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mohavewolfpup
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gribly View Post
Linux is pretty easy... Maybe if you posted details someone could help, but it probably makes you feel better to just complain.

oh really? I'm still trying to figure how how I managed to fully compile from scratch a IRCD/services setup that alot said was difficult to do (even had it running) but still couldn't solve it's "lets make a 120 gig drive a 4 gig" problem. piece of shit os and plain and simple.

Windows works because most of the time you don't have to dick around with it. I've been around since the IRQ hell that was windows 3.1, vesa mode video drivers, soundblaster 16, so I i'm no idiot when it comes to systems
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Old 05-12-2010, 03:35 AM mohavewolfpup is offline  
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Lurker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :ninja: View Post
Funny, I dislike Windows for the same reason.

Switching soundcards on Windows:
1) Uninstall old driver
2) Download driver cleaner, because you know it's not completely gone
3) Boot into safe mode and run the driver cleaner
4) Hope it actually works
5) Turn off computer, switch sound card
6) Hit up Google for new drivers
7) Hope it's in English
8) Close 30 windows that pop up after trying to download driver
9) Finally download the driver
10) Extract the driver
11) Install the driver
12) Reboot
13) Hope your new card is working


Doing the same thing in Linux:
1) Turn off computer
2) Switch sound cards
3) Boot up
4) OS tells you that your new card is ready to use and asks if you would like it to forget about your old sound card

I think you have windows and linux confused.
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Old 05-12-2010, 09:25 AM Lurker is offline  
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#17  

eramus
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Originally Posted by mohavewolfpup View Post
oh really? I'm still trying to figure how how I managed to fully compile from scratch a IRCD/services setup that alot said was difficult to do (even had it running) but still couldn't solve it's "lets make a 120 gig drive a 4 gig" problem. piece of shit os and plain and simple.

Windows works because most of the time you don't have to dick around with it. I've been around since the IRQ hell that was windows 3.1, vesa mode video drivers, soundblaster 16, so I i'm no idiot when it comes to systems
its hardly a piece of shit os; millions of servers on the net (and elsewhere) wouldnt have some sort of linux installation if that were the case. maybe you dont know as much about computers as you lead on - maybe windows but not linux. as for your disk issue, its possible you used an incorrect file system type. there are some that do have 4 gig limits.
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Old 05-12-2010, 10:36 AM eramus is offline  
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#18  

Forever Domon
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :ninja: View Post
Funny, I dislike Windows for the same reason.

Switching soundcards on Windows:
1) Uninstall old driver
2) Download driver cleaner, because you know it's not completely gone
3) Boot into safe mode and run the driver cleaner
4) Hope it actually works
5) Turn off computer, switch sound card
6) Hit up Google for new drivers
7) Hope it's in English
8) Close 30 windows that pop up after trying to download driver
9) Finally download the driver
10) Extract the driver
11) Install the driver
12) Reboot
13) Hope your new card is working


Doing the same thing in Linux:
1) Turn off computer
2) Switch sound cards
3) Boot up
4) OS tells you that your new card is ready to use and asks if you would like it to forget about your old sound card

This was with a rather recent card (Asus Xonar Essence STX). A friend and I each got one, and he shared with me the nightmare which was switching cards. Apparently the Creative drivers made life difficult.

I didn't even think about running into problems. I expected to turn off the computer, switch the cards, turn on the computer, and have it work immediately. That's exactly what happened.
or:

Windows: do everything you said, but end up with a working card in the end

Linux: Realize the OS doesnt even support your card at all, no matter what, have no sound

(Auzentech Prelude)
Old 05-12-2010, 10:39 AM Forever Domon is offline  
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#19  

Xayd
 
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Originally Posted by eramus View Post
its hardly a piece of shit os; millions of servers on the net (and elsewhere) wouldnt have some sort of linux installation if that were the case. maybe you dont know as much about computers as you lead on - maybe windows but not linux. as for your disk issue, its possible you used an incorrect file system type. there are some that do have 4 gig limits.

servers don't require GUIs or hardware support outside of a handful of NIC chipsets.
Old 05-12-2010, 06:07 PM Xayd is offline  
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#20  

eramus
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servers don't require GUIs or hardware support outside of a handful of NIC chipsets.
i dont really see where youre going with that statement; linux distros provide support for a mile long list of hardware - both new and old. even outside of the server environment, linux is a perfectly reasonable and stable platform if a small amount of time is spent researching and configuring it - most of which is configured automatically during installation. X and the window managers have come a long way for giving desktop users a good experience.
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Old 05-13-2010, 05:10 PM eramus is offline  
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#21  

gribly
 
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To be honest - I use linux exclusively and the last Windows I used was XP. I don't even know the features or what's up with the new versions. I'm happy with what I got.
Old 05-13-2010, 06:10 PM gribly is offline  
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#22  

Xayd
 
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Originally Posted by eramus View Post
i dont really see where youre going with that statement; linux distros provide support for a mile long list of hardware - both new and old. even outside of the server environment, linux is a perfectly reasonable and stable platform if a small amount of time is spent researching and configuring it - most of which is configured automatically during installation. X and the window managers have come a long way for giving desktop users a good experience.

no, linux distros fix the broken code that the individual code projects distribute independently of each other. without the distros, it would still be nothing but a kernel and random bits of code that no one uses.

