkes said the ministry would send a team to Laos next week for discussions on a programme for joint Thai-Lao bird flu control measures.

The move follows a bird flu outbreak in the northeastern province of Nakhon Phanom, bordering Laos, early this week.

About 300,000 chickens have since died or been culled in the province.

Some Thai officials have said the outbreak might have been caused by cross-border poultry trade with ''a neighbouring country''.

The Vientiane government was reportedly ''disappointed'' by the claim.

Mr Adisorn said he had received a phone call from former Lao ambassador to Thailand Hiem Phommachanh on Wednesday, expressing concern about the comments.

This prompted Thai officials to seek a meeting with their Lao counterparts to discuss the situation and to seek future cooperation, he said.

''Both countries have bird flu and this virus knows no boundaries,'' the minister said.

''So the two countries should work together in order to control it.''
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 08-04-2006, 09:10 AM curdledvomit is offline  
Reply With Quote
#812  

jim87654
Sponsored by SimHQ.com
 
^Are you the new travis?
__________________
Louis Potgieter (1951-1996) NEVER FORGET
ef70337154d8a0a9dc8d89a9d01bb579 [y yuo throw haet :( :(] porn may <3's yuo.
Old 08-04-2006, 11:24 AM jim87654 is offline  
Reply With Quote
#813  

curdledvomit
 
curdledvomit's Avatar
 
this from http://www........./2006/HEALTH/08/14/bird.flu.ap/


Reported U.S. bird flu probably no human threat, feds say




Monday, August 14, 2006; Posted: 1:31 p.m. EDT (17:31 GMT)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists have discovered the possible presence of bird flu in the United States -- in wild swans near the banks of Lake Erie -- but it does not appear to be the worrisome strain that the government has long feared.

Routine tests on two seemingly healthy wild mute swans in Michigan suggest they might have the H5N1 virus; confirmatory tests are under way.

But other testing has ruled out that it could the so-called highly pathogenic version of that virus that has ravaged poultry in Asia, and killed at least 138 people worldwide, the Agriculture Department announced Monday.

"This is not the highly pathogenic avian influence virus that has spread through much of other parts of the world," said Ron DeHaven, administrator of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

"We do not believe this virus represents a risk to human health," he declared.

Still, if it is the low-pathogenic version of H5N1, it wouldn't be the first time even that version of H5N1 has been spotted in the United States. The low-pathogenic virus was found in wild ducks in 1975 and 1986, and on a Michigan turkey farm in 2002, USDA officials said. A similar low-pathogenic version was found in Canada last year.

Despite the lack of human risk, federal officials said they were announcing the apparent discovery as a sign of openness about the $29 million effort to check for signs that H5N1 is posing a renewed threat to U.S. birds.

"We remain vigilant and prepared," said Dr. William Raub, science adviser to the Department of Health and Human Services.

The deadly version of the H5N1 virus has killed at least 138 people worldwide since beginning its global march in late 2003. But virtually all caught the virus from close contact with sick birds or their droppings.

Scientists had feared that the deadly form of the virus would reach North America -- in birds -- sometime this year. Just last week, the United States expanded monitoring of wild migratory birds throughout the nation, to check for early signs.

Health officials are closely watching H5N1 for fear the virus eventually could mutate into a strain that could spread easily from person-to-person, possibly sparking a worldwide epidemic. No one knows how likely that is to happen, and specialists agree that the risk doesn't jump even if a few infected birds are found to have entered the United States.

Still, even the low-pathogenic H5N1 requires monitoring, because it has the potential to mutate into the highly pathogenic form -- the kind that rapidly kills birds, especially poultry. If it were found in the United States, that would trigger additional security steps to prevent wild birds from infecting commercial poultry flocks.
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 08-14-2006, 12:19 PM curdledvomit is offline  
Reply With Quote
#814  

Janet Reno
fort fagg
Mommy says I was suppose to be an abortion.
 
Janet Reno's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Cruise
oh and curdle for the lvoe of God please shut the fuck up

easy, it is a passion. i think fearing bad health is actually very bad for your health, but if this interests him i guess he can go ahead

its the desire to 'keep others aware' that troubles me. panic mongering.
__________________
I used to be fort fagg.
Co-president of [M] Beautiful People's club.
Insomniac Krew will never die [or sleep]
skra[M] krew nurga █▄ ■ █▄
Old 08-14-2006, 12:23 PM Janet Reno is offline  
Reply With Quote
#815  

curdledvomit
 
curdledvomit's Avatar
 
this from http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...=latin_america


Jackie Chan Hired by UN to Warn of Bird Flu Danger (Update2)

Aug. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Jackie Chan, martial arts star of movies such as ``Rush Hour'' and ``Rush Hour 2,'' was hired by the United Nations to lead a television campaign to be broadcast globally that highlights the dangers of bird flu.

