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Old 03-05-2012, 09:51 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 03-05-2012, 09:52 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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edplayer
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Originally Posted by TheMorlock View Post
do you really not know the basics how disease works?



I don't. But I have full confidence in the genmay explanation of it. Preferably with bullet points.
Old 03-05-2012, 11:41 PM edplayer is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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this from... http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2012...esia-bird-flu/

Bird flu kills teen in eastern Indonesia

The Associated Press

Monday, March 26, 2012 | 9:14 p.m.

A 17-year-old has died of bird flu in Indonesia. He is the country's sixth fatality from the virus so far this year.

Health ministry spokeswoman Murti Utami said Tuesday the boy from eastern Lombok island developed symptoms early this month after coming into contact with sick chickens.

He died March 9 after one week's hospitalization.

Utami says laboratory results came back several days ago confirming he had the deadly H5N1 virus.

Bird flu began ravaging poultry in 2003 and has killed 352 people worldwide. It is still present in some areas of Asia and the Middle East. Indonesia has been the hardest-hit country, accounting for 156 of the deaths.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 03-26-2012, 09:58 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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Why contain it? Let it spill over into the schools and churches, let the bodies pile up in the streets. In the end, they'll beg us to save them.
Old 03-26-2012, 10:20 PM aoeoae is offline  
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BlisterDick
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just had a cytokine storm in my balls... they turned to soup
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Old 03-26-2012, 10:50 PM BlisterDick is offline  
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just had a cytokine storm in my balls... they turned to soup

I am sure it was hormones. It is hard to distinguish them from each other.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 04-02-2012, 12:05 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from http://ca.news.yahoo.com/china-reports-bird-flu-outbreak-142706642.html

China reports bird flu outbreak



Agricultural authorities in northwest China have culled about 95,000 chickens after an outbreak of the H5N1 bird flu virus, state press reported Wednesday.
The outbreak in Touying township of the Ningxia region was discovered on Friday last week after over 23,000 chickens began showing symptoms, Xinhua news agency said, citing the Ministry of Agriculture.
The ministry said the "epidemic is now under control", the report said, while work teams have been sent to the area to step up prevention measures.
China is considered one of the nations most at risk of bird flu epidemics because it has the world's biggest poultry population and many chickens in rural areas are kept close to humans.
In January, a man in southwest China's Guizhou province died after contracting the bird flu virus, the second such fatality reported in China this year, health authorities said.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 04-19-2012, 08:27 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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This will not end well...

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/flu-study-s...181406912.html

Scientists who created a mutant virus to explore a key aspect of influenza published their research Wednesday after a four-month storm that brewed fears of bioterrorism and accusations of censorship.

The controversy began in December when teams in the United States and the Netherlands separately said they had engineered a hybrid virus in high-security labs.

Their goal was to understand how a highly lethal strain of flu which spreads among birds but is hard to transmit to mammals could mutate into a variant that is contagious among humans.

A 23-member expert panel that advises the US government called for manuscript changes before the work could be published in a journal, the traditional arena for displaying and discussing scientific work.

It feared that full disclosure could help a rogue state or bioterror group make a virus against which no-one would be immune.

But some scientists lashed the recommendation, saying it was an attempt to censor or stifle scientific discourse.

Two journals put the papers on hold while they consulted the researchers and the panel, the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB).

On Wednesday, the British journal Nature finally published one of the studies, conducted by a team led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka at the University of Wisconsin.

"The essential scientific elements (in the original manuscript) were unchanged," the journal said, adding it was publishing the paper after receiving "several independent pieces of biosecurity advice".

Kawaoka's team delved into the H5N1 strain of avian flu, which caused a health scare in Hong Kong in 1997 and still surfaces sporadically today.

H5N1 spreads easily among poultry and wild birds but is hard to transmit to humans. When it does, it is brutal, killing more than one infected person in two.

The team took a key gene, known as haemagluttinin or HA, from the H5N1 virus and added a mutation that made it more compatible with human respiratory cells.

They then took a strain of H1N1 flu -- the virus that caused a pandemic among humans in 2009 but proved to be no more lethal than ordinary seasonal flu -- and replaced its HA gene with the engineered one.

The next step was to test the "H5/H1 hybrid" on six ferrets, a mammal deemed an excellent model for testing flu because its respiratory system is so similar to that of humans.

