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imsoocool
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ules
Found bird flu at a farm in my city

send me a sample of your infested puss once you get it. thx
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Old 11-18-2005, 10:29 PM imsoocool is offline  
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this from http://english.people.com.cn/200511/...20_222671.html

H5N1 bird flu found in wild birds in central Canada


Wild birds in Canada's central province of Manitoba have tested positive for a low-pathogenic subtype of the H5N1 avian flu virus, a health official said on Saturday.

The strains are from the family of North American H5N1 viruses, not the forms circulating in Southeast Asia, said Dr. Brian Evans, chief veterinary officer at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency ( CFIA).

"I want to emphasize that the H5N1 subtype detected in Manitoba is completely distinct from the strain currently present in Asia," said Evans

"From a genetic perspective, there are significant strain differences in their structure," he said.

In addition, officials isolated an H5N3 subtype in two birds from Quebec, as part of a cross-country surveillance program to find what avian flu viruses are being carried by wild ducks in this country.

"Finding only low pathogenic avian influenza means that these viruses would cause only mild disease, if any at all, if introduced into domestic birds," Evans said.

Meanwhile, a commercial farm in British Columbia's Fraser Valley remains under quarantine after a duck was found infected with a strain of H5 bird flu on Friday.

North American H5N1 viruses have so far proven to be much milder viruses than their distant Asian counterparts, avian influenza experts say.

"We've got 32 years of surveillance work that says these North American strains in wild birds in the past have never been a threat," Dr. Richard Slemons, an avian influenza expert at Ohio State University, told The Canadian Press.

"Does that mean they won't be a threat in the future? No it does not. But history says they aren't a risk," he said.

The Asian H5N1 viruses, which are highly pathogenic, have infected 130 people in five countries since 2003 and 67 of those people have died.

Source: Xinhua
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Old 11-20-2005, 07:50 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curdledvomit
this from http://english.people.com.cn/200511/...20_222671.html

H5N1 bird flu found in wild birds in central Canada


Wild birds in Canada's central province of Manitoba have tested positive for a low-pathogenic subtype of the H5N1 avian flu virus, a health official said on Saturday.

The strains are from the family of North American H5N1 viruses, not the forms circulating in Southeast Asia, said Dr. Brian Evans, chief veterinary officer at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency ( CFIA).

"I want to emphasize that the H5N1 subtype detected in Manitoba is completely distinct from the strain currently present in Asia," said Evans

"From a genetic perspective, there are significant strain differences in their structure," he said.


In addition, officials isolated an H5N3 subtype in two birds from Quebec, as part of a cross-country surveillance program to find what avian flu viruses are being carried by wild ducks in this country.

"Finding only low pathogenic avian influenza means that these viruses would cause only mild disease, if any at all, if introduced into domestic birds," Evans said.

Meanwhile, a commercial farm in British Columbia's Fraser Valley remains under quarantine after a duck was found infected with a strain of H5 bird flu on Friday.

North American H5N1 viruses have so far proven to be much milder viruses than their distant Asian counterparts, avian influenza experts say.

"We've got 32 years of surveillance work that says these North American strains in wild birds in the past have never been a threat," Dr. Richard Slemons, an avian influenza expert at Ohio State University, told The Canadian Press.

"Does that mean they won't be a threat in the future? No it does not. But history says they aren't a risk," he said.

The Asian H5N1 viruses, which are highly pathogenic, have infected 130 people in five countries since 2003 and 67 of those people have died.

Source: Xinhua
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Old 11-20-2005, 06:17 PM Jester is offline  
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this from http://today.reuters.com/news/newsAr...RDFLU-ROOM.xml






WHO's "war room" prepares for bird flu pandemic

By Stephanie Nebehay


GENEVA (Reuters) - Known as the "war room" or the "bunker," it is the world's nerve-center for tracking deadly diseases from Ebola hemorrhagic fever to bird flu.

