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this from... http://www.breitbart.com/article.php...show_article=1



Chile confirms swine flu in turkeys
Aug 21 02:12 PM US/Eastern
By FEDERICO QUILODRAN
Associated Press Writer


SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) - Chile said Friday that tests show swine flu has jumped to birds, opening a new chapter in the global epidemic. Top flu and animal-health experts with the United Nations in Rome and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta were monitoring the situation closely, but said the infected turkeys have suffered only mild effects, easing concern about a potentially dangerous development.

Chile's turkey meat remains safe to eat, they said, and so far there have been no signs of a potentially dangerous mutation.
Chile's health ministry said it ordered a quarantine Friday for two turkey farms outside the port city of Valparaiso after genetic tests confirmed sick birds were afflicted with the same virus that has caused a pandemic among humans.
So far, the virus—a mixture of human, pig and bird genes—has proved to be very contagious but no more deadly than common seasonal flu. However, virus experts fear a more dangerous and easily transmitted strain could emerge if it combines again with avian flu, which is far more deadly but tougher to pass along.
The farms' owner, Sopraval SA, alerted the agriculture ministry after egg production dropped at the farms this month. After initial tests on four samples, further genetic testing confirmed a match with the subtype A/H1N1 2009, the agriculture and health ministries announced.
"What the turkeys have is the human virus—there is no mutation at all," Deputy Health Minister Jeannette Vega told Chile's Radio Cooperativa on Friday.
The Health Ministry said it ordered a complete quarantine Friday and alerted the U.N.'s World Health Organization. The U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization, meanwhile was working closely with Chilean government scientists, said Dr. Juan Lubroth, the head of infectious diseases for FAO in Rome.
Chile is sending some samples outside the country for more genetic sequencing to confirm that it matches the pandemic strain, Lubroth said. "As a scientist, I want to touch, smell, feel, taste it" before agreeing that it's a match, he said.
There are some encouraging signs that this particular outbreak remains mild. Egg production and water consumption among the birds dropped—prompting the company to take action—but the birds aren't terribly sick, let alone dying in large numbers, Lubroth said.
"My understanding is that with the ones that were sick, it was a very mild disease," Lubroth said. "It's significant in that we don't need to recommend any drastic measures, as far as culling the population of turkeys. Let them go through their illness and recover—seven to 10 days—and if they are sound and healthy, they could enter the food chain."
Sopraval veterinarian Andrea Campos said that won't happen because the outbreak has been limited to birds raised to lay eggs, not those being fattened for meat.
"In all of the birds raised to be fattened to produce meat, we have not found any illness. This is an illness entirely limited within a reproductive group," Campos said.
Lubroth praised the company and the Chilean ministries for the actions they've taken.
"If it were highly virulent then we would recommend stronger measures," Lubroth added.
Chile, meanwhile, is acting to contain the outbreak by limiting the turkeys' contact with people and wildlife, Lubroth said. But given the mildness of this particular outbreak, he said, "I don't see that there is going to be a large risk from what we know today of this type of transmission occurring."
U.S. health officials said they remain wary of the possibility that swine flu will mutate by mixing with bird flu or other forms of influenza. But they haven't received any reports of a dangerous mutation yet, and the fact that the virus can spread to turkeys was not all that surprising, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaking at a Friday news conference in Atlanta, Georgia.
The Chilean report "did not raise any great concerns among us," Fauci said.
The virus has infected at least 12,000 people and killed 128 in Chile. Throughout the Americas, as of Aug. 14, 105,882 confirmed cases have been reported from all 35 countries, including 1,579 deaths in 22 countries.
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Old 08-21-2009, 03:01 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from... http://wcbstv.com/health/h1n1.swine.flu.2.1142469.html


Report: H1N1 'Poses Serious Threat' To Nation

White House Report Says Virus Likely To Infect More People Than Usual, Doctors' Offices & Hospitals Could Be 'Filled To Capacity'

NEW YORK (CBS) ―



With schools set to open again in coming weeks and flu season just around the corner, the White House released the findings of a new report Monday on the H1N1 virus, saying the current strain "poses a serious health threat to the nation."