The infected ferrets passed on the virus to others in respiratory droplets, thus proving that the new virus could be spread through coughs and sneezes.

But none of the animals died, something that remains to be explained, said the researchers.

The findings shed light on the genetic borrowings that help a virus gain in contagiousness, they said. This risk is all too present in nature, especially in pigs, which can mix avian, human and porcine viruses.

The work will help alert health watchdogs to emerging viral threats and provide vaccine engineers with potential targets, they argued.

Nature showed journalists a report from "a bio-defence agency outside the US", which it declined to name, that said the benefits of publication outweighed the risks.

"This information could be used by an aggressor and shows one of the building blocks for the development of a potential BW [biowarfare] weapon," the report said.

"[Such skill] is a demanding capability, probably beyond the capacity of the majority of those groupings of concern," it said.

"On the other hand, not publishing this information would slow, or even block, the development of a vaccine against a virus that still has the potential to mutate naturally to a pandemic form, which could cause huge numbers of fatalities worldwide."

Touching on the tension between freedom of expression and scientific responsibility, Nature said it was "desirable" to have a forum such as NSABB but in this case the panel had over-reacted.

"There are justified concerns among the research community about the NSABB's processes, and these processes should be reviewed."

The other paper, intended for the US journal Science, is written by Ron Fouchier of the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which publishes the journal, said Fouchier's study was undergoing peer review -- the traditional scrutiny in scientific publications.

"We had originally hoped, as a public service, to be able to publish Dr. Fouchier's paper simultaneously with the similar research by Dr. Kawaoka. But appropriate review and editing of the manuscript is the primary goal," said AAAS spokeswoman Ginger Pinholster.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 05-02-2012, 08:06 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from... http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/0...-flu-pandemic/


Some bird flu strains only three mutations away from a pandemic, researchers find

A new study raises concerns that it may be possible for airborne transmissible, human-to-human avian H5N1 flu viruses to evolve in nature.

The study looked at five mutations identified previously in the controversial bird flu studies published in the journals Nature and Science—led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin and Ron Fouchier of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, respectively—which would make it possible for bird flu to spread from human to human.

In those studies, the researchers experimented with bird flu strains to show which mutations would be necessary for the virus to evolve to become transmissible between mammals.

The papers revealed with only five mutations (amino acid substitutions), or four mutations plus reassortment, bird flu can become transmissible between mammals – and potentially humans. Currently, bird flu can be transmitted from birds to humans, but not from humans to humans.

U.S. federal officials initially asked the journals to withhold publishing the papers, based on bioterrorism fears, but relented after an independent panel of experts determined there was no threat to public health.

Now, in an accompanying study, led by Professor Derek Smith and Dr. Colin Russell at the University of Cambridge, researchers analyzed all the surveillance data available on avian H5N1 flu viruses in the past 15 years and discovered two of the five mutations needed to make bird flu transmissible between mammals had already occurred in numerous avian flu strains that exist in nature.

Not only that, but a number of the virus strains had both of the mutations, the researchers added.

"Viruses that have two of these mutations are already common in birds, meaning that there are viruses that might have to acquire only three additional mutations in a human to become airborne transmissible,” Russell said in a released statement. “The next key question is, 'Is three a lot, or a little?'"

In order to address the question, the researchers used a mathematical model of how viruses replicate and evolve in mammals to see which factors would increase the likelihood of the three mutations occurring spontaneously in nature.

According to the model, factors that increased the likelihood of the virus evolving included random mutations and positive selection. Viruses can replicate billions of times within a single host, sometimes imperfectly, leading to random mutations. Positive selection may favor some of these mutations if they help the virus adapt to mammals and spread.

A long period of infection can also increase the likelihood of the virus evolving, because the longer a person is infected, the more the virus replicates and mutations can accumulate. According to the researchers, it is also likely that there are other mutations not identified by the Foucheir and Kawaoka papers, which can act as functional substitutes for the three remaining mutations.

Finally, the diversity of the virus within the bird population can spell trouble for humans as well. The more mutations there are within the bird population, the higher probability there is that a key mutation may be missed by routine surveillance.

However, even after identifying those factors, as well as a few factors that may actually decrease the likelihood of bird flu evolving, the researchers said it was impossible to determine the exact risk.

“You can’t put a number on it,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease at the National Institutes of Health, told FoxNews.com. “ But nature has already told us this is very unlikely—not impossible, but unlikely.”