Each day, officials at the World Health Organization (WHO) use its sophisticated communications systems to monitor suspected disease outbreaks and contact experts in the field.

The screen-filled room will become a global command center if the H5N1 bird flu virus, which has killed more than 60 people in Asia since 2003, mutates into a form which spreads easily among humans, sparking an influenza pandemic which could kill millions in months.

"This room is the eyes and ears of the global epidemic response. The technology in the room takes us to another level," said Dr. Mike Ryan, WHO's director of epidemic and pandemic alert and response.

The Strategic Health Operations Center (SHOC) is a $5 million state-of-the-art facility in a former cinema at the WHO's Geneva headquarters. Shortly after opening a year ago, it was used to help coordinate medical teams during Asia's tsunami.

Funded by donors led by the United States, it has screens for video-conferencing and displaying Web sites and satellite feeds. Round-the-clock, computers transmit audio, video and data from some 66 offices connected to the hub so far.

"Pandemic flu will run us ragged here," Ryan said.

"The world will look to the WHO for immediate information, for risk assessment, for the world's weather system when it comes to where the flu is and where it is going," he said.

HIGHER PROFILE

Ryan said the war room gave the WHO a single point of coordination to try to contain outbreaks of diseases like cholera, dengue fever, Ebola, SARS, malaria and bird flu. The United Nations agency's public profile has risen since bird flu and SARS, or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, emerged in Asia in the past few years and then jumped continents. Continued ...
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Old 11-21-2005, 09:50 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from http://www.thsv.org/news_details.aspx?newsID=1006

Flu Spreads To 25% Of Vietnam
Fri Nov 18, 7:05 PM (AP News)

Bird flu has spread to a quarter of Vietnam's provinces as officials on Friday reported the latest outbreaks in two new northern provinces.

Thai Binh and Bac Ninh provinces are the newest ones to be hit by the H5N1 strain of bird flu, making 17 of the country's 64 cities and provinces infected in the last month.

Vietnam has been battling the H5N1 virus since it emerged across poultry farms in late 2003. At least 67 people have died in the region from bird flu, with about two thirds of those deaths in Vietnam.

The country has taken increasingly tough measures against bird flu as the winter months approach, when the virus is most likely to spread.

In northern Bac Ninh province, tests results released Friday on samples taken from a flock of chickens at a commercial farm were positive for bird flu, said Nguyen Van Lung, director of the provincial animal health department.

Thai Binh provincial animal health director Dang Duc Rieu said 40 chickens had fallen ill and died early in the week. The entire flock of 100 birds was culled the same day. Tests results Friday showed they had bird flu, he said.

Provincial animal health officials said all poultry in the town was destroyed Friday afternoon. Thirteen of the 17 affected provinces are in the northern region, while two are in central Vietnam and two in the southern Mekong Delta.

Thursday, Vietnam's Prime Minister Phan Van Khai approved another $82.6 million for the fight against bird flu in Vietnam, as the government announced plans for its first large-scale emergency drill later this month.

China on Friday also reported two new outbreaks of bird flu among its vast poultry flocks, even as it released dozens of farmers and villagers from medical observation with clean bills of health, the government said.

The latest poultry outbreaks were hundreds of miles apart in the northern province of Shanxi and the far northwestern region of Xinjiang, the official Xinhua News Agency said. All poultry on nearby farms have been killed as a precaution, it said.

China has now reported 15 outbreaks of bird flu in poultry nationwide since Oct. 19 and has promised tough control measures to prevent human infections.

It confirmed its first human cases of bird flu on Wednesday, a woman who died and a boy who recovered. The boy's sister, who died, is a suspected case.

The dozens of people who had contact with the three patients showed no signs of the disease and have been released from medical care, Xinhua said.

In the eastern province of Anhui, 22 farmers who had close contact with the 24-year-old woman "were all OK," Wu Fuqing, an Anhui official, was quoted as saying by Xinhua.