X has not come very far at all, actually. try to download the 'stable' releases of all of the code required for a working linux desktop and compile them all yourself (and no gentoo does NOT count). you'll find it quite impossible. because most of them have broken dependencies, broken configurations, broken interfaces with each other, etc etc etc. they are broken because they've always been broken. all the distros have done is give the authors of that code a reason to not worry about fixing bugs all that much. but rather, for example, add functionality that VLC has done better for years to another half-working software package.

which doesn't matter, unless a distro, say...declares the end of life of the OS that people used and doesn't offer them an upgrade path other than 'here, these guys will throw something together for you'. then maybe another project springs up that mimics what you were using before, years later.

which begs the question, if linux is primarily used as a server, and it's not a superior server to say, FreeBSD, what is it good for exactly, except an endless string of failed attempts to mimic other, better, desktop operating systems?

none of this should be terribly surprising, since the founder of all of this is so far removed from the real world. the average phone text addicted 12 year old knows more about user interfaces than the GNU founder does.

and yes, i've used *nix servers for years. about 12 to be exact. and i learned a long time ago not to trust linux distros for long term viability. and since, as stated above, the distros are the only thing that glues all of the broken code together, the logical conclusion you eventually arrive at, if you have a need for a *nix server, is to abandon linux entirely since FreeBSD's linux emulation is more reliable.

Last edited by Xayd; 05-13-2010 at 11:51 PM..
Old 05-13-2010, 11:26 PM Xayd is offline  
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#23  

wingedbuttmonkey
 
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Type something in? I WANT PRETTY ICONS SO I DONT HAVE TO

No I just want icons. Them being pretty is just a plus.
Old 05-15-2010, 01:47 PM wingedbuttmonkey is offline  
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#24  

gee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xayd View Post
which begs the question, if linux is primarily used as a server, and it's not a superior server to say, FreeBSD, what is it good for exactly, except an endless string of failed attempts to mimic other, better, desktop operating systems?
Linux is a godsend in the embedded design market. Royalty free OS, it's a *nix so it runs a huge software library, and the fact that it's the "hot OS" at the time means that there's a huge amount of work being done on it - almost any ARM chip sold nowadays will come with an evaluation board and a linux port, which greatly minimizes the amount of effort required to get your system up and running.

Sadly, FreeBSD's ARM port is lacking. It's getting worked on and I'm sure it'll come around, but for now, it's Linux's space.
Old 05-16-2010, 06:48 PM gee is offline  
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#25  

:ninja:
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Linux is a godsend in the embedded design market. Royalty free OS, it's a *nix so it runs a huge software library, and the fact that it's the "hot OS" at the time means that there's a huge amount of work being done on it - almost any ARM chip sold nowadays will come with an evaluation board and a linux port, which greatly minimizes the amount of effort required to get your system up and running.

Sadly, FreeBSD's ARM port is lacking. It's getting worked on and I'm sure it'll come around, but for now, it's Linux's space.

Same with MIPS. I'm a firmware developer for a wireless router company, and every single eval board we've seen came with a fully functional Linux based SDK. We've gotten products to market very quickly for this reason.
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Old 05-16-2010, 11:56 PM :ninja: is offline  
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#26  

CRasch
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Your home router and millions of other routers on the Internet runs *nix. If it wasn't for *nix, you wouldn't have the TCP/IP stack in Windows. (BSD anyone?)
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Old 05-17-2010, 03:07 PM CRasch is offline  
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#27  

Xayd
 
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Linux is a godsend in the embedded design market. Royalty free OS, it's a *nix so it runs a huge software library, and the fact that it's the "hot OS" at the time means that there's a huge amount of work being done on it - almost any ARM chip sold nowadays will come with an evaluation board and a linux port, which greatly minimizes the amount of effort required to get your system up and running.

Sadly, FreeBSD's ARM port is lacking. It's getting worked on and I'm sure it'll come around, but for now, it's Linux's space.

yeah, but that's just because corporations can use it for free. for end user use as a desktop OS that doesn't give it any merit.
Old 05-19-2010, 11:06 PM Xayd is offline  
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#28  

:ninja:
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Quote:
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yeah, but that's just because corporations can use it for free. for end user use as a desktop OS that doesn't give it any merit.

No, it's because it has an active and large development community. Corporations can use BSD for free as well, and they would have no obligation to release any source code. Some do use BSD. Most use Linux.
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Old 05-20-2010, 12:22 AM :ninja: is offline  
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#29  

Xayd
 
yes, it's because there's a large development community giving corporate interests something for free. if you think their use of it has anything to do with anything, besides the fact that it's free, you're delusional. none of which has anything to do with what the distros release being a viable desktop OS.
Old 05-20-2010, 07:34 AM Xayd is offline  
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