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curdledvomit
 
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this from... http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/con...indonesia.html


Daughter of Indonesian H5N1 patient infected

Feb 12, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) today reported that a 15-year-old girl from Indonesia is hospitalized in critical condition with an H5N1 avian influenza infection, a week after her mother's H5N1 illness was announced.
The girl, who is from West Jakarta, got sick on Feb 2 and was hospitalized 6 days later, according to a statement from the WHO. She is listed as Indonesia's 127th case-patient.
An investigation into the girl's illness is ongoing, though the WHO said she was exposed to her sick mother on Jan 27 and 28 and also spent time in a neighborhood where chickens and other birds were present. The WHO said samples from the birds have been taken to determine if they were the source of the girl's infection.
The girl's mother fell ill on Jan 23 and was hospitalized 3 days later. The WHO's Feb 5 statement on the woman, who is listed as Indonesia's 126th case-patient, said she was in critical condition. The report gave no details about the source of her infection.
Indonesia's last known family cluster of H5N1 cases was reported in January 2007, when an 18-year-old boy's H5N1 illness was confirmed after his mother died of the disease. The mother was from Tangerang, a suburb of Jakarta. The son's place of residence was not listed, but a Jan 15, 2007, WHO statement on his illness said the son and his mother probably had the same environmental exposure to the virus.
With the latest case, the WHO's global H5N1 count has reached 360 cases with 226 deaths.
See also:
Feb 12 WHO statement
WHO's global H5N1 case count
Feb 5 CIDRAP News story "WHO: H5N1 strikes two more Indonesians"
Jan 16, 2007, CIDRAP News story "H5N1 hit Indonesian mother, son, but not father"
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Old 02-12-2008, 06:05 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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I don't think so.

this from... http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/con...1208birds.html


H5N1 strikes birds in Laos

Feb 12, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Agriculture officials in Laos have reported an H5N1 avian influenza outbreak in poultry in a northwestern province, the country's first outbreak in about a year.
A Lao newspaper reported today that the outbreak hit birds in Louang Namtha province, according to Xinhua, China's state news agency. About 600 poultry in Nam Ma village died last week, and samples from the birds were positive for H5N1, Bounkhouang Khambounheuang, head of the livestock and fisheries department, told the Lao media.
The department banned the movement and sale of poultry and eggs in the village, sprayed flocks with disinfectants, and said it would cull poultry within a 1-kilometer radius of the village, Xinhua reported.
The last H5N1 outbreaks in Laos were reported about a year ago, when the virus struck birds in and around the capital, Vientiane, as well as in Savannakhet and Champasak provinces, according to reports from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).
Elsewhere, agriculture officials in Bangladesh reported that H5N1 outbreaks have struck 40 of the country's 64 districts, according to Feb 10 report from Reuters. Workers culled 12,000 more bids after chickens in the northeastern part of the country died of the virus, the report said.
Bangladesh has culled 560,000 birds on 228 farms since H5N1 first surfaced in the country in March 2007, The Independent, one of the country's English language newspapers, reported today, according to Xinhua.
Livestock minister Maniklal Samaddar has said 823 people have been tested and found to be free of the H5N1 virus, Xinhua reported. He said the government is trying to raise the public's awareness about the virus by sending letters to local government leaders, teachers, and imams of mosques.
Me neither.
Old 02-13-2008, 07:06 AM Whitebread is offline  
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this from... http://www.reuters.com/article/europ.../idUSDHA160223


Bird flu strikes another Bangladesh district


Wed Feb 13, 2008 8:03am EST


DHAKA, Feb 13 (Reuters) - Bird flu has spread to another district in Bangladesh despite efforts by authorities to control it, officials said on Wednesday, bringing the number of affected districts to 41 out of 64.

Health workers culled nearly 1,100 fowl after tests confirmed some chickens had died from the avian influenza virus in western Meherpur, livestock officials said.

The H5N1 virus, first detected in Bangladesh in March last year, was quickly brought under control through aggressive measures, including culling. But it reappeared few months ago apparently because of lax follow-up monitoring, experts say.