According to Fauci, health officials first noticed the bird flu virus in 1997 and started following it closely since 2003.

“In nine years, there have been 600 cases in that period, and the virus has not naturally mutated to get to the point where investigators got it in [the papers by Kawaoka and Fouchier],” Fauci said. “…But some of the mutations induced experimentally are to a certain extent occurring naturally in the wild, so the bottom line is, it is feasible.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture continually does surveillance on chickens for traces of H5N1, while the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention periodically samples influenza strains in people, according to Fauci—who added that no potential pandemics have been observed as intensively as this one in the past. So far, there have been no reported cases in the U.S. of H5N1 in humans.

The Cambridge researchers recommended continued surveillance of the bird flu virus, particularly in regions where mutations necessary for human transmission have occurred, as well as in regions connected to those by bird migration and trade. They also called for additional studies and deep sequencing of bird flu viruses to identify any other mutations that may play a role in human-to-human transmission.

In a statement, Smith compared the situation to assessing the risk of an earthquake or tsunami. “We don't know exactly when and where, but by increasing monitoring and research – some of which is already underway – scientists and public health officials will be able to increase the accuracy with which the risk can be assessed and to minimize those risks."

Fauci added: “If in fact the mutations can happen, you want to get an idea of what the virus would look like in order to have better surveillance, determine its sensitivity to current drugs and see if the vaccine still protects against it."

The study will be published in the journal Science.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/0...#ixzz1yTtFeWHb
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 06-21-2012, 06:24 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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Old 06-21-2012, 06:29 PM Jack's raging erection is offline  
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#1271  

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i thought of curdled_vomit's apocalypse theory today...i joined the surveillance and epidemiology response unit at work, which is an emergency system that gets activated in case of epidemic/disaster. my intro to the program was the handbook on bird flu
Old 06-21-2012, 07:14 PM Vendetta is offline  
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i thought of curdled_vomit's apocalypse theory today...i joined the surveillance and epidemiology response unit at work, which is an emergency system that gets activated in case of epidemic/disaster. my intro to the program was the handbook on bird flu
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Old 06-21-2012, 07:34 PM tegandje is offline  
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i thought of curdled_vomit's apocalypse theory today...i joined the surveillance and epidemiology response unit at work, which is an emergency system that gets activated in case of epidemic/disaster. my intro to the program was the handbook on bird flu

woot!

this from... http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...8611C220120702

Bird flu outbreak hits chicken farms in Mexico

(Reuters) - An outbreak of avian flu in western Mexico has killed at least 870,000 poultry birds since its detection last month but poses no threat to humans, the agriculture ministry said on Monday.
The H7N3 flu was detected in two municipalities in the state of Jalisco, Mexico's largest chicken farming region, and authorities have been working quickly to contain the outbreak, a statement from the ministry said.
"There is no risk of infection (in humans) as a result of consuming poultry," said Jose OMGOMGOMGOMGOMG from the Jalisco state government.
It was not clear how many of the 870,000 birds - just a small fraction of the national flock - had contracted the flu and how many had been culled by farmers to contain its spread, an agriculture ministry official said.
Mexican health inspectors had examined nearly 150 poultry farms in Jalisco by Friday and detected the virus in 10.
"The virus has never been out of control. It is localized in two places in Jalisco and up until now there is no evidence that it is anywhere else," the official said, asking not be named.
As a cautionary measure, authorities declared a national animal health emergency on Monday to help prevent the disease's spread to other parts of Mexico or farther. The ministry has ordered vaccinations from Asia and is also developing their own drugs domestically to combat the flu.
The western state of Jalisco produces around 11 percent of the country's poultry meat and 50 percent of its eggs, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
Mexico produces around 3 million metric tonnes (3.3 million tons) of poultry each year but consumes most of that locally, said Sergio Chavez from the national union of poultry farmers.
The country also imports some chicken parts from the United States. The USDA forecasts 2012 imports at around 630,000 metric tonnes.
Health officials are on high alert for new viruses in Mexico since the 2009 outbreak of H1N1 virus, known as 'swine flu' that shut down the capital city for several days when it was detected in humans.
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 07-02-2012, 04:11 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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#1274  

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Quote:
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but poses no threat to humans

oh.
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Old 07-02-2012, 04:17 PM Xcric is offline  
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