Chan, 52, who broke into Hollywood with ``Rumble in the Bronx'' in 1995, appears in a 1-minute public service announcement that explains the risk to children of contracting avian influenza from sick or dead birds, the UN said today in a statement. Chan's presentation is produced by the UN Children's Fund, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization, with funding from the government of Japan.

``This is not about creating alarm but helping children be more alert and careful,'' Chan said in a UN statement. ``When it comes to bird flu, we don't want to take any chances with our kids.''

The UN agencies are leading a campaign to help stem the spread of the H5N1 avian flu strain, which has infected 238 people, killing 139 of them since 2003, mostly in Asia. It may kill millions should it start spreading easily among people.

Human H5N1 fatalities have almost tripled this year as the virus spread in wild birds and domestic poultry to at least 38 countries. Almost all cases have been linked to close contact with sick or dead birds, such as children playing with them or adults butchering them, according to the WHO.

The television announcement ``aims to harness the influence and popularity of Jackie Chan to reach the maximum number of households and will be broadcast as widely as possible,'' the agencies said in their statement.

Goodwill Ambassador

Chan, a Unicef goodwill ambassador, filmed the announcement at Sha Tin Junior School in his native Hong Kong. The city's Star TV will start broadcasting it today on its network in English with Chinese subtitles. In other Asian countries, the announcement will be broadcast in the dominant languages, said Tani Ruiz, a communication officer with Unicef in Bangkok.

``It was great to work with this group of children on something that concerns Asia and the entire world,'' Chan said.

Since 2003, H5N1 has infected birds in more than 50 countries. In Asia, where it first appeared, more than 220 million fowl have been culled as a consequence of outbreaks, the FAO said this month in a report.

More than 200,000 poultry were culled to stem the spread of an outbreak reported on a duck farm in Changsha city in the central Chinese province of Hunan, China's Ministry of Agriculture said on its Web site.

The outbreak, the first in China since July 14 and the 38th reported among poultry nationwide since October last year, began earlier this month, the ministry said.

China has reported 21 human H5N1 cases, 14 of them fatal. The most recent death occurred last month in the western region of Xinjiang. The fatality was confirmed by China's Ministry of Health on Aug. 14.


To contact the reporter for this story:
Jason Gale in Singapore at j.gale@bloomberg.net
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 08-16-2006, 06:04 AM curdledvomit is offline  
Reply With Quote
#816  

Jester
 
Jester's Avatar
 
shut up
__________________


WHO LIKES TO ROCK THE PARTY? WHO LIKES TO ROCK THE PARTY?

_
Old 08-16-2006, 06:17 AM Jester is offline  
Reply With Quote
#817  

awesomepossum
 
awesomepossum's Avatar
 
well we still ain't dead
__________________
ಥ_ಠ ల_ల ޞ_ޞ૪_૪
Old 08-16-2006, 07:00 AM awesomepossum is offline  
Reply With Quote
#818  

dirty sanchez
 
zomg!! jackie chan?!?!?!?!

i'm soooooo not playing w/dead bird corpses once i see this commercial!!!!
__________________
"And it is written that every day shall be Caturday!"

FREE BERTICUS!!

(Philly) PA krew re%

a better [M] for a better tomorrow!!- http://www.genmay.com/group.php?groupid=21

Vendetta for Congress, 2012! - Change you really, really want!
Old 08-16-2006, 09:24 AM dirty sanchez is offline  
Reply With Quote
#819  

curdledvomit
 
curdledvomit's Avatar
 
this from http://www.sci-tech-today.com/story....d=111002CIZMJO


Expert: Massive Flu Pandemic Is Imminent


August 21, 2006 8:23AM

History shows that over the past three centuries, a new pandemic has emerged at least every 50 years, and experts believe we may be due for the next one. The likely culprit is the H5N1 virus, known as avian influenza. To date, the virus has not spread regularly from human to human, but scientists believe it is only a matter of time before it mutates into a form that allows that kind of transmission.

Sometime in the very near future, the next influenza pandemic will sweep across the globe, infecting billions, killing millions, crippling health care systems and bringing economies to a halt. This, a leading expert on infectious disease told an audience Thursday, is not a guess. It's not a theory or a worst-case scenario. It is a sure thing.

That's the bad news, said Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.

The good news is there still is time to soften the blow.