According to the report, officials don't believe the strain will turn into a deadly flu pandemic similar to the one in 1918-19, but that it could infect more people than usual because many people are not immune to it. It estimated that 1.8 million people could be hospitalized from the infection.

"This could mean that doctors' offices and hospitals may get filled to capacity," the report says.

Though it's impossible to predict how many people will be infected this winter, the report says it's "plausible" that 30 to 50 percent of the American population could have the virus, which could cause between 30,000 and 90,000 deaths.

If these numbers hold true, the report says anywhere from 50 to 100 percent of beds in intensive care units in hospitals could be filled with patients.

"As the nation prepares for what could be a challenging fall, it is crucial that our public health decisions are informed by the very best scientific and technological information," said John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and a co-chair of PCAST.

Click here to read the entire report.

As the government takes steps to counter a delay in the arrival of swine flu vaccines, schools in our area are making sure they're prepared.

The West New York school district and many other districts in the tri-state area are preparing for a swine flu outbreak. The high school has sick rooms and they're making sure students know how the prevent this virus from spreading.

"We are constantly teaching, especially in the elementary school level the teachers are now, it's part of their plan to teach hand cleanliness," said John Fauta, assistant superintendent.

Fauta said they're speeding up normal everyday clean ups at schools and making sure they have more than enough hand sanitizers.

The swine flu outbreak started in a parochial school in Queens last spring. Before it was over, close to a million people got sick around the nation, and 47 people died from it.

Many schools quickly shut down when a case was confirmed.

On Long Island Tuesday, Suffolk County officials met at a flu summit to discuss measure in the event of an outbreak.

"A seasonal flu vaccine should be ready by the end of August, early September, and everyone in the public can go ahead and get that. And shortly thereafter, a month and a half or so, we will begin to have doses for the H1N1 vaccine," said Dr. Michelle Davis, deputy regional director of the Health and Human Services Department.

As for vaccines, health officials had predicted they would have 120 million vaccines on hand, but now expects just 45 million.
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Old 08-24-2009, 05:09 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from... http://www.koat.com/news/20537940/detail.html


Flu-Like Symptoms Appear At Two Schools

Los Alamos, Kirtland Report Flu-Like Cases In Students

POSTED: 5:12 pm MDT August 24, 2009
UPDATED: 11:27 pm MDT August 24, 2009


LOS ALAMOS, N.M. -- The Department of Health is investigating clusters of influenza-like illness in students from Los Alamos and Kirtland, near Farmington, N.M. The Department has not yet confirmed whether the illnesses are H1N1.A local health care provider reported on Aug. 21 that 20 children from Los Alamos Middle School had flu-like symptoms. A Los Alamos school nurse reported Monday that more than 100 students stayed home sick, which is about an 18 percent absentee rate among the 600 children who attend the school.Among Kirtland Early Childhood Center's kindergarten classes, a school nurse reported on Aug. 21 that 13 children had flu-like symptoms."We anticipated seeing clusters of flu illness when school began because H1N1 influenza activity has continued throughout the summer," New Mexico Health Secretary Dr. Alfredo Vigil said. "We are making sure schools are prepared to respond appropriately to ill students and staff, and we encourage parents to keep their children at home if they are sick with a fever, cough and/or a sore throat.""Superintendents and school principals have been receiving the latest information on H1N1 virus and prevention strategies," said Education Secretary Veronica C. Garcia. "School closures will be based on a collaborative decision made by me, Secretary Vigil, and the superintendent of the school district. I encourage all educators to follow prevention steps outlined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Department of Health."So far, there have been 26 hospitalizations and one death due to H1N1 in New Mexico. A 45-year-old woman in Sierra County who had a medical condition that put her at high risk for flu complications died earlier this month.
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:31 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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So curdledvomit... let me ask your opinion on swine flu.

* Do you think it could really be a terrible pandemic?
* Will there really be millions of cases in the US?
* Is the vaccine safe to take?


You've obviously read more than I have about it.

I have a bunch of wingnut buddies who are screaming that the swine flu "scare" is just media propaganda to get people to take the vaccine, which is actually deadly and will kill hundreds of millions of people. They think that governments are planning on killing millions of their own citizens via the vaccine.