So far no human infections have been reported in Bangladesh, a densely populated nation with millions of backyard poultry and thousands of chicken farms.

The government has raised compensation for poultry farmers to encourage them to report and kill sick birds as part of efforts to stamp out the outbreak. Nearly 600,000 birds have been culled across the country against the virus since March 2007, but it continues to spread and now covers nearly two-thirds of the country of more than 140 million people.

Officials blame lack of awareness among poultry breeders and non-compliance with warnings by the health ministry as main reasons for the spread of the virus.

The World Health Organization fears that the H5N1 strain, which has already killed more than 220 people worldwide since 2003, could mutate or combine with the highly contagious seasonal influenza virus and spark a pandemic that could kill millions of people. (Reporting by Ruma Paul; Editing by David Fox)
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:08 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from... http://www.philstar.com/index.php?Gl...aid=2008021551


Hong Kong finds 2nd bird with flu virus; second human death in a week in Vietnam


Friday, February 15, 2008 08:10 PM


HONG KONG (AP) - Authorities said today that a wild bird found dead in Hong Kong has tested positive for the dangerous H5N1 bird flu virus strain -- the territory's second case in two days.

The dead oriental magpie robin, native to Asia, was found at a food market Sunday according to a statement from the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department.

It was Hong Kong's fourth announcement of an H5N1 case in a bird this year, and came a day after authorities said a gray heron tested positive for the virus.

Meantime, a Vietnamese man has died of bird flu, the second human case in a week, health officials said, blaming the huge consumption of poultry during the Lunar New Year holiday and recent cold spells.

The 27-year-old man died Thursday night in a Hanoi hospital. He fell ill earlier this week after eating infected chicken at his home in Ninh Binh province, some 100 kilometers (62 miles) south of Hanoi, said Nguyen Huy Nga, director of the Ministry of Health's Preventive Medicine Department.

Test results showed he was infected with the lethal H5N1 virus. This was the country's 50th death reported since the virus began raging across Asia in late 2003.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 02-15-2008, 06:01 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from... http://www.philstar.com/index.php?Gl...aid=2008021551


Hong Kong finds 2nd bird with flu virus; second human death in a week in Vietnam


Friday, February 15, 2008 08:10 PM


HONG KONG (AP) - Authorities said today that a wild bird found dead in Hong Kong has tested positive for the dangerous H5N1 bird flu virus strain -- the territory's second case in two days.

The dead oriental magpie robin, native to Asia, was found at a food market Sunday according to a statement from the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department.

It was Hong Kong's fourth announcement of an H5N1 case in a bird this year, and came a day after authorities said a gray heron tested positive for the virus.

Meantime, a Vietnamese man has died of bird flu, the second human case in a week, health officials said, blaming the huge consumption of poultry during the Lunar New Year holiday and recent cold spells.

The 27-year-old man died Thursday night in a Hanoi hospital. He fell ill earlier this week after eating infected chicken at his home in Ninh Binh province, some 100 kilometers (62 miles) south of Hanoi, said Nguyen Huy Nga, director of the Ministry of Health's Preventive Medicine Department.

Test results showed he was infected with the lethal H5N1 virus. This was the country's 50th death reported since the virus began raging across Asia in late 2003.

If its raging now, whats gonna happen when there is a full blown pandemic?
Old 02-15-2008, 03:27 PM Whitebread is offline  
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TheMorlock
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If its raging now, whats gonna happen when there is a full blown pandemic?

A pandemic today if survival rates carried over from the current variations would hit a billion in three months. This is a middle of the road estimate

And the USA would be relatively untouched. As would the non aids ravaged third world countries.. Developing countries would be hammered. Countries with large populations and government health care would be hammered.

More Oil for Me.
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http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?t=572323

Last edited by TheMorlock; 02-15-2008 at 09:42 PM..
Old 02-15-2008, 09:39 PM TheMorlock is offline  
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Whitebread
 
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A pandemic today if survival rates carried over from the current variations would hit a billion in three months. This is a middle of the road estimate

And the USA would be relatively untouched. As would the non aids ravaged third world countries.. Developing countries would be hammered. Countries with large populations and government health care would be hammered.

