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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...-outbreak.html

World Health Organisation calls emergency meeting to respond to SARS-like outbreak
Health experts have started an emergency international meeting to devise ways of combating a mysterious virus that has been described as the single biggest worldwide public health threat after claiming 38 lives, mostly in Saudi Arabia.
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Old 06-20-2013, 06:08 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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c you auntie
 
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wow
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[QUOTE=gribly;25172353] They don't exist to you. They don't exist to you.[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=IcW@teR;25177936] i just got baked and started thinking of how it's all steps to a 184 future.[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=Tex Arcana;25182205]The only evidence I need is the reality of my world.[/QUOTE]
Old 06-20-2013, 06:10 PM c you auntie is offline  
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pyramid
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I was wondering when you were gonna show up and post something about that.
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Old 06-20-2013, 06:11 PM pyramid is offline  
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BlisterDick
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I'm not going to get into some tinfoil hat conspiracy argument, but viruses like these do have the potential to be very serious.

Yes, in their present forms they kill substantially less people then the common flu viruses do every year. The problem is, if they mutated to a form that became easily transmittable from human to human, than mass casualties could be widespread. In their current forms death rates are extremely high - well over 50% and in some cases as high as 80%-90% - but transmission rates are extremely low between humans and in many cases almost non-existent (only transmissible from animal to human, making them much easier identify, locate and quarantine).

However, because of the nature of these viruses - they cause the body's immune system to attack itself, most commonly by identifying the inner linings of the lungs as threats and flooding them with fluids to exterminate these threats (see cytokine storm), and because the stronger the hosts immune system is the quicker they die (ages ~18-40) - if transmission from human to human became a reality mass casualties could become a very real possibility.

However, at this point these types of "super" avian influenza have relatively low transmission rates between humans. So, they're nothing to get your panties knotted up about.
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Old 06-20-2013, 06:28 PM BlisterDick is offline  
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Tex Arcana
I am a mean disrespectful person hiding anonymously and need an attitude adjustment.
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlisterDick View Post
I'm not going to get into some tinfoil hat conspiracy argument, but viruses like these do have the potential to be very serious.

Yes, in their present forms they kill substantially less people then the common flu viruses do every year. The problem is, if they mutated to a form that became easily transmittable from human to human, than mass casualties could be widespread. In their current forms death rates are extremely high - well over 50% and in some cases as high as 80%-90% - but transmission rates are extremely low between humans and in many cases almost non-existent (only transmissible from animal to human, making them much easier identify, locate and quarantine).

However, because of the nature of these viruses - they cause the body's immune system to attack itself, most commonly by identifying the inner linings of the lungs as threats and flooding them with fluids to exterminate these threats (see cytokine storm), and because the stronger the hosts immune system is the quicker they die (ages ~18-40) - if transmission from human to human became a reality mass casualties could become a very real possibility.

However, at this point these types of "super" avian influenza have relatively low transmission rates between humans. So, they're nothing to get your panties knotted up about.

Yeah, except that it's well known that DNA is very mutable, and it doesnt take much.

Bird flu used to NOT affect humans; now it does. Staph used to be beatable with common antibiotics; now, it eats your limbs off, and they sometimes can't stop it.

It keeps changing, mutating, every generation gets more virulent, until bodies adapt, and creatures die along the way. The problem humans have is their incessant insistence that the world is a still photograph, never changing once we figure something out.

Of course we are morons. Of course this shit gets out of hand. Of course we die.

For it to begin again.
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Old 06-20-2013, 08:57 PM Tex Arcana is offline  
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BlisterDick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex Arcana View Post
Yeah, except that it's well known that DNA is very mutable, and it doesnt take much.

Bird flu used to NOT affect humans; now it does. Staph used to be beatable with common antibiotics; now, it eats your limbs off, and they sometimes can't stop it.

It keeps changing, mutating, every generation gets more virulent, until bodies adapt, and creatures die along the way. The problem humans have is their incessant insistence that the world is a still photograph, never changing once we figure something out.

Of course we are morons. Of course this shit gets out of hand. Of course we die.

For it to begin again.

We're still here and there has yet to be a massive outbreak, which means - the virii has yet to mutate to a level that is easily transmissible. If ANY of these 'avian' flu viruses had mutated from what they currently are to a form that is transmissible between humans a worldwide outbreak would've happened already.

Can it happen? Yes.

Will it happen? Probably not.
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Old 06-20-2013, 09:09 PM BlisterDick is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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this from... http://www.philly.com/philly/health/...udy_Finds.html


H7N9 Bird Flu Transmits From Person to Person, Study Finds
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/health/...1qkahqGw1x0.99


WEDNESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to previously published reports, the deadly H7N9 bird flu can spread from person to person and may be a serious threat to humans, Chinese health officials report. The virus, which has killed one-third of the patients hospitalized with it, attaches itself to cells in the windpipe and lungs, infecting even cells lodged deep in the respiratory system, said researchers who analyzed the biological features of the virus. This dual-target binding may make the virus better able to jump from birds to humans, according to their report, which was published July 3 in the journal Nature. "The new virus has a unique binding property," said lead researcher Yuelong Shu, director of the Chinese National Influenza Center at the China CDC in Beijing. There is no need for widespread alarm, however, another expert said. The same aspects of the H7N9 flu that make it so severe -- its location in the lower respiratory system, for example -- also make it harder to transmit from person to person. Since this bird flu strain was identified in February, 132 cases, including 39 deaths, have been confirmed in China, according to the study. Most patients were elderly and at high risk of complications because of their age, and many had contact with poultry, according to previous reports. Unlike H5N1 (another bird virus that appeared in 2003) and H1N1 flu viruses, the H7N9 binds to bird and human cells. "Our study describes several important features of the novel avian H7N9 virus that has emerged in China," Shu said. "We strongly believe that it is a new pathogen posing high risks to humans." Shu's team analyzed characteristics of the virus using cell and tissue samples, including some from three humans with H7N9. "It is essential to characterize the biological features of the new virus so that appropriate public health measures could be planned to prepare if it becomes pandemic," Shu said. Once infected, patients have unusually high levels of inflammatory and immune cells, referred to as a cytokine storm, which may contribute to symptom severity, he said. The severity of H7N9 infection and its emerging resistance to antiviral drugs make treating it a challenge, Shu said. Also, its unpredictable evolution and adaptation and the lack of pre-existing immunity leave the human population at high risk, he said. Dr. Marc Siegel, an associate professor of medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said sustained transmission is what makes a virus a problem for humans. "This is yet another virus with some potential to do humans harm, but not high on the list in terms of probabilities," he said. "It's out there, meaning that scientists and epidemiologists have to keep careful track of it," he said. But at present, "there is no evidence that it spreads rapidly from human to human." Still, Siegel supports developing a vaccine against H7N9 as a precaution. "But I wouldn't ramp up and start making a million doses," he said. H7 flu viruses have never caused a human pandemic, Siegel said. "It's a bug we need to follow and scientists need to be concerned about it, but not the general public," he said. A report in the June 23 issue of the journal The Lancet suggested that H7N9 has a lower death rate than H5N1, which killed about 60 percent of patients admitted to the hospital, but is deadlier than the 2009 H1N1 swine flu virus that killed 21 percent of patients who were hospitalized.
Read more at
http://www.philly.com/philly/health/coldandflu/HealthDay677930_20130703_H7N9_Bird_Flu_Transmits_From_Person_to_Person__Study_Finds.html#sUKQI1qkahqGw1x0.9 9
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 07-04-2013, 10:05 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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Sup
 
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oh shit
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Old 07-04-2013, 10:08 AM Sup is offline  
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Vote McCain!
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scaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaary
Old 07-19-2013, 12:57 PM Vote McCain! is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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this from... http://www.nbcnews.com/health/h7n9-b...ind-6C10862531


H7N9 bird flu in likely China spread between people, researchers find
Kate Kelland Reuters

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LONDON - The first scientific analysis of probable human-to-human transmission of a deadly new strain of bird flu that emerged in China this year gives the strongest evidence yet that the H7N9 virus can pass between people, scientists said on Wednesday.

Research published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) analyzing a family cluster of cases of H7N9 infection in eastern China found it was very likely the virus "transmitted directly from the index patient (a 60-year-old man) to his daughter."

Experts commenting on the research said while it did not necessarily mean H7N9 is any closer to becoming the next flu pandemic, "it does provide a timely reminder of the need to remain extremely vigilant."

"The threat posed by H7N9 has by no means passed," James Rudge and Richard Coker of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine said in a commentary in the same journal.

The scientists who led the study stressed, however, that the virus has not yet gained the ability to transmit from person to person efficiently - meaning the risk is very low that it could cause a human pandemic in its current form.

The new bird flu virus, which was unknown in humans until February, has so far infected at least 133 people in China and Taiwan, killing 43 of them, according to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) data.

Most cases have been in people who had visited live poultry markets or had close contact with live poultry in seven to 10 days before falling ill.

The BMJ study, lead by Chang-jun Bao at the Jiangsu Province Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, analyzed a family cluster of two H7N9 patients - a father and daughter - in Eastern China in March 2013.

The first "index" patient - a 60-year-old man - regularly went to a live poultry market and became ill five to six days after his last exposure to poultry.

He was admitted to hospital on March 11. When his symptoms became worse, he was transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU) on March 15 but died of multi-organ failure on May 4, the study reported.

The second patient, his healthy 32-year-old daughter, had no known exposure to live poultry but provided direct bedside care for her father in the hospital before he went to intensive care.

She developed symptoms six days after her last contact with her father and went into hospital on March 24. She was moved to the ICU on March 28 and died of multi-organ failure on April 24.

Strains of the virus isolated from samples taken from each patient were "almost genetically identical" - a strong suggestion that the virus was transmitted directly from father to daughter, the researchers said.

"To our best knowledge, this is the first report of probable transmissibility of the novel virus person-to-person with detailed epidemiological, clinical and virological data," they wrote.

Peter Horby of the Oxford University clinical research unit in Hanoi, Vietnam, who was not involved in this research, said the study raised the level of concern about H7N9 and reinforced the need for intensive surveillance.

Copyright 2013 Thomson Reuters.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 08-06-2013, 05:25 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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Xcric
i have 3 girlfriends but they dont know it yet
 
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thanks for the update chief.
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Old 08-06-2013, 05:55 PM Xcric is offline  
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Vote McCain!
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I'mma scarrrrrred
Old 08-06-2013, 07:32 PM Vote McCain! is offline  
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curdledvomit
 
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oh and also there is going to be a huge earth quake/ tsunami situation in Cali very soon. you are welcome.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

acc6d08c13aa2f2586ec5bf7b70854c3
Old 09-06-2013, 10:22 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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Vendetta
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hey look at that, we're all still alive!
Old 09-06-2013, 10:24 AM Vendetta is offline  
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edplayer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curdledvomit View Post
oh and also there is going to be a huge earth quake/ tsunami situation in Cali very soon. you are welcome.


I love earthquakes. It's like you are getting an amusement park ride for free
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[QUOTE=g|aSsJaw;25381666]I'm not going to go back and forth with you about it all night, you clearly have no idea what you're talking about.[/QUOTE]
Old 09-06-2013, 11:00 AM edplayer is offline  
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