"The issue is not if, it's when, so we have to prepare," Osterholm said. "The worst thing we can do is not prepare and think it will not happen.

"The truth of the matter is, there's a lot we can do about it," he said.

Osterholm, who has discussed pandemic influenza on CNN, "Nightline" and "The Oprah Winfrey Show," brought his knowledge of the subject to a town hall meeting hosted by the McHenry County Department of Health.

A flu pandemic, Osterholm said, occurs when a new influenza strain emerges that is readily transmitted among humans, is genetically unique to earlier strains and possesses increased virulence, or the ability to kill.

The last time a pandemic occurred was in 1968 when H3N2 -- better known as Hong Kong flu -- emerged, killing an estimated 700,000 worldwide, including nearly 40,000 in the United States.

History shows that over the past three centuries, a new pandemic has emerged at least every 50 years, and experts believe we may be due for the next one. The likely culprit is the H5N1 virus, known as avian influenza. To date, the virus has not spread regularly from human to human, but scientists believe it is only a matter of time before it mutates into a form that allows that kind of transmission.

Osterholm, a consultant for the U.S. departments of Homeland Security and Human Services, believes when it does it will kill at least 2.7 million worldwide and as many as 360 million in a worst- case scenario.

And if that happens, Osterholm predicts, it will overwhelm limited federal and state resources, leaving communities to fend for themselves.

To do that Osterholm said, communities need to start today at creating leadership networks, planning relief efforts and building health-care strategies in their local areas.

"Nobody in Washington or even Springfield is going to be here to help you, so you need to start thinking about this now," he said. "No investment you ever make in this is going to be wasted."

Although Osterholm said he believes tough times are ahead when the pandemic hits, he said despairing over it is no more of a solution than hoping it never comes.

"Every population that endured one of these has survived it," he said. "We just have to keep telling ourselves that."

2006 Chicago Daily Herald. All rights reserved.
2006 Sci-Tech Today. All rights reserved.
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 08-21-2006, 12:58 PM curdledvomit is offline  
Reply With Quote
#820  

curdledvomit
 
curdledvomit's Avatar
 
this from http://www.medpagetoday.com/Infectio...theFlu/tb/4011

Convalescent Plasma Might Lessen H5N1 Mortality


By Michael Smith, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
August 29, 2006

MedPage Today Action Points
  • Advise patients who ask that the H5N1 avian flu strain is so far mainly confined to birds, and appears so far to lack the ability to be transmitted easily from person to person.
  • Note that this study suggests a possible treatment for some of the complications of flu infection, based on therapies that were tried with some success during the Spanish flu pandemic in the early years of last century.
  • Caution that clinical trials will be needed to determine if the treatment -- using blood products from people convalescing from the disease -- works in cases of H5N1 infection.
Additional URI & the Flu Coverage Review
WASHINGTON, Aug. 29 -- An empirical therapy used to battle the Spanish flu early in the 20th century may be a valuable tool if the 21st century avian flu turns into a human pandemic, researchers here suggested.



In the face of the 1918-1919 Spanish flu pandemic, physicians in several centers used serum from convalescing patients as a treatment for the pneumonia that was killing many of their patients, according to Thomas Luke, M.D., of the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Medicine and Surgery.



A meta-analysis of eight reports of those treatments suggested that they might have been on the right track, Dr. Luke and colleagues reported in the Aug. 29 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.



Patients with influenza pneumonia had what appears to be a "clinically important benefit" when they were given blood products from those who were recovering from the illness, Dr. Luke and colleagues said.



The finding may be important if the H5N1 strain of avian influenza, now raging in parts of Asia, becomes a pandemic human strain, because one convalescing patient could produce plasma "sufficient to treat multiple patients with H5N1 influenza," the researchers said.



The eight studies involved 1,703 patients, the researchers said. Treated patients, often selected because of more severe illness, were compared with untreated controls with influenza pneumonia in the same hospital or ward.



All eight showed a benefit for the treatment, with an overall crude case-fatality rate of 16% (54 of 336) among treated patients and 37% (452 of 1,219) among controls, for a 21-percentage-point difference in mortality risk.



Across the studies, the difference in mortality risk for treated patients compared to controls ranged from 8% to 26%.



There was also a benefit for early treatment -- before the fourth day of pneumonia complications. Overall, the crude case-fatality rate was 19% (28 of 148) among patients who received early treatment 59% (49 of 83) among patients who received treatment after four or more days of pneumonia complications.



Adverse effects included chill reactions and possible exacerbations of symptoms in a few patients, the researchers said.



The finding, however, should not be taken as a gold standard, the researchers said. There were only a few studies and they all had methodological limitations. In particular, none of them was a blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.