More Oil for Me.

USA unaffected? Maybe my scarcasm meter is malfunctioning, but the Spanish flu killed millions in the US alone. I think your underestimating the damages.
Old 02-16-2008, 10:49 AM Whitebread is offline  
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USA unaffected? Maybe my scarcasm meter is malfunctioning, but the Spanish flu killed millions in the US alone. I think your underestimating the damages.

You have heard of modern medicine? Big giant pharmacorps? I think you are underestimating the response time. We lose maybe 10 to 20 thousand. African continent is fucked prob ably lose 80% of their population. Russia wont be doing to well. Mexico is fucked with lest guess 40% population loss. Isreal wont have a palestine problem anymore. Brazil is a tossup
China is way fucked but the population loss may help them in the end.
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http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?t=572323
Old 02-16-2008, 11:49 AM TheMorlock is offline  
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Whitebread
 
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You have heard of modern medicine? Big giant pharmacorps? I think you are underestimating the response time. We lose maybe 10 to 20 thousand. African continent is fucked prob ably lose 80% of their population. Russia wont be doing to well. Mexico is fucked with lest guess 40% population loss. Isreal wont have a palestine problem anymore. Brazil is a tossup
China is way fucked but the population loss may help them in the end.

I have heard of modern medicine, and I think your really overestimating the effectiveness of our medical institutions when dealing with a country wide pandemic. I'm all for being optimistic but I think 20 thousand is a gross underestimation.
Old 02-16-2008, 02:34 PM Whitebread is offline  
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TheMorlock
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I have heard of modern medicine, and I think your really overestimating the effectiveness of our medical institutions when dealing with a country wide pandemic. I'm all for being optimistic but I think 20 thousand is a gross underestimation.

Where do you think the pandemic is going to break out?
Oh yeah where the constant crossovers are occuring. With the petri dish method of breeding virii to use in flu shots by the time it gets to the USA every phamaceutical company and the CDC and the research hospitals will be churning out vaccine for the US and her good allies.

Our only concern would be if it started in mexico.

We will lose more people in car accidents.
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http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?t=572323
Old 02-16-2008, 11:48 PM TheMorlock is offline  
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Where do you think the pandemic is going to break out?
Oh yeah where the constant crossovers are occuring. With the petri dish method of breeding virii to use in flu shots by the time it gets to the USA every phamaceutical company and the CDC and the research hospitals will be churning out vaccine for the US and her good allies.

Our only concern would be if it started in mexico.

We will lose more people in car accidents.

If they didn't start producing the vaccine until the pandemic started, then we'd all be screwed. Luckily, in the US they're experimenting with vaccines, but vaccines aren't produced anywhere nearly as quick as what you're estimating. And the real threat isn't the bird/human infection, it's the mutated human/human infection that would cause chaos.
Old 02-18-2008, 10:56 AM Badger_sly is offline  
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this from... http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5...eEbC7BwMtaUVnQ