Ideally I would get the vaccine to prove them wrong, then they would get swine flu to prove me right. I get a flu shot every year so it's no big deal for me to get one more.
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Old 08-30-2009, 01:58 PM :ninja: is offline  
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This issue seems to be accelerating to a point where a massive takeover could be staged.

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/cdc...tine-docs-leak
Old 09-02-2009, 10:25 AM captain_barkey is offline  
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Old 09-02-2009, 11:48 AM TheMorlock is offline  
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At this point, there probably have been about 600 cases in the last 3 or so weeks since school started here at Cornell University. Once death so far. Most cases are relatively mild though. Lets hope the virus doesn't become more virulent.
Old 09-12-2009, 11:36 PM Whitebread is offline  
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Lets just hope it doesn't mutate too much
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Old 09-13-2009, 07:48 AM tegandje is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andje View Post
Lets just hope it doesn't mutate too much

Viruses like this usually mutate quickly.


Hopefully it ends up like the Spanish Flu where the virus mutates to become less deadly. Afterall, you can't spread as fast when you kill your host rapidly Viruses aren't too smart.
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Old 09-13-2009, 01:06 PM :ninja: is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :ninja: View Post
Viruses like this usually mutate quickly.


Hopefully it ends up like the Spanish Flu where the virus mutates to become less deadly. Afterall, you can't spread as fast when you kill your host rapidly Viruses aren't too smart.

And if it mutates too quickly, Madagascar will shut down its airports....game over
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Old 09-13-2009, 04:40 PM TommyTheCat is offline  
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This swine flu is going to be a pain in my ass. We are almost done validating our new swine flu assay in the molecular lab I work in. Last season was terrible cuz everyday we had up to 40 samples a day to run and the assay we used took all dam day to do. This season could be worse but the good thing is our new method only takes 2.5hrs.

Because we are one of the only labs in the state to have a swine flu assay we expect to work looong hours and be push to the limit.
Old 09-13-2009, 05:38 PM Mr. Marbles is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :ninja: View Post
So curdledvomit... let me ask your opinion on swine flu.

* Do you think it could really be a terrible pandemic?
* Will there really be millions of cases in the US?
* Is the vaccine safe to take?


You've obviously read more than I have about it.

I have a bunch of wingnut buddies who are screaming that the swine flu "scare" is just media propaganda to get people to take the vaccine, which is actually deadly and will kill hundreds of millions of people. They think that governments are planning on killing millions of their own citizens via the vaccine.





Ideally I would get the vaccine to prove them wrong, then they would get swine flu to prove me right. I get a flu shot every year so it's no big deal for me to get one more.

yes it is already a pandemic.

there will be millions of cases in the US

I don't know for sure about the vaccine but I think it has been rushed along. There are cases of fatalities and a brain disorder. Does that mean it is not safe? Depends on how many doses were given and how many bad reactions happened. I for one can not take it since I already have a suppressed immune system but if I had the choice I would not take it.

I do have two children and I am sure I will have to make a decision on them getting it or not, My first thought is hell no but then again what if they do get it and die...not something I would want to have to live with. But the fact remains that most cases resolve themselves with normal treatment. If I had to make the decision right now I would say no. Time will tell.
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Old 09-13-2009, 08:27 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this drom... http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...d=aA5k7CsfjJ2o


Swine Flu Mystery in Healthy Spurs Search for a Cause (Update2)

