General [M]ayhem

Go Back   General [M]ayhem > Real Time Sub-Forums > Armageddon and Survival
Register Members List Mark Forums Read [M]erchandise Calendar

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Bill
 
Bill's Avatar
 
Cleaning an unmaintained utility knife?

I've got an older gerber folding blade knife thats basically been sitting in a garage for five or so years. I'm looking to try to clean it up and get it back in decent shape. Its got cobwebs and lint and crap all over it. I tried googling it and found some retard fanatisist HOLY SHIT COMPRESSED CAN AIR IS BAD IT HAS WATER DROPLETS IN IT ( ) etc.

ANYWAY.

Its a folding blade into a black handle. Locking mechanism on the back side.

How should I clean it? I was thinking copious denatured alcohol, paper towels, cuetips, and then some WD-40 on the mechanisms, followed by a wipedown? I'm not sure the best process. I'm not sure if WD40 is appropriate with the handle material and stuff. I'd prefer to use stuff I have, I'm not terribly interested in dropping cash if its avoidable.

Also, sharpening, same deal as a kitchen knife (manual) or am I ing myself?

Any other tips would be appreciated. Thanks
__________________
Bill
Old 05-18-2008, 07:56 PM Bill is offline  
Reply With Quote
#1  

Advertisement [Remove Advertisement]

Barstool
 
Clean it in hot water and dish soap (using a soft cloth).
Use canned air to blow out water left behind.
Lube the joints with a good quality gun oil. I just use Rem Oil since it's cheap.
Be sure to keep the blade lightly oiled (to prevent rusting) if it's going to be stored for a while.
Old 05-19-2008, 07:41 AM Barstool is offline  
Reply With Quote
#2  

Klypr
Pittsburgh Poz
 
Klypr's Avatar
 
I would use compressed air to blow out any solid debris. Then if it has no plastic or wood parts, clean it real well with soap and water.

WD-40 was originally designed as a metal cleaner so use that on the joints. Again, avoid the plastic and wood areas. It obviously has the added benefit of lubricating all metal on metal contacts.

After is all shiny use a whet stone and give it it's edge back. Avoid any "kitchen sharpening devices". They usually tend to destroy your blade instead of sharpening it. If it's really dull or has heavy pits in it I would suggest having it professionally sharpened. It'll be worth the small price you'll have to pay.
Old 05-20-2008, 07:38 AM Klypr is offline  
Reply With Quote
#3  

Bill
 
Bill's Avatar
 
From the gerber site it would appear to be a "glass filed nylon" handle or some crap like that. Does that count as plastic?

Thanks guys.
__________________
Bill
Old 05-20-2008, 02:28 PM Bill is offline  
Reply With Quote
#4  

Mr. Baz
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klypr View Post
I would use compressed air to blow out any solid debris. Then if it has no plastic or wood parts, clean it real well with soap and water.

WD-40 was originally designed as a metal cleaner so use that on the joints. Again, avoid the plastic and wood areas. It obviously has the added benefit of lubricating all metal on metal contacts.

WD-40 was originally designed as a water displacement solution to spray on Atlas rockets to keep off water for many reasons (ice formation, rust, etc).
It's actually not good to use as a long-term lubricant.
Use some gun oil (very little is all you need) and you'll be fine.
Old 05-21-2008, 09:57 AM Mr. Baz is offline  
Reply With Quote
#5  

stupid dumbass
IvanY
 
Wash with soap and water, blow the joints out with compressed air, shoot a bit of WD-40 in there, and put a bit of mineral oil into the joints the next day. It's likely stainless steel liners with nylon scales so you're not going to do anything to it.
__________________
<3 intarweb
Old 05-21-2008, 07:45 PM stupid dumbass is offline  
Reply With Quote
#6  

Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:38 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.