China reports bird flu outbreak in Tibet, human death


2 hours ago
BEIJING (AFP) — Chinese authorities on Tuesday reported a fresh bird flu outbreak among poultry in Tibet, a day after confirming a 22-year-old man in central China had died of the deadly virus.
The agriculture ministry said 132 poultry had died of the H5N1 strain of bird flu in a village outside the regional capital Lhasa and about 7,700 birds had been slaughtered to bring the outbreak under control.
It was the second outbreak of bird flu in the Himalayan region this year.
In January, about 1,000 birds died and 13,000 were slaughtered during an earlier outbreak in Gongga county, which lies about 50 kilometres (30 miles) south of Lhasa.
News of the latest outbreak, posted on the agriculture ministry's website, came shortly after Chinese authorities announced the country's 18th confirmed human bird flu fatality.
The health ministry late Monday confirmed that a 22-year-old man from Hunan province had died from the H5N1 strain.
The man, surnamed Li, developed a fever and headache on January 16 and was hospitalised on January 22. But his condition worsened and he died two days later, according to a statement posted on the health ministry's website.
China's Centre for Disease Control and Prevention said he had tested positive for the H5N1 strain. The ministry did not say how he might have contracted the disease.
The local government had put in place prevention and control measures and those who had close contact with Li were put under strict medical observation. So far, none had shown signs of the disease, the ministry said.
With the latest fatality, at least 18 people have been confirmed to have died of bird flu in China. Ten other patients recovered.
China's previous fatal case was a 24-year-old man in the eastern province of Jiangsu who died in December.
H5N1 has killed more than 200 people and ravaged poultry flocks worldwide since 2003, according to the World Health Organisation.
Scientists fear the virus will eventually mutate into a form that is much more easily transmissible between humans, triggering a global pandemic.
__________________
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Old 02-19-2008, 01:01 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from... http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=59497


MIT explains spread of 1918 flu pandemic

WEBWIRE – Tuesday, February 19, 2008
MIT researchers have explained why two mutations in the H1N1 avian flu virus allowed the disease to spread during the 1918 pandemic that killed at least 50 million people. The work could help scientists detect and contain a future bird flu outbreak among humans.

The team showed that the 1918 influenza strain developed two mutations in a surface molecule called hemagglutinin (HA). This, in turn, allowed it to bind tightly to receptors in the human upper respiratory tract.

This new work could aid researchers in monitoring the HA mutations in the H5N1 avian flu strains currently circulating in Asia. Epidemiologists fear these mutations could enable the virus to jump from birds and spread between humans--a possibility that could trigger millions more deaths than the 1918 pandemic.

Ram Sasisekharan, the Underwood Prescott Professor of Biological Engineering and Health Sciences and Technology, is the senior author of a paper on the work published in the Feb. 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In January, Sasisekharan and colleagues reported in Nature Biotechnology that flu viruses can only bind to human respiratory cells if they match the shape of sugar (or glycan) receptors found on those cells.

The glycan receptors found in the human respiratory tract are known as alpha 2-6 receptors, and they come in two shapes--one resembling an open umbrella, and another resembling a cone. To infect humans, the MIT team found that avian flu viruses must gain the ability to bind to the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptor.

In the current study, the team discovered that two mutations in HA allow flu viruses to bind tightly or with high affinity to the umbrella-shaped glycan receptors.

"The affinity between the influenza virus HA and the glycan receptors appears to be a critical determinant for viral transmission" said Sasisekharan.

The researchers used the 1918 influenza virus as a model system to investigate the biochemical basis for hemagglutinin binding to glycans, which leads to viral transmission. They compared the virus that caused the 1918 pandemic (known as SC18) with a strain called NY18, which differs from SC18 by only one amino acid, and also the AV18 strain, which differs from SC18 by two amino acids.

Using ferrets (which are susceptible to human flu strains), researchers had earlier found that, while SC18 transmitted efficiently between ferrets, NY18 is only slightly infectious and AV18 not at all infectious.

These earlier findings correlate with the viruses’ ability to bind to umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 glycan receptors, demonstrated in the current PNAS study.

NY18, which is only slightly infectious, binds to the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptors, but not as well as SC18, which is highly infectious.

AV18, which does not infect humans, does not have any affinity for the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptors and binds only to alpha 2-3 receptors.

Another strain, TX18, binds to alpha 2-6 and alpha 2-3 but, because it binds with high affinity to the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptors, is much more infectious than NY18.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on the varying infectiousness of these strains last year, but the PNAS study is the first that explains the exact biochemical reason underlying these differences.