Sept. 14 (Bloomberg) -- After being infected with swine flu, Brent Robb, a 34-year-old New Zealander with no pre-existing medical conditions, spent 11 days in a coma induced by doctors in a last-ditch effort to save his life.
A printer who liked to bike 12 miles a week for exercise, Robb lost two months of work while sick, and a sixth of his body weight. He survives as an example of a mystery hovering over the fast-moving pandemic that has spread to 177 countries in four months, yet causes little more than a fever and a cough in all but a select few.
Seasonal flu kills predominantly the frail elderly. Researchers are trying to determine why the H1N1 swine flu virus, much like the Spanish Flu of 1918, is lethal to a portion of young people in good health. The reason may involve a person’s genetics, or simply taking a deep breath just as a nearby infected person sneezes.
“That’s a question we have to find the answer to,” said Nikki Shindo, a Geneva-based doctor leading the World Health Organization’s investigation of swine flu patients.
Underlying conditions that can intensify the effects of flu include respiratory illnesses, especially asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, a suppressed immune system, and even pregnancy. About 25 percent to 50 percent of severe cases worldwide involve healthy young and middle-aged people like Robb, according to WHO Director-General Margaret Chan.
Unpredictable Disease
It is a statistic that highlights how unpredictable the disease has turned out to be, said Ian Barr, deputy director of the WHO’s Collaborating Center for Influenza in Melbourne.
“People are happy to dismiss serious cases among people with underlying conditions,” Barr said in an interview. “It’s a wake-up call when healthy people are struck down.”
As many as 2 billion people, or 30 percent of the world’s population, may become infected by the new virus as it spreads globally, according to the WHO. Identifying those likely to recover without medical help and those who may become severely ill will help prioritize vaccination and drug treatment.
In Australia, the median age of people dying from seasonal flu is 83. With the H1N1 swine flu, it is 54 years, according to the government’s Aug. 28 influenza surveillance summary report. In New South Wales, Australia’s most-populous state, the majority of H1N1 patients in intensive-care units are 30 to 59 years old, the state government’s Sept. 9 weekly report notes.
Spanish Flu
A similar trend has been observed worldwide since the pandemic was discovered in April in Mexico. There, 70 percent of fatal cases were of people ages 20 to 59 years, Guillermo Ruiz- Palacios, head of infectious diseases at the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition in Mexico City, told global health experts today at the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in San Francisco.
Increased incidence of severe disease in young adults is “distinctly unusual for seasonal influenza” and a pattern not seen so markedly since the 1918 Spanish Flu, said Jonathan McCullers, an infectious diseases doctor at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis.
“That was one of the hallmarks of that pandemic,” McCullers said today at the conference. “Young adults were really the hardest hit group.”
McCullers said a study beginning in November will analyze whether bacteria worsen the effects of flu.
Genetic Cause
Scientists at the San Francisco conference, the world’s biggest meeting of infectious disease specialists, are set to report on a study that sifted through blood test results from dozens of patients with complications in search of a common genetic cause.
Bad luck may also play a role, WHO’s Shindo said. Taking a deep breath or yawning immediately after an infected person nearby coughs or sneezes may enable large amounts of airborne viral particles to penetrate the lower lung, she said.
“There have got to be some host factors that are involved in terms of explaining why there are these rare, lethal pneumonias and why some folks don’t handle the virus at all well and the vast majority have an uncomplicated illness,” said Frederick Hayden, professor of clinical virology at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville.
Doctors haven’t been able to explain why Robb almost died while his partner, Susanna Gillies, and their 5-year-old son both escaped uninfected, Gillies said in an interview.
‘Couldn’t Shake It’
Robb’s illness began like most flu cases. Forty-eight hours after returning from a daylong business trip to Melbourne on July 9, he was laid up in bed.
“I just thought it was the flu, but I couldn’t shake it,” he said over the telephone from his home on the outskirts of Christchurch, New Zealand’s third-biggest urban area. “I started getting run-down, then came the body shivers and sweats, and I felt very tired with a major, major headache.”
Robb’s cough became so persistent on the evening of the fifth day of his illness that he moved to the sofa to avoid disturbing Gillies, he said. Having not eaten in days, he was pale, feverish and too weak to sit up, and panting rapidly, recalled Gillies, a 36-year-old bookkeeper.
“I just wasn’t able to take deep breaths,” Robb said.
His condition worsened the next day, said Gillies, who called New Zealand’s Healthline, a free 24-hour telephone medical advice service. “Twice they said they didn’t want to see him. There was nothing they could do for the cough. Just keep the fluids up,” she said.
Just before 5 p.m., when shops in Christchurch were preparing to close, Gillies called the hotline a third time.
Last Chance
“I thought this was my last chance to get something for him before the weekend,” she said. “Luckily they asked me more about his symptoms and said I should bring him in.”
Robb arrived at the clinic an hour later struggling to breathe with a temperature of more than 39 degrees Celsius (102 Fahrenheit), Gillies said.
“They thought he had pneumonia and told us to go straight to the accident and emergency department,” Gillies said.
Robb’s blood oxygen saturation was 58 percent, indicating his body was so dangerously starved of air that its tissues were being damaged.
He was taken that evening to intensive care, where he was sedated so a tube could be inserted into his airway for mechanical ventilation, and he was given Roche Holding AG’s antiviral drug Tamiflu, antibiotics and painkillers, Gillies said.
Back to Health
A week later, the breathing tube was inserted directly into Robb’s windpipe to avoid it damaging his vocal cords and to enable him to be brought out of the coma. Days later he was moved back to the wards and discharged on July 31. In less than three weeks, he had shed 13 kilograms (29 pounds) from his stocky, 75-kilo, 1.62-meter- (5’4”) tall frame.
In New Zealand, about one in seven people hospitalized with H1N1 have needed intensive-care treatment, the Ministry of Health said in a Sept. 11 statement.
In most cases, flu remains in the nose, throat and bronchi, where it causes a runny nose, sore throat and cough until the body’s immune systems eliminates it, usually within a week.
The pandemic strain is more adept than seasonal flu at infiltrating the lower branches of the airway, where it can cause complications such as those that occurred in Robb’s case, including viral pneumonia, said Stephen Toovey, a senior research fellow at London’s Royal Free and University College Medical School.
Viral Pneumonia
While the pandemic virus tightly latches onto cells in the upper respiratory tract like seasonal virus, it also attacks cells in the lungs, researchers at London’s Imperial College wrote in a study reported Sept. 10 in the journal Nature Biotechnology.
In severe cases, influenza can damage the capillaries surrounding the tiny grape-like sacs, known as alveoli, where gas is exchanged through the blood. Damaged alveoli can bleed, causing pulmonary hemorrhage and blood clots.
“What makes it go from the bronchus to the alveoli is the $64,000 question,” said John Nicholls, associate professor of pathology at the University of Hong Kong, who has studied how cells interact with viruses like the H5N1 bird flu strain and SARS. Previous bouts of flu, particularly caused by strains similar to the H1N1 virus, may give some protection, he said.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating the mechanisms for severe disease, Nancy Cox, director of the Atlanta-based agency’s flu division, told the meeting in San Francisco today.
“When the virus gets into the lower respiratory, it appears to replicate extremely well,” Cox said. “It’s really puzzling.”
Inflammatory chemicals are produced by the immune system to fight the infection and repair the damage. An over-exuberant response can worsen the effect by filling the lungs with fluid and cause permanent scarring that restricts the lungs.
“Pathologically, it’s identical to what happens with H5N1 infection,” known commonly as bird flu, said Shindo, the WHO doctor. “Pathologists say if they weren’t told it was H1N1 they would diagnose H5N1 as the cause.”
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Old 09-13-2009, 08:39 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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Old 09-14-2009, 05:38 AM Straw Man is offline  
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this from... http://in.reuters.com/article/health...59J55H20091020