In Hunan province in central China, "no abnormal signs" were detected in 152 villagers who came in contact with the 9-year-old boy or his 12-year-old sister, who died of the same symptoms, Xinhua said. She is considered a suspected case because her body was cremated and there weren't adequate samples for testing.

Additionally, 908 people who came down with fever are recovering, said Ai Ronggui, deputy director of the health bureau in Xiangtan, the county in Hunan where the outbreak occurred.

At least 67 people in Asia have died since 2003, when the virulent H5N1 strain of bird flu became entrenched in poultry populations.
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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 11-21-2005, 09:57 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_d...684&con_type=1


Now wash your hands, says expert

While governments fret over antiviral drugs and elaborate plans to ward off a looming flu pandemic, an expert said Monday that the best prevention is simple: wash your hands and cover your mouth when you sneeze.


Tuesday, November 22, 2005

While governments fret over antiviral drugs and elaborate plans to ward off a looming flu pandemic, an expert said Monday that the best prevention is simple: wash your hands and cover your mouth when you sneeze.


"It's very glamorous to talk about [antiviral drug] Tamiflu and vaccines but, actually, wash your hands, cover your mouth when you sneeze, then wash your hands," said Chinese University School of Public Health director Sian Griffiths.

"It is really basic, it's a bug that spreads like any other bug," she said. Griffiths was part of an international committee of experts which examined what went wrong in Hong Kong during the SARS epidemic in 2003, which killed early 300 people here and 800 worldwide.

A lethal strain of the bird flu virus, H5N1, has killed 67 of the 130 people it is known to have infected in Asia since 2003 - mainly in Vietnam and Thailand. Most of the victims contracted the virus directly from handling infected chickens, but it has not shown that it can spread easily among people.

Scientists fear, however, that it might mutate into a form that can do so and spark a global pandemic, killing millions.

Around the world, governments are scrambling to get their hands on Tamiflu, a drug believed to be capable of reducing the symptoms and chances of complications caused by the virus.

Griffiths, however, stressed that, while H5N1 is thought of as being the likeliest culprit that will present the world with its next influenza pandemic, that may not be the case.

"We don't know that the flu pandemic will be spread from avian flu, from H5N1; we are postulating it, we don't know it," Griffiths said.

"Therefore, it's basic principles, it's prevention. It has to start in the agriculture community because we know that it's animal-man spread that is the cause of the new viruses.

"That happened with SARS, with historical flu viruses. So how do we stop man-transfer? It's agricultural practice [and] animal rearing; then there is personal hygiene and behavior."

Griffiths, who has had a long career in public health in Britain, said Hong Kong is prepared for the outbreak of an influenza pandemic because of its experience with SARS and its high level of public awareness. It was also in Hong Kong that H5N1 made its first known jump to humans in 1997, when it infected 18 people and killed six. REUTERS
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00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 11-21-2005, 11:18 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from http://za.today.reuters.com/news/new...A-20051121.XML


Romania confirms H5N1 virus in Danube delta poultry
Mon Nov 21, 2005 11:33 AM GMT
By Martin Dokoupil

BUCHAREST (Reuters) - Laboratory tests in Britain confirmed the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu in samples taken from Romanian hens found dead last week in a Danube delta village, the agriculture ministry said on Monday.

The Balkan state last month became the first country in mainland Europe to detect the deadly H5N1 virus in poultry in two villages in the Danube delta, Europe's largest wetlands near the Black Sea.

"Regarding the samples in Caraorman, the laboratory in London confirmed it was the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus," the ministry said on its website.

Romania said on November 14 that four new cases of avian flu in domestic birds had been discovered in Caraorman. The village, which has no road access, was quarantined and around 2,000 domestic birds were slaughtered last week.

The ministry said the bird flu virus had also been isolated in five swans found in the gulf of Muzura, near the border with Ukraine, and in three other wild birds found near the village of Obretinul Mic, about 10 kilometres (6 miles) north of Caraorman.