Other authors of the PNAS paper are Aravind Srinivasan and Karthik Viswanathan, postdoctoral associates in MIT’s Department of Biological Engineering (BE); Rahul Raman, research scientist in BE; Aarthi Chandrasekaran, graduate student in BE; S. Raguram, visiting scientist in BE; Viswanathan Sasisekharan, visiting scientist in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology; and Terrence Tumpey of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The research was funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART).
__________________
how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 02-19-2008, 01:11 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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TheMorlock
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badger_sly View Post
If they didn't start producing the vaccine until the pandemic started, then we'd all be screwed. Luckily, in the US they're experimenting with vaccines, but vaccines aren't produced anywhere nearly as quick as what you're estimating. And the real threat isn't the bird/human infection, it's the mutated human/human infection that would cause chaos.

actually the new process makes them in ton lots in three days

Ain't biotech grand?
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http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?t=572323
Old 02-20-2008, 12:15 AM TheMorlock is offline  
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TheMorlock
Contrary to my previous title I never fucked Inf's mother
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curdledvomit View Post
this from... http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=59497


MIT explains spread of 1918 flu pandemic

WEBWIRE – Tuesday, February 19, 2008
MIT researchers have explained why two mutations in the H1N1 avian flu virus allowed the disease to spread during the 1918 pandemic that killed at least 50 million people. The work could help scientists detect and contain a future bird flu outbreak among humans.

The team showed that the 1918 influenza strain developed two mutations in a surface molecule called hemagglutinin (HA). This, in turn, allowed it to bind tightly to receptors in the human upper respiratory tract.

This new work could aid researchers in monitoring the HA mutations in the H5N1 avian flu strains currently circulating in Asia. Epidemiologists fear these mutations could enable the virus to jump from birds and spread between humans--a possibility that could trigger millions more deaths than the 1918 pandemic.

Ram Sasisekharan, the Underwood Prescott Professor of Biological Engineering and Health Sciences and Technology, is the senior author of a paper on the work published in the Feb. 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In January, Sasisekharan and colleagues reported in Nature Biotechnology that flu viruses can only bind to human respiratory cells if they match the shape of sugar (or glycan) receptors found on those cells.

The glycan receptors found in the human respiratory tract are known as alpha 2-6 receptors, and they come in two shapes--one resembling an open umbrella, and another resembling a cone. To infect humans, the MIT team found that avian flu viruses must gain the ability to bind to the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptor.

In the current study, the team discovered that two mutations in HA allow flu viruses to bind tightly or with high affinity to the umbrella-shaped glycan receptors.

"The affinity between the influenza virus HA and the glycan receptors appears to be a critical determinant for viral transmission" said Sasisekharan.

The researchers used the 1918 influenza virus as a model system to investigate the biochemical basis for hemagglutinin binding to glycans, which leads to viral transmission. They compared the virus that caused the 1918 pandemic (known as SC18) with a strain called NY18, which differs from SC18 by only one amino acid, and also the AV18 strain, which differs from SC18 by two amino acids.

Using ferrets (which are susceptible to human flu strains), researchers had earlier found that, while SC18 transmitted efficiently between ferrets, NY18 is only slightly infectious and AV18 not at all infectious.

These earlier findings correlate with the viruses’ ability to bind to umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 glycan receptors, demonstrated in the current PNAS study.

NY18, which is only slightly infectious, binds to the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptors, but not as well as SC18, which is highly infectious.

AV18, which does not infect humans, does not have any affinity for the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptors and binds only to alpha 2-3 receptors.

Another strain, TX18, binds to alpha 2-6 and alpha 2-3 but, because it binds with high affinity to the umbrella-shaped alpha 2-6 receptors, is much more infectious than NY18.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on the varying infectiousness of these strains last year, but the PNAS study is the first that explains the exact biochemical reason underlying these differences.

Other authors of the PNAS paper are Aravind Srinivasan and Karthik Viswanathan, postdoctoral associates in MIT’s Department of Biological Engineering (BE); Rahul Raman, research scientist in BE; Aarthi Chandrasekaran, graduate student in BE; S. Raguram, visiting scientist in BE; Viswanathan Sasisekharan, visiting scientist in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology; and Terrence Tumpey of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The research was funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART).

not bad
__________________
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http://www.genmay.com/showthread.php?t=572323
Old 02-20-2008, 12:20 AM TheMorlock is offline  
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