H1N1 flu strain found in Canadian turkey flock


WINNIPEG, Manitoba (Reuters) - Turkeys in the Canadian province of Ontario have become infected with the H1N1 flu virus, but no birds or eggs from the farm entered the food supply, provincial government officials said on Tuesday.
The infection poses minimal risk to human health, Dr. Arlene King, Ontario's chief medical officer of health, said in a news conference in Toronto.
However, she noted the discovery highlights the need for those who work with farm animals to be vaccinated for both seasonal flu and the pandemic H1N1 flu strain.
The risk of the virus passing between people and animals is that the virus could evolve into a form against which humans have little or no immunity, King said. There is no evidence that the virus has changed, she added.
The discovery in a single Ontario barn by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency is the second known incident of turkeys becoming infected with the H1N1 virus, also called swine flu. The first was in a flock in Chile.
The Ontario case comes just over a week after the Canadian Thanksgiving holiday, which traditionally involves a turkey dinner.
Health officials are following up with people who had contact with the infected turkeys. One person with contact had shown flu-like symptoms.
The turkeys' owner has voluntarily agreed to quarantine the infected birds, but they aren't likely to be prematurely slaughtered, said Dr. Deb Stark, Ontario's chief veterinarian.
The outbreak of H1N1 flu among turkeys in Chile was discovered in August. It was also the first case of the virus being found outside humans and pigs. Earlier this year the strain was found in hog herds in the Western Canadian provinces of Alberta and Manitoba.
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