Samples will be sent to the laboratory in Weybridge, near London, to determine whether it is the H5N1 strain, the ministry said, but did not say when the results would be known.

Spokesman Adrian Tibu said the Agriculture Ministry was conducting random tests to track the spread of bird flu.

"We monitor wild birds, shooting some of them to see how far the virus is spreading. We keep testing domestic fowl," he said.

Tests on poultry sent to check whether the disease was still present in the village of Maliuc -- where the H5N1 strain was detected in October -- were negative, the ministry said, and all restrictions imposed on villagers had been lifted.

The H5N1 strain has killed more than 60 people in Asia since 2003 and led to the slaughter of millions of domestic birds. Scientists fear the virus might mutate into a form that could be easily transmitted between humans.

Romania has not so far reported any cases of bird flu in humans.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 11-21-2005, 05:00 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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this from http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...0&refer=canada


Canada Says Second Duck Farm Shows Avian Flu (Update1) Nov. 22 (Bloomberg) -- A second duck farm in British Columbia has tested positive for avian influenza, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said today.

The second farm was within the five-kilometer (three-mile) surveillance zone and may have been infected by equipment moving from one farm to the other, Con Kiley, a veterinarian with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, said during a conference call from Abbotsford, British Columbia.

``There are no signs of the disease, so we assume a low pathogenic,'' type of H5 North American strain, Kiley said. The second farm has 2,800 ducks, mostly breeding stock, and is owned by the same group as the first farm.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture yesterday banned imports of poultry from British Columbia after a duck tested positive for avian influenza at the first farm near Chilliwack.

The H5 strain found in British Columbia is a milder North American form of bird flu, different from the deadly Asian variety.

``There is no new risk to food safety or human health,'' said Kiley. ``The two farms represent a contained pocket of infection.''

Ducks at the second farm will be slaughtered, as were the 55,000 birds at the first farm.

Jim Rogers, a spokesman for the U.S. Agriculture Department said the U.S. ban is limited to live birds, uncooked raw poultry and unprocessed products. Cooked chicken products are still allowed, Rogers said. The ban also doesn't extend to Vancouver Island.

The ban may be modified depending on the Canadian epidemiological investigation, he said.

In Asia, the deadly H5NI strain of the virus has infected at least 130 people and killed 67 since December 2003 in Vietnam, China, Cambodia, Indonesia and Thailand, the World Health Organization has said.


To contact the reporter on this story:Reg Curren in Calgary at rcurren@bloomberg.net.Last Updated: November 22, 2005 18:20 EST
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 11-22-2005, 09:45 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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Hasn't mutated yet?

FUCKING AWESOME!

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Old 11-22-2005, 09:51 PM Vienge. is offline  
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Any reports in the U.S. yet?
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Old 11-22-2005, 09:55 PM FishHead is offline  
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this from http://www.news24.com/News24/World/B...841903,00.html


Human bird flu 'mutating'
28/11/2005 14:56 - (SA)


Beijing - The H5N1 strain of bird flu seen in human cases in China has mutated as compared with strains found in human cases in Vietnam, state press said on Monday, citing a health ministry spokesperson.

Chinese labs have found that the genetic order of the H5N1 virus seen in humans infected in China is different from that found in humans in Vietnam, Xinhua news agency reported.

In China's human cases, the virus has mutated "to a certain degree", health ministry spokesperson Mao Qun'an was quoted as saying.

"But the mutation cannot cause human-to-human transmission of the avian flu," he noted.

China this month confirmed its first three human cases of bird flu, two of which were fatal. The disease has killed more than 60 people in Asia since 2003. Health officials fear that the virus could mutate to the extent where it is easily transmitted from human-to-human, an event that could lead to a global pandemic capable of killing hundreds of millions of people.
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

00110001 00110011 01101011 and damn proud of it!

Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 11-28-2005, 10:27 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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Janet Reno
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dude drop it already

edit : from your very article

"But the mutation cannot cause human-to-human transmission of the avian flu," he noted.

YEAH REALLY BREAKING SCARY NEWS DUDE GLAD YOU TOLD ME
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Old 11-28-2005, 10:31 AM Janet Reno is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet Reno
dude drop it already

edit : from your very article

"But the mutation cannot cause human-to-human transmission of the avian flu," he noted.

YEAH REALLY BREAKING SCARY NEWS DUDE GLAD YOU TOLD ME

read the first post in the thread

u = stalker
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how about a nice hot steaming bowl of STFU!

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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 11-28-2005, 10:37 AM curdledvomit is offline  
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Can it be spread human to human yet?

No?

FUCKING AWESOME!

/care
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Old 11-28-2005, 10:48 AM Vienge. is offline  
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this from http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/con...2805avflu.html


Two human H5N1 cases noted; poultry outbreaks expand

Nov 28, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Two more human cases of H5N1 avian influenza have been confirmed in recent days in Vietnam and Indonesia, while poultry outbreaks are spreading in China and Romania.

The World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed Nov 25 that a 15-year-old boy from Vietnam's Haiphong province has H5N1 infection, which Vietnamese authorities announced last week. The boy has been discharged from a hospital and is recovering, the WHO said. He is the 66th Vietnamese to contract avian flu.

A 16-year-old boy was confirmed today as having Indonesia's 12th avian flu case, according to a Nov 26 report by Agence France-Presse (AFP). He was hospitalized in good condition in the West Java capital of Bandung, said Hariadi Wibisono of the Indonesian health industry, as quoted by AFP.

"Tests [on blood] taken from the 16-year-old boy, both locally and by the World Health Organization, show that he is a bird flu patient," Wibisono said. The WHO hasn't updated its case count to reflect confirmation of the case.

The WHO said it would send a team to the eastern Chinese province of Anhui to investigate human deaths from H5N1, according to the English version of the China People's Daily Online. Two deaths have been confirmed in that province.

China wrestles with poultry outbreaks
China has reported seven new outbreaks in poultry in less than 10 days, according to the English version of the Chinese People's Daily Online on Nov 25. Outbreaks have led to the culling of about 17,000 birds in an Inner Mongolian village, according to a Nov 25 report China filed with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Bloomberg News reported on Nov 26 that China has had 27 poultry outbreaks this year.

Romanian poultry case outside Danube delta
Romanian officials found the H5N1 virus in a remote village 70 miles from the Danube River delta, leading to a cull of roughly 17,000 poultry in the village of Scarlatesti, Reuters news service reported on Nov 26. Samples from a turkey in Scarlatesti were positive in initial testing in Romania; follow-up testing will occur in a laboratory near London, the story said.

The cull in Scarlatesti led to the firing of two of the country's chief veterinarians, Reuters reported today, after a television station aired film showing inhumane culling.

A private TV station showed footage of a man wringing the neck of a goose and then throwing the bird into a fire. The Reuters report indicates some birds were not dead before being thrown into the flames.

Animal rights groups were angered and said that Romania wasn't complying with standards it must meet to succeed in its bid to join the European Union, Reuters reported. Poisoning with gas is a generally approved method for culling large flocks, Reuters said, citing experts who insist that any culling method must be safe, humane, and efficient.

See also:

WHO confirmation of 66th Vietnamese case
http://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_11_25/en/index.html

China's Nov 25 and Nov 23 reports to OIE
http://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/China%20Follow-up%20report%20No10.pdf
http://www.oie.int/eng/info/hebdo/aIS_43.htm#Sec1

Romania's Nov 27 reports to OIE
http://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/Romania%20Follow%20up%20No10.pdf
http://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/Romania%20Follow%20up%20No9.pdf
__________________
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Squid posted..."curdledvomit is the first +10k guy i actually care about"

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Old 11-28-2005, 08:07 PM curdledvomit is offline  
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