Also, there were no standard dosages and definitions, disruptions caused by World War I may have hindered the ability to record data, and wartime censorship may have led to publication bias, the researchers said.



Nonetheless, the data imply, Dr. Luke and colleagues said, that "convalescent human H5N1 plasma could be an effective, timely, and widely available treatment for patients with H5N1 influenza during outbreaks and pandemics."



Clinical trials should test the idea, they argued.



That suggestion was echoed in an accompanying editorial by John Treanor, M.D., of the University of Rochester (N.Y.) Medical Center. "Controlled clinical studies done now will probably pay a considerable dividend when the pandemic begins," Dr. Treanor argued.



Despite the limitations of the original studies, "the concept is important and it should be explored further, especially given our lack of proven interventions to prevent or treat illness due to H5N1 influenza," he said.



Many hurdles exist, Dr. Treanor noted. For one thing, it is not even known yet whether patients who recover from H5N1 influenza have high levels of antibody. Also, the understanding of the human immune response to H5N1 infection is not complete and it isn't known what level of antibody will confer protection, or what dose of serum would produce useful antibody levels in patients.



The H5N1 avian flu strain has so far shown little sign of easy human-to-human transmission, which would be essential for it to become a pandemic. However, when humans have caught the disease, usually from infected birds, it has had a high case fatality rate. As of Aug. 23, the World Health Organization reported 241 cases, resulting in 141 deaths.
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 08-30-2006, 07:23 AM curdledvomit is offline  
Reply With Quote
#821  

-espionage-
 
hey guys wasnt this supposed to kill the earth like last year? yeah, stfu already
__________________
How many Jeeps would an Isajeep Jeep if an Isajeep could Jeep Jeeps?
Old 08-30-2006, 12:51 PM -espionage- is offline  
Reply With Quote
#822  

curdledvomit
 
curdledvomit's Avatar
 
this from http://www.farmfutures.com/ME2/dirmo...B41DD8BE918B47


Pennsylvania Ducks Found with Low-Path Avian Flu Like the Maryland find announced Friday, test samples from latest batch are getting a further look at Ames lab. (9/4/2006) Farm Futures staff USDA and the Department of the Interior announced over the weekend that the presense of H5 and N1 avian influenza subtypes have been found in samples from wild mallard ducks in Pennsylvania. Testing has ruled out this being the highly pathogentic H5N1 strain spreading throughout Asia, Europe and Africa. Tests so far indicate this is the low pathogenic avian influenza, and poses no threat to human health.

The ducks were sampled Aug. 28 in Crawford County, Penn. The birds showed no signs of sickness, which also suggests a low-path strain. USDA and DOI are cooperatively sampling wild birds throughout the United States for the presence of the highly pathogenic strain of avian flu; and the extended testing program boosts the chances of finding more cases of low-path influenza-infected birds.

Confirmatory tests are underway at USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratory, that will better clarify whether one or more strains of the virus are present, the specific subtype and confirm the pathogenicity. Results are expected within two to three weeks.
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 09-04-2006, 08:16 AM curdledvomit is offline  
Reply With Quote
#823  

logie
Do what now?
 
logie's Avatar
 
its been a week, time for a bump
__________________
VW Drivers Club - '03 VW Jetta 1.8T Wolfsburg Edition - Tornado Red
(add this to your sig you volkswagen addicts)
Old 09-11-2006, 05:34 PM logie is offline  
Reply With Quote
#824  

curdledvomit
 
curdledvomit's Avatar
 
this from http://northafrica.andnetwork.com/in...tory&sp=l51747


South Sudan reports first case of bird flu

September 12, 2006, 49 minutes and 1 second ago. By Motshidisi Baloyi Johannesburg (AND) The first case of bird flu has been reported in Juba, south Sudan.
According to the chairperson of the National Task Force, Dr Sam Okware, the outbreak of the disease, which is affecting local chicken, was confirmed on 6 September.

Dr Okware said in a statement that people at the country borders should be on high alert for any suspicious birds or poultry products being brought into the country.

He has also directed the district health officers and district veterinary officers to strengthen their task forces on bird flu to enhance surveillance and public education.

Bird flu, also known as avian influenza, is commonly used to refer to infection from a particular subtype of influenza A virus (H5N1), which can cause severe illness in humans who are infected.

Currently the strain, which is virulent in birds, is transmitted by contact with infected birds and has been transmitted from one person to another in a few cases.

Johannesburg Bureau, AND
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 09-12-2006, 09:20 AM curdledvomit is offline  
Reply With Quote
#825  

Